Toronto, ON – Kevin Han, Jun Ran Xu, Haleema Khan and Sabrina Cruz have been named University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,500 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $80,000 each. Since inception, 220 students have received this celebrated scholarship. Kevin Han, 18, is a recipient of the $80,000 Schulich Leader Scholarship. A graduate of Dr. Frank J. Hayden Secondary School in Burlington, Ontario, Han will be entering the Faculty of the Applied Science and Engineering program this fall. Jun Ran Xu, 18, is a recipient of the $80,000 Schulich Leader Scholarship. A graduate of Aurora High School in Aurora, Ontario, Xu will be entering the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering program this fall. Haleema Khan, 18, is a recipient of the $60,000 Schulich Leader Scholarship. A graduate of Westlane Secondary School in Niagara Falls, Ontario, Khan will be entering the Life Sciences program at the Faculty of Arts and Science Victoria College this fall. She will be a Victoria College student. Sabrina Cruz, 18, is a recipient of the $60,000 Schulich Leader Scholarship. A graduate of Notre Dame Catholic Secondary School in Ajax, Ontario, Cruz will be entering the Math & Physical Science program at the Faculty of Arts and Sciences this fall. She will be an Innis College student. “It is very important that we support exceptional students that demonstrate great leadership and embrace STEM fields,” said Schulich. “It is an investment not only in their future, but the future of our country. Their pursuits are sure to lead to key innovations in the years ahead.” About Schulich Leader Scholarships Schulich Leader Scholarships are prestigious entrance scholarships awarded to high school graduates enrolling in a Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics (STEM) undergraduate program at participating universities in Canada and Israel. Recognizing the increasing importance and impact that STEM disciplines will have on the prosperity of future generations, businessman and philanthropist Seymour Schulich established this $100 million scholarship fund in 2011 to encourage our best and brightest students to be the next pioneers of global scientific research and innovation. This program awards 100 scholarships annually, valued at more than $5.5 million. Schulich Leaders can devote their full time and attention to their studies, as all of their financial needs are covered over the course of their degree. As a result, many of our highest potential students are winning these scholarships and will make great contributions to society. -30- For more information: www.schulichleaders.com For media inquiries contact: Farida Adam Student Awards Officer University Advancement Tel: 416-978-5701 farida.adam@utoronto.ca www.adm.utoronto.ca Or David Goodman dgoodman@schulichfoundation.org 647-289-1950 Dara Newton dnewton@uja.schulichleaders.com 416-480-6492

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – Every year, humans advance climate change and global warming – and quite likely our own eventual extinction – by injecting about 30 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO₂) into the atmosphere. A team of scientists from the University of Toronto (U of T) believes they’ve found a way to convert all these emissions into energy-rich fuel in a carbon-neutral cycle that uses a very abundant natural resource: silicon. Silicon, readily available in sand, is the seventh most-abundant element in the universe and the second most-abundant element in the earth’s crust. The idea of converting CO₂ emissions to energy isn’t new: there’s been a global race to discover a material that can efficiently convert sunlight, carbon dioxide and water or hydrogen to fuel for decades.  However, the chemical stability of CO₂ has made it difficult to find a practical solution. “A chemistry solution to climate change requires a material that is a highly active and selective catalyst to enable the conversion of CO₂ to fuel. It also needs to be made of elements that are low cost, non-toxic and readily available,” said Geoffrey Ozin, a chemistry professor in U of T’s Faculty of Arts & Science, the Canada Research Chair in Materials Chemistry and lead of U of T’s Solar Fuels Research Cluster. In an article in Nature Communications published August 23, Ozin and colleagues report silicon nanocrystals that meet all the criteria. The hydride-terminated silicon nanocrystals – nanostructured hydrides for short – have an average diameter of 3.5 nanometres and feature a surface area and optical absorption strength sufficient to efficiently harvest the near-infrared, visible and ultraviolet wavelengths of light from the sun together with a powerful chemical-reducing agent on the surface that efficiently and selectively converts gaseous carbon dioxide to gaseous carbon monoxide. The potential result: energy without harmful emissions. “Making use of the reducing power of nanostructured hydrides is a conceptually distinct and commercially interesting strategy for making fuels directly from sunlight,” said Ozin. The U of T Solar Fuels Research Cluster is working to find ways and means to increase the activity, enhance the scale, and boost the rate of production. Their goal is a laboratory demonstration unit and, if successful, a pilot solar refinery. In addition to Ozin, collaborators on the paper include:
  • Le He, Chenxi Qian, Laura Reyes, Wei Sun and P.Y. Wong – Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts & Science;
  • Abdinoor Jelle and Jia Jia – Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts & Science, and Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering;
  • Kulbir Kaur Ghuman, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering;
  • Chandra Veer Singh – Department of Materials Science & Engineering and Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering;
  • Charles A. Mims, Paul G. O’Brien and Thomas E. Wood – Department of Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, and Solar Fuels Research Cluster;
  • Amr S. Helmy – Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering.
