Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized arthropod – a ubiquitous group of invertebrate animals with segmented limbs and hardened exoskeletons. Tokummia documents for the first time in detail the anatomy of early “mandibulates”, a hyperdiverse sub-group of arthropods which possess a pair of specialized appendages known as mandibles, used to grasp, crush and cut their food. Mandibulates include millions of species and represent one of the greatest evolutionary and ecological success stories of life on Earth. “In spite of their colossal diversity today, the origin of mandibulates had largely remained a mystery,” said Cédric Aria, lead author of the study and recent graduate of the PhD program in the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology at U of T, now working as a post-doctoral researcher at the Nanjing Institute for Geology and Palaeontology, in China. “Before now we’ve had only sparse hints at what the first arthropods with mandibles could have looked like, and no idea of what could have been the other key characteristics that triggered the unrivalled diversification of that group.” Tokummia lived in a tropical sea teeming with life and was among the largest Cambrian predators, exceeding 10 cm in length fully extended. An occasional swimmer, the researchers conclude its robust anterior legs made it a preferred bottom-dweller, as lobsters or mantis shrimps today. Specimens come from 508 million-year-old sedimentary rocks near Marble Canyon in Kootenay national park, British Columbia. Most specimens at the basis of this study were collected during extensive ROM-led fieldwork activities in 2014. “This spectacular new predator, one of the largest and best preserved soft-bodied arthropods from Marble Canyon, joins the ranks of many unusual marine creatures that lived during the Cambrian Explosion, a period of rapid evolutionary change starting about half a billion years ago when most major animal groups first emerged in the fossil record,” said co-author Jean-Bernard Caron, senior curator of invertebrate paleontology at the ROM and an associate professor in the Departments of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and Earth Sciences at U of T. Analysis of several fossil specimens, following careful mechanical preparation and photographic work at the ROM, showed that Tokummia sported broad serrated mandibles as well as large but specialized anterior claws, called maxillipeds, which are typical features of modern mandibulates. “The pincers of Tokummia are large, yet also delicate and complex, reminding us of the shape of a can opener, with their couple of terminal teeth on one claw, and the other claw being curved towards them,” said Aria. “But we think they might have been too fragile to be handling shelly animals, and might have been better adapted to the capture of sizable soft prey items, perhaps hiding away in mud. Once torn apart by the spiny limb bases under the trunk, the mandibles would have served as a revolutionary tool to cut the flesh into small, easily digestible pieces.” The body of Tokummia is made of more than 50 small segments covered by a broad two-piece shell-like structure called a bivalved carapace. Importantly, the animal bears subdivided limb bases with tiny projections called endites, which can be found in the larvae of certain crustaceans and are now thought to have been critical innovations for the evolution of the various legs of mandibulates, and even for the mandibles themselves. The many-segmented body is otherwise reminiscent of myriapods, a group that includes centipedes, millipedes, and their relatives. “Tokummia also lacks the typical second antenna found in crustaceans, which illustrates a very surprising convergence with such terrestrial mandibulates,” said Aria. The study also resolves the affinities of other emblematic fossils from Canada’s Burgess Shale more than a hundred years after their discovery. “Our study suggests that a number of other Burgess Shale fossils such as Branchiocaris, Canadaspis and Odaraia form with Tokummia a group of crustacean-like arthropods that we can now place at the base of all mandibulates,” said Aria. The animal was named after Tokumm Creek, which flows through Marble Canyon in northern Kootenay National Park, and the Greek for “seizing”. The Marble Canyon fossil deposit was first discovered in 2012 during prospection work led by the Royal Ontario Museum and is part of the Burgess Shale fossil deposit, which extends to the north into Yoho National Park in the Canadian Rockies. All specimens are held in the collections of the Royal Ontario Museum on behalf of Parks Canada. The Burgess Shale fossil sites are located within Yoho and Kootenay national parks in British Columbia. The Burgess Shale was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1980. Parks Canada is proud to protect these globally significant palaeontological sites, and to work with leading scientific researchers to expand knowledge and understanding of this key period of earth history. New information from ongoing scientific research is continually incorporated into Parks Canada's Burgess Shale education and interpretation programs, which include guided hikes to these outstanding fossil sites. The findings are described in the paper “'Burgess Shale fossils illustrate the origin of the mandibulate body plan”. Funding for the research was provided primarily by a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Discovery Grant (#341944) to Caron, and Royal Ontario Museum fieldwork grants. – 30 – Notes to media: 1) The paper will appear online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature22080 after the embargo lifts. MEDIA CONTACTS: Cédric Aria (bilingual – English-French) Post-doctoral researcher Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology cedric.aria@protonmail.com +86 153 7100 2536 (mobile) (GMT +8) Skype ID: c.aria Alternate contact: Fangchen Zhao  +86 137 7053 0436 (mobile), +86 25 8328 2176 (desk) (GMT +8) Jean-Bernard Caron (bilingual – English-French) Senior Curator of Invertebrate Palaeontology, Royal Ontario Museum and Associate Professor, Departments of Earth Sciences and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology University of Toronto jcaron@rom.on.ca (preferred mode of communication) 416 586 5593 (desk) Sean BettamCommunications, Faculty of Arts & Science University of Toronto 416 946 7950 (desk) s.bettam@utoronto.ca David McKay Communications Coordinator Royal Ontario Museum 416 586 5559 (desk) davidm@rom.on.ca Tania Peters Public Relations and Communications Officer Parks Canada +1 250 343 2005 Tania.Peters@pc.gc.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