- 30 - MEDIA CONTACTS: Geoffrey Ozin Solar Fuels Research Cluster Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts & Science University of Toronto gozin@chem.utoronto.ca (011) 49 721 354 4601 SKYPE, Facetime – please email gozin@chem.utoronto.ca to arrange. *For scheduling purposes, please note Professor Geoffrey Ozin’s whereabouts in the days ahead:
  • Germany from Aug. 25-31 on Central European Summer Time (6 hours ahead of North American Eastern Daylight Time).
Wei Sun Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts & Science University of Toronto wsun@chem.utoronto.ca Sean Bettam Department of Communications, Faculty of Arts & Science University of Toronto s.bettam@utoronto.ca (1) 416 946 7950  

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON –  In what University of Toronto President Meric Gertler called “an historic investment in Canadian science and innovation,” the federal and provincial governments are joining with the university to provide almost $190 million to upgrade almost half of U of T’s research labs over the next two years. The announcement of the Lab Innovation for Toronto (LIFT) project was made Thursday at U of T’s Medical Sciences Building by President Gertler, federal Innovation, Science and Economic Development Minister Navdeep Bains and Science Minister Kirsty Duncan, and provincial Higher Education Minister Deb Matthews. The university will provide $91.8 million, while the federal and provincial governments will contribute $83.7 million and $14.3 million respectively for a total of $189.8 million. “These investments will us attract and retain talent from around the world and across the country. It’s really critical,” Gertler told reporters in a scrum following the announcement. “We’re very well known as a research powerhouse but as the ministers have said if the [lab research] space is substandard it limits what this talent and faculty and student body can do. By modernizing that space the sky is really the limit.” The LIFT project will lead to the renewal of 47 percent of U of T’s research space, said Scott Mabury, vice-president operations. The labs to be renovated by the project are on average 50-years-old and comprise more than 50,000 square metres of inefficient space, he said. Work has already begun and will be complete by the spring of 2018. Using a square metre as a prop at the event, he gave the appreciative crowd an impromptu lesson in what the scale of the infrastructure project really means. If you add the current inefficient lab space up, he said, it’s equivalent in total size to 15 soccer pitches. And, if U of T was building all-new labs instead of rejuvenating existing facilities, the total cost per square metre would be approximately $12,000, totaling close to $650 million. “The renovations will modernize U of T’s research labs to increase usable space and enhance the quality of the research and learning environment,” Mabury said. “They will also improve air handling, climate and electrical systems.” The federal contribution is part of the government’s Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund, Bains said. “This once-in-a-generation investment by the Government of Canada is a historic down payment on the government’s vision to position Canada as a global centre for innovation,” he said, adding that the funding would “create the conditions for innovation and long-term growth that will keep the Canadian economy globally competitive.” Duncan, who has had first-hand experience of U of T lab facilities as both a student and instructor, agreed. “It’s a little extra special to be here today. I’m a proud UC graduate and a former faculty member . . . being back at the university is bringing back wonderful memories,” she told the crowd. “Science has a central role in [Canada’s] Innovation Agenda . . . Through investments such as these, we are strengthening the foundation for building Canada as a global leader in scientific excellence.” “Through investments such as these, we are strengthening the foundation for building Canada as a global leader in scientific excellence.” Deb Matthews, Ontario's minister of advanced education and skills development, said: “Our government is proud to support this important project, which will give University of Toronto students access to the renewed facilities they need to prepare for successful careers in science and research. We know that providing access to high-quality education and training facilities is critical to building the skilled workforce we need to support good jobs and economic growth for today and tomorrow and this investment will help us to do it.” “The LIFT project will equip our brilliant scholars, students and staff with the cutting-edge facilities they need to learn, collaborate and discover,” President Gertler said as he thanked the federal and provincial ministers. “The modernization of these labs will also reduce our greenhouse gas emissions significantly. The University of Toronto greatly appreciates the federal and provincial governments’ support of postsecondary education and research, and their leadership in ensuring Canada secures its place among global leaders of science and technology.” Daniel Haas, dean of U of T’s Faculty of Dentistry, also thanked the ministers for the infrastructure funding, which will allow the faculty to sustain its excellence and to make much-needed repairs. “Our research facilities are badly outdated,” Haas said. “Our primary building opened 57 years ago in 1959, and a number of our researchers are working out of a facility built in 1927. We have exceptionally talented people who are being limited in what they can accomplish, simply because of infrastructure. The funding announced today will allow our faculty to capitalize on their potential. It will help us modernize our existing facilities and sustain our position as leaders in health research.” The LIFT project will affect all three campuses and nine academic divisions. The facilities to be renovated include not only medical, dental, biology, chemistry and engineering labs, but also include a former horse barn north of Toronto now used for ecological research, a green roof on the historic 1 Spadina Avenue building (the new home of the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design), an electro-acoustic music studio at the Faculty of Music and many others. For example, at the University of Toronto Scarborough, the campus vivarium and the S-Wing research labs will undergo $17.8 million in renovations, while the University of Toronto Mississauga’s Davis Building will get a $17.1 million upgrade. In total, 546 labs will be fully renovated, providing state-of-the-art research facilities to an estimated 1,100 researchers and 5,500 students. Mario Ostrowski is one of those researchers. A renowned HIV scientist affiliated with St. Michael’s Hospital and U of T’s Faculty of Medicine, Ostrowski says there is fierce competition among research institutions for the best graduate students and post-docs. State-of-the-art labs will help U of T recruit the best and the brightest students, he said, and will also inspire existing researchers and students to greater achievements. “Just like great architecture inspires people every day to achieve excellence, if you’ve got a nice lab that’s state of the art, rather than something old and decrepit that’s falling apart, it inspires and stimulates people to produce excellence.” - 30 – For more information, contact: University of Toronto Media Relations Tel: (416) 978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca  

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – High ocean temperatures and poor timing of parasite management likely led to an epidemic of sea lice in 2015 throughout salmon farms in British Columbia's Queen Charlotte Strait, a University of Toronto-led study has found. The sea lice spread to migrating juvenile wild salmon, resulting in the highest numbers of sea lice observed on wild salmon in a decade. In spring of 2015, a team of U of T ecologists led by postdoctoral researchers Andrew Bateman and Stephanie Peacock found that more than 70 per cent of fish the team sampled in the Strait's Broughton Archipelago had at least one sea louse: the highest prevalence of such parasites since 2005. “It was sort of a perfect storm of environmental conditions and mismanagement of treatment,” says Peacock, a postdoctoral fellow in the U of T’s Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology when the research was conducted. “A lot of people talk about how sea lice are natural, but in farms, you have these parasites in larger numbers. Juvenile wild salmon are then exposed as they migrate past these areas.” Because farmed salmon are in open net pens and share water with nearby wild salmon, the parasites can transmit to young wild salmon who wouldn't normally encounter sea lice until later in life. These young fish are sometimes as small as three centimetres in length, while sea lice themselves can be close to one centimetre in diameter. “Getting sea lice at such an early age affects young salmons' health and their ability to fend off predators,” says Peacock. Based on the numbers of lice on juvenile salmon in 2015, researchers predicted an additional 9 - 39 per cent decline in returning pink salmon due to the outbreak. In order to determine the cause of this outbreak, the team assessed the evidence for four contributing factors:
  • influx of lice on returning adult pink salmon
  • sea surface temperature
  • the timing of chemical treatments to control sea lice on salmon farms
  • resistance of sea lice to chemical treatment on farms
“Even though parasite treatments on farms were effective, we saw that treatments failed to protect wild salmon, and this happened at a time of unexpected warming in ocean water in these regions,” says Martin Krkosek, assistant professor in U of T’s Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology. Krkosek was Bateman’s and Peacock's supervisor and study co-author. The fall of 2014 did have a healthy return of adult pink salmon, bringing sea lice into near-shore waters where they could infect farmed salmon. High ocean temperatures during winter months then likely accelerated sea-louse development, enabling populations to grow quickly and reach higher numbers than they would under normal ocean temperatures. Also in 2015, individual salmon farms did not coordinate anti-louse treatments, with some farms delaying treatment until just prior to the time when juvenile salmon migrate past farms. As a result, sea lice from those farms could have spread to adjacent farms, hampering area-wide control of the outbreak. “Furthermore, during the juvenile wild salmon migration, farms are supposed to treat for sea lice within 15 days of when a threshold number of lice are found on adult farmed salmon,” says Peacock. “But in 2015, some farms waited several months before they treated.” “The strategy might have been 'wait until the migration to treat' but it kind of backfired because the louse populations were allowed to grow in the meantime, and the lice spread to other nearby farms. It likely created a bigger problem down the road.” “We were surprised to see that some farms don’t seem to be following their license conditions,” says Peacock. “We thought maybe there were more infractions in 2015 that may have led to higher numbers of sea lice, but when we looked back over 10 -15 years, the rate of such infractions was about the same. The big difference in 2015 really seems to be the combination of a lack of proactive parasite treatment and higher water temperatures.” The team suggested the solution to such an outbreak in the future would likely be an earlier, coordinated parasite treatment effort between salmon farms – something the researchers say is lacking in this area and across the country. “Sea lice used to be a problem a decade or so ago, then parasite management changed and it seemed like the problem had been effectively managed for several years. Then it wasn't managed well all of a sudden,” says Krkosek. “This is a lesson about the importance of better coordinating and timing regional treatment and being aware of warming ocean temperatures." The results of the team's study appear in a paper published in the July edition of the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. This work was supported by Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and Killam postdoctoral fellowships to Bateman, an NSERC Discovery Grant to Mark Lewis at the University of Alberta that supported Peacock, an NSERC Discovery Grant and Sloan Fellowship to Krkosek, a Global Greengrant from the Marisla Foundation, and an infrastructure grant from the Pacific Salmon Foundation. - 30 - MEDIA CONTACTS: Andrew Bateman Postdoctoral Researcher Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology University of Toronto bat3man@gmail.com 1-778-350-9285 Stephanie Peacock Postdoctoral Researcher Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology University of Toronto stephanie.j.peacock@gmail.com 1-778-266-0575 Martin Krkosek Assistant Professor Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology University of Toronto martin.krkosek@utoronto.ca 1-647-923-7780 Larysa Woloszansky Media Relations Officer University of Toronto larysa.woloszansky@utoronto.ca 1-416-978-6974  

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

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U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – Two astronomers — with the help of Twitter — have uncovered the strongest evidence yet that an enormous X-shaped structure made of stars lies within the central bulge of the Milky Way Galaxy. Previous computer models, observations of other galaxies, and observations of our own galaxy have suggested that the X-shaped structure existed. But no one had observed it directly; and some astronomers argued that previous research that pointed indirectly to the existence of the X could be explained in other ways. “There was controversy about whether the X-shaped structure existed,” says Dustin Lang, a Research Associate at the Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics, University of Toronto, and co-author of the paper describing the discovery. “But our paper gives a good view of the core of our own galaxy. I think it has provided pretty good evidence for the existence of the X-shaped structure.” The results appear in the July issue of theAstronomical Journal. The lead author is Melissa Ness, a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg. The Milky Way Galaxy is a barred spiral galaxy: a disk-shaped collection of dust, gas and billions of stars, 100,000 light-years in diameter. It is far from a simple disk structure, being comprised of two spiral arms, a bar-shaped feature that runs through its centre, and a central bulge of stars. The central bulge, like other barred galaxy’s bulges, resembles a rectangular box or peanut when viewed—as we view it—from within the plane of the galaxy. The X-shaped structure is an integral component of the bulge. Astronomers think the bulge could have formed in two different ways: it may have formed when the Milky Way Galaxy merged with other galaxies; or it may have formed without the help of external influences as an outgrowth of the bar, which itself forms from the evolving galactic disk. Lang and Ness’s finding supports the latter model which predicts the box- or peanut-shaped bulge and the galactic X. This latest, clearest view of the bulge emerged when Lang re-analyzed previously released data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a space telescope launched by NASA in 2009. Before ending its initial mission in 2011, WISE surveyed the entire sky in infrared—imaging three-quarters of a billion galaxies, stars and asteroids. “The bulge is a key signature of formation of the Milky Way Galaxy,” says Ness. “If we understand the bulge we will understand the key processes that have formed and shaped our galaxy.” “The shape of the bulge tells us about how it has formed. We see the X-shape and boxy morphology so clearly in the WISE image and this demonstrates that internal formation processes have been the ones driving the bulge formation.” It is also evidence that our galaxy did not experience major merging events since the bulge formed. If it had, interactions with other galaxies would have disrupted its shape. Lang’s analysis was originally intended to aid in his research in mapping the web of galaxies beyond the Milky Way Galaxy. To help explore the maps he’d developed from the WISE data, he created an interactive map-browsing website and tweeted an image of the entire sky. “Ness saw the tweet and immediately recognized the importance of the X-shaped structure,” says Lang. “We arranged to meet at an upcoming conference we were both attending. The paper was born from that meeting. That’s the power of large surveys and open science!” Supplementary notes: 1) NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, manages and operates WISE for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The spacecraft was put into hibernation mode in 2011, after it scanned the entire sky twice, thereby completing its main objectives. In September 2013, WISE was reactivated, renamed NEOWISE and assigned a new mission to assist NASA’s efforts to identify potentially hazardous near-Earth objects. For more information on WISE: http://nasa.gov/wise 2) With contributions from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. -30- The X-shaped Bulge of the Milky Way Revealed by WISE: http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/0004-6256/152/1/14 Contact details: Dr. Dustin Lang Research Associate Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics University of Toronto e: lang@dunlap.utoronto.ca Skype: dstndstn Google Chat: dstndstn@gmail.com Twitter: @dstndstn Chris Sasaki Communications Coordinator, Public Information Officer Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics University of Toronto p: 416-978-6613 e: csasaki@dunlap.utoronto.ca w: dunlap.utoronto.ca Dr. Melissa Ness Max Planck Institute for Astronomy Heidelberg, Germany e: ness@mpia-hd.mpg.de Twitter: @melissakness Dr. Markus Poessel Public Relations Max Planck Institute for Astronomy Heidelberg, Germany p: (+49 | 0) 6221 528-261 e: poessel@hda-hd.de Elizabeth Landau Media Relations Specialist NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena, Calif. p: (818) 354-6425 e: elizabeth.landau@jpl.nasa.gov The Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics at the University of Toronto is an endowed research institute with over 40 faculty, postdocs, students and staff, dedicated to innovative technology, groundbreaking research, world-class training, and public engagement. The research themes of its faculty and Dunlap Fellows span the Universe and include: optical, infrared and radio instrumentation, Dark Energy, large-scale structure, the Cosmic Microwave Background, the interstellar medium, galaxy evolution, cosmic magnetism and time-domain science. The Dunlap Institute, together with the Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics, the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, and the Centre for Planetary Sciences, comprise the leading research centre for astronomy in Canada, at the leading research university in the country. The Dunlap Institute is committed to making its science, training and public outreach activities productive and enjoyable for everyone, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, nationality or religion. ###

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – After analyzing four years of Kepler space telescope observations, astronomers from the University of Toronto have given us our clearest understanding yet of a class of exoplanets called “Warm Jupiters”, showing that many have unexpected planetary companions. The team’s analysis, published July 10th in the Astrophysical Journal, provides strong evidence of the existence of two distinct types of Warm Jupiters, each with their own formation and dynamical history. The two types include those that have companions and thus, likely formed where we find them today; and those with no companions that likely migrated to their current positions. According to lead-author Chelsea Huang, a Dunlap Fellow at the Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics, University of Toronto, “Our findings suggest that a big fraction of Warm Jupiters cannot have migrated to their current positions dynamically and that it would be a good idea to consider more seriously that they formed where we find them.” Warm Jupiters are large, gas-giant exoplanets—planets found around stars other than the Sun. They are comparable in size to the gas-giants in our Solar System. But unlike the Sun’s family of giant planets, Warm Jupiters orbit their parent stars at roughly the same distance that Mercury, Venus and the Earth circle the Sun. They take 10 to two hundred days to complete a single orbit. Because of their proximity to their parent stars, they are warmer than our system’s cold gas giants—though not as hot as Hot Jupiters, which are typically closer to their parent stars than Mercury. It has generally been thought that Warm Jupiters didn’t form where we find them today; they are too close to their parent stars to have accumulated large, gas-giant-like atmospheres. So, it appeared likely that they formed in the outer reaches of their planetary systems and migrated inward to their current positions, and might in fact continue their inward journey to become Hot Jupiters. On such a migration, the gravity of any Warm Jupiter would have disturbed neighbouring or companion planets, ejecting them from the system. But, instead of finding “lonely”, companion-less Warm Jupiters, the team found that 11 of the 27 targets they studied have companions ranging in size from Earth-like to Neptune-like. “And when we take into account that there is more analysis to come,” says Huang, “the number of Warm Jupiters with smaller neighbours may be even higher. We may find that more than half have companions.” For full release, contact information, paper and photographs: http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/warm-jupiters-not-as-lonely-as-expected/ -30- For more information: U of T Media Relations 416-978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – A University of Toronto-led team has reported the discovery of a new lizard in the middle of the most- visited island in the Caribbean, strengthening a long-held theory that communities of lizards can evolve almost identically on separate islands. The chameleon-like lizard – a Greater Antillean anole dubbed Anolis landestoyi for the naturalist who first spotted and photographed it – is one of the first new anole species found in the Dominican Republic in decades. “As soon as I saw the pictures, I thought, 'I need to buy a plane ticket,'” says Luke Mahler of U of T’s Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and lead author of an article on the discovery published today online in The American Naturalist. “Our immediate thought was that this looks like something that's supposed to be in Cuba, not in Hispaniola – the island that Haiti and the Dominican Republic share,” says Mahler. “We haven't really seen any completely new species here since the early 1980s.” What's more, the new species could help piece together a long-standing puzzle of similar looking species that exist on different Caribbean islands. “I got a grainy photo from local naturalist Miguel Landestoy, who saw a nesting pair of birds that were mobbing a branch,” says Mahler. “He saw they were flying around what he thought was a new species of heavily camouflaged anole clinging to that branch.” It wasn’t possible to say much from the photo though, and Mahler didn’t think much of it. “You get all these people who say they found a new species but it's almost always just an atypical individual of a very common species,” says Mahler. “So you get pretty hardened against thinking claims like these are legit.” A few years after the initial photo, Landestoy caught one of the lizards and emailed clear images of the find to Mahler and several other researchers he'd been working with. “As soon as I opened the email, I thought 'what on earth is that!?,'” says Mahler. Well-studied ecologically, Greater Antillean anoles are a textbook example of a phenomenon known as replicated adaptive radiation, where related species evolving on different islands diversify into similar sets of species that occupy the same ecological niches. Examples of this could be long-tailed grass dwellers, bright green canopy lizards, and stocky brown species that perch low on tree trunks, each living in similar environments on more than one island. Although most Greater Antillean anoles may have a matching counterpart on another island, scientists have long known that a sizeable fraction do not – roughly one fifth of the region’s anole species are ‘exceptions to the rule’ so far. Most noticeable among these unique lizards are Cuban anoles from the Chamaeleolis group. Chamaeleolis anoles look less like typical anoles and more like chameleons: large, cryptic, slow-moving, and prone to clinging to lichen-covered branches high in forest canopies. Scientists believed there was nothing like these Cuban lizards on the other Greater Antillean islands. Anolis landestoyi was found in the Dominican Republic but bears a strong resemblance to Cuba's Chamaeleolis anoles. The new discovery suggests that there may be fewer exceptions to this island evolution rule than the science community previously appreciated. “Like the discovery of a missing puzzle piece, Anolis landestoyi clarifies our view of replicated adaptive radiation in anoles,” says Mahler, noting that the discovery adds new support for the idea that the buildup of ecological communities on islands can be surprisingly predictable. Though new to science, Anolis landestoyi is already at risk. The new species is restricted to a unique habitat only found in a small area in the western Dominican Republic that is rapidly disappearing due to illegal deforestation. Mahler, who also works with the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), hopes that the new discovery will help to bring attention to conservation issues in the region. Next for Mahler and team is to figure out if Anolis landestoyi evolved on Hispaniola to be strikingly similar to Cuba's Chamaeleolis anoles or if the similarity is due to shared ancestry. The new species and Chamaeleolis are close relatives, but are not next of kin. “We don't know if it's convergence or the fact that it’s pretty closely related to Chamaeleolis, which may have colonized Hispaniola from Cuba,” says Mahler. “But either way, things are more similar across these two islands than we thought.” “I always wanted to describe a new species,” says Mahler. “Doing so is the fulfillment of a dream I've had since I was a little kid.” The study titled “Discovery of a Giant Chameleon-Like Lizard (Anolis) on Hispaniola and Its Significance to Understanding Replicated Adaptive Radiations” was published online ahead of print in The American Naturalist. Support for the research was provided by the National Science Foundation and Harvard University’s David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies. - 30 - MEDIA CONTACTS: Luke Mahler Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology University of Toronto Tel: 647-609-3766 (c) and 615-419-8952 (c) Email: luke.mahler@utoronto.ca Sean Bettam Communications, Faculty of Arts & Science University of Toronto Tel: 416-946-7950 Email: s.bettam@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – Super-computer modelling of Earth's crust and upper-mantle suggests that ancient geologic events may have left deep 'scars' that can come to life to play a role in earthquakes, mountain formation, and other ongoing processes on our planet. This changes the widespread view that only interactions at the boundaries between continent-sized tectonic plates could be responsible for such events. A team of researchers from the University of Toronto and the University of Aberdeen have created models indicating that former plate boundaries may stay hidden deep beneath the Earth’s surface. These multi-million-year-old structures, situated at sites away from existing plate boundaries,  may trigger changes in the structure and properties at the surface in the interior regions of continents. "This is a potentially major revision to the fundamental idea of plate tectonics," says lead author Philip Heron, a postdoctoral fellow in Russell Pysklywec’s research group in U of T’s Department of Earth Sciences. Their paper, "Lasting mantle scars lead to perennial plate tectonics," appears in the June 10, 2016 edition of Nature Communications. A new map of Earth's ancient geology Heron and Pysklywec, together with University of Aberdeen geologist Randell Stephenson have even proposed a 'perennial plate tectonic map' of the Earth to help illustrate how ancient processes may have present-day implications. "It’s based on the familiar global tectonic map that is taught starting in elementary school," says Pysklywec, who is also chair of U of T’s Department of Earth Sciences. "What our models redefine and show on the map are dormant, hidden, ancient plate boundaries that could also be enduring or “perennial” sites of past and active plate tectonic activity." To demonstrate the dominating effects that anomalies below the Earth's crust can have on shallow geological features, the researchers used U of T’s SciNet – home to Canada's most powerful computer and one of the most powerful in the world– to make numerical models of the crust and upper-mantle  into which they could introduce these scar-like anomalies. Simulating yesterday's continents The team essentially created an evolving “virtual Earth” to explore how such geodynamic models develop under different conditions. "For these sorts of simulations, you need to go to a pretty high-resolution to understand what's going on beneath the surface," says Heron. "We modeled 1,500 kilometres across and 600 kilometres deep, but some parts of these structures could be just two or three kilometres wide. It is important to accurately resolve the smaller-scale stresses and strains." Using these models, the team found that different parts of the mantle below the Earth’s crust may control the folding, breaking, or flowing of the Earth's crust within plates – in the form of mountain-building and seismic activity – when under compression. In this way, the mantle structures dominate over shallower structures in the crust that had previously been seen as the main cause of such deformation within plates. "The mantle is like the thermal engine of the planet and the crust is an eggshell above," says Pysklywec. "We're looking at the enigmatic and largely unexplored realm in the Earth where these two regions meet." An Earth in hibernation "Most of the really big plate tectonic activity happens on the plate boundaries, like when India rammed into Asia to create the Himalayas or how the Atlantic opened to split North America from Europe," says Heron. "But there are lots of things we couldn't explain, like seismic activity and mountain-building away from plate boundaries in continent interiors." The research team believes their simulations show that these mantle anomalies are generated through ancient plate tectonic processes, such as the closing of ancient oceans, and can remain hidden at sites away from normal plate boundaries until reactivation generates tectonic folding, breaking, or flowing in plate interiors. "Future exploration of what lies in the mantle beneath the crust may lead to further such discoveries on how our planet works,  generating a greater understanding of how the past may affect our geologic future," says Heron. The research carries on the legacy of J. Tuzo Wilson, also a U of T scientist, and a legendary figure in geosciences who pioneered the idea of plate tectonics in the 1960’s. "Plate tectonics is really the cornerstone of all geoscience," says Pysklywec. "Ultimately, this information could even lead to ways to help better predict how and when earthquakes happen. It's a key building block." - 30 - MEDIA CONTACTS: Philip Heron Department of Earth Sciences University of Toronto Tel: 0044-7857688947 Email: philip.heron@utoronto.ca Russell Pysklywec Department of Earth Sciences University of Toronto Tel: 416-978-3021 (W) Tel: 416-537-2683 (M) Email: russ@es.utoronto.ca Sean Bettam Communications, Faculty of Arts & Science University of Toronto Tel: 416-946-7950 Email: s.bettam@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – University of Toronto Professor Giovanni Grasselli, of the Department of Civil Engineering, has been named the inaugural holder of the Foundation CMG Industrial Research Chair in Fundamental Petroleum Rock Physics and Rock Mechanics. Professor Grasselli is joining 12 chairs at 12 universities, including Penn State and the University of Texas in Austin, in 6 countries that are funded by the Canadian non-profit organization to investigate leading edge research and innovation in oil and gas reservoir modelling. In addition to funding Grasselli’s chair, Foundation CMG’s $1.35-million contribution will be used as seed funding toward the development of a new centre of excellence at U of T over the next five years. By combining fundamental principles of rock physics and rock mechanics with seismic imaging, the centre will produce research and develop technology for smarter, unconventional petroleum production, while reducing the environmental impacts and contributing towards safer field operations. Foundation CMG’s support will catalyze research collaboration between existing experts at the University of Toronto, creating the necessary critical mass to successfully tackle the development of  a sound physical-based and fully verified geomechanical modelling approach to simulate hydraulic fracturing in shale and tight oil and gas reservoirs. About Foundation CMG Foundation CMG’s mission is to promote and fund university research in oil and gas reservoir simulation with industry collaboration and technology transfer. Computer Modelling Group formed in 1978 in the Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department at University of Calgary with the objective to carry out research in computer simulation and to develop leading edge reservoir simulation software for the petroleum industry. In 1997 the company was divided into a newly created publicly traded company, CMGL, and a not-for-profit organization, Foundation CMG. Foundation CMG promotes and financially supports research and development and students through research grants at universities with leading research programs focused on reservoir simulation. Foundation CMG’s vision is to be the catalyst for investment of $700 million toward the training of 5,000 graduate students working on reservoir simulation research topics over a period of 25 years. Foundation CMG partners with government, industry and universities to drive unique multi-year renewable support of student education and world-leading researchers at universities, in Europe, Asia, South America and North America. -30- For more information: U of T Media Relations 416-978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – More than 1,400 students from Grades 3-8 will descend on the University of Toronto on Friday, May 13 for Innovate U, a massive day of hands-on activities celebrating science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) and the power of innovation. The one-day event is a first-of-its-kind partnership between U of T Engineering, Google Canada and Actua, Canada’s largest STEM outreach charity. Innovate U will engage youth in activities where they are engineering, building and inventing their own innovations and technology – from robotics and genetics to rollercoasters and video games. Students and teachers from 45 classes across the Greater Toronto Area will peek under the surface of today’s tech, including smartphones, 3D printers and solar cars, to understand how they work—all while experiencing the post-secondary environment in a fun and accessible way. “Engineers are the innovators, makers and creators solving the world’s greatest challenges, from writing code that controls rovers on Mars, to designing robots that perform surgery on your cells,” says Dawn Britton, director of outreach for U of T Engineering. “We want to show students that technology doesn’t just come in a box — anyone can learn the skills you need to make it work better, go faster, or even invent something totally new.” The day kicks off with a talk from innovator and young entrepreneur Ann Makosinski. Her first toy was a box of transistors, and she’s been creating ever since — in 2013 she won the global Google Science Fair for inventing the ‘Hollow Flashlight’, which uses the thermoelectric effect to convert radiant body heat into electricity, and in 2014 was named one of TIME’s 30 Under 30. Students will participate in a series of one-hour workshops exploring the basics of coding, playing with circuitry and learning about polymers by making slime. They will also have the chance to visit the Innovation Centre, featuring exhibits and demonstrations including a student-built Indy 500 race car, Google Cardboard, 3D Selfies, Code Created Music and more. "The aim behind Innovate U is to inspire Canada's next generation of technology builders," said Sam Sebastian, Managing Director of Google Canada. "Ninety-eight percent of Google engineers had some level of exposure to computer science and technology before entering university. Events like today will help Canadian children understand that computer science is not simply the language of ones and zeros. It's the language of creativity, entrepreneurship and Canada’s future potential." Actua CEO Jennifer Flanagan added, “Actua is happy to be supporting Innovate U. It not only prepares youth to be the STEM professionals of tomorrow but shows them they have the skills and capacity to innovate today.” About the University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering The University of Toronto’s Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering is the premier engineering school in Canada and among the best in the world. Through excellence in engineering education and research, we prepare the next generation of global engineering leaders and innovators to address the world’s most critical challenges. Through our outreach programs, more than 7,000 elementary and high school students of all backgrounds are inspired by science, technology, engineering and math each year. About Google Canada Google’s mission is to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful.  As a global technology leader, Google’s innovations in web search and advertising have made its website a top internet property and its brand one of the most recognized in the world. Google Canada has offices in Waterloo, Toronto, Montreal, and Ottawa with over 400 'Canooglers' working on teams across Engineering, Sales, Marketing, PR, Policy, and HR. Engineers at Google Canada work on many of company's core products including Chrome, Safe Browsing, and Gmail; while the Sales Teams assist Canadian businesses with their digital advertising strategies. About Actua Actua is Canada’s leading science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) youth outreach network representing 33 university and college based members. Over 3 million young Canadians have been inspired through their participation in Actua’s hands on educational workshops, camps and community outreach initiatives. Each year, Actua’s growing network of member organizations reach over 250,000 young Canadians in over 500 communities nationwide. At the national level Actua focuses on the engagement of underrepresented audiences through specialized programs for Indigenous youth, girls and young women, at-risk youth and youth living in Northern and remote communities. Actua’s major funders include: Google Canada, Suncor Energy Foundation, GE Canada and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. For more information about Actua, visit actua.ca. -30- For more information: U of T Media Relations 416-978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.