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June 5, 2017

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Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

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Toronto, ON – At the Japan-Canada Summit Meeting in May 2016, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe noted that Japan wished to support Japanese studies at Canadian universities in order to promote mutual understanding between the two countries. Today, based upon this commitment, the Government of Japan is conferring US$5 million on the University of Toronto to establish an endowed chair in Japanese politics and global affairs, and to launch a Centre for the Study of Global Japan. The University of Toronto is the first Canadian university to receive such support from the Government of Japan. The Consul General of Japan in Toronto, Mr. Yasunori Nakayama, says, “At a time when we are experiencing significant changes and instability on the global stage, Japan and Canada, as members of G7 countries that share common values, have a responsibility to make contributions to the world community that ensure peace and prosperity. We also share common challenges such as terrorism, global warming and our aging populations. It is therefore imperative that our academic institutions are able to conduct extensive research that enables us to properly understand each other. The University of Toronto is one of the oldest, biggest and most influential universities in Canada. I am delighted that an institution as prestigious as the University of Toronto now has the means to significantly broaden its study of contemporary Japan with a global perspective.” “The University of Toronto has a keen, long-standing interest in Japan, because of its importance on the world stage and the strong political, economic and cultural ties between our two countries,” says U of T President Meric Gertler. “We are deeply honoured, therefore, to have been selected by the Government of Japan for this landmark endowment, which will extend and amplify our impact in the study of Japan as a major global power.” The University of Toronto is home to Canada’s first Department of East Asian Studies and has substantial expertise in the field. The gift will enable the University to recruit a top expert in the politics, diplomacy, security and global affairs of Japan. The chairholder will be cross-appointed to the Department of Political Science and the Munk School of Global Affairs at the Faculty of Arts & Science. In the interim, Professor David Welch will be appointed the inaugural visiting chair. Welch, a professor of political science at the University of Waterloo, holds the Centre for International Governance Innovation Chair of Global Security at the Balsillie School of International Affairs. Professor Louis Pauly, chair of the Department of Political Science, says, “The endowed chair will secure the permanent presence here of a scholar who studies the political dimensions of Japan’s vital contributions to regional and global order.” The chair will also lead the Centre for the Study of Global Japan. The Centre, which will be housed at the Munk School of Global Affairs, will expand teaching, research and public outreach by bringing together scholars of Japan from across the university and beyond, as well as practitioners and others interested in the country and the region. It will organize a permanent lecture and seminar series, anchored by an annual lecture by an eminent analyst of Japanese politics and diplomacy. “The Centre will open up more bilateral opportunities to build strong relationships and lifelong interests in Japanese politics and global affairs,” says Professor Stephen Toope, director of the Munk School of Global Affairs. “This partnership will ensure that the University is able to promote and disseminate knowledge of contemporary Japan to the next generation of leaders, especially important during this time of dramatic change.” - 30 - MEDIA CONTACTS Professor Louis Pauly Chair, Department of Political Science University of Toronto louis.pauly@utoronto.ca 416-978-6385 Professor Stephen Toope Director, Munk School of Global Affairs University of Toronto stephen.toope@utoronto.ca 416-946-8450 Diana Kuprel Director, Advancement Communications Faculty of Arts & Science d.kuprel@utoronto.ca 416-946-3118 Rui Umezawa Chief Advisor to the Consul General Consulate General of Japan rui.umezawa@to.mofa.go.jp 416-306-1850

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

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June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

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Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

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June 5, 2017

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Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

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CBC News | July 22, 2017

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Toronto, ON – Kevin Han, Jun Ran Xu, Haleema Khan and Sabrina Cruz have been named University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,500 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $80,000 each. Since inception, 220 students have received this celebrated scholarship. Kevin Han, 18, is a recipient of the $80,000 Schulich Leader Scholarship. A graduate of Dr. Frank J. Hayden Secondary School in Burlington, Ontario, Han will be entering the Faculty of the Applied Science and Engineering program this fall. Jun Ran Xu, 18, is a recipient of the $80,000 Schulich Leader Scholarship. A graduate of Aurora High School in Aurora, Ontario, Xu will be entering the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering program this fall. Haleema Khan, 18, is a recipient of the $60,000 Schulich Leader Scholarship. A graduate of Westlane Secondary School in Niagara Falls, Ontario, Khan will be entering the Life Sciences program at the Faculty of Arts and Science Victoria College this fall. She will be a Victoria College student. Sabrina Cruz, 18, is a recipient of the $60,000 Schulich Leader Scholarship. A graduate of Notre Dame Catholic Secondary School in Ajax, Ontario, Cruz will be entering the Math & Physical Science program at the Faculty of Arts and Sciences this fall. She will be an Innis College student. “It is very important that we support exceptional students that demonstrate great leadership and embrace STEM fields,” said Schulich. “It is an investment not only in their future, but the future of our country. Their pursuits are sure to lead to key innovations in the years ahead.” About Schulich Leader Scholarships Schulich Leader Scholarships are prestigious entrance scholarships awarded to high school graduates enrolling in a Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics (STEM) undergraduate program at participating universities in Canada and Israel. Recognizing the increasing importance and impact that STEM disciplines will have on the prosperity of future generations, businessman and philanthropist Seymour Schulich established this $100 million scholarship fund in 2011 to encourage our best and brightest students to be the next pioneers of global scientific research and innovation. This program awards 100 scholarships annually, valued at more than $5.5 million. Schulich Leaders can devote their full time and attention to their studies, as all of their financial needs are covered over the course of their degree. As a result, many of our highest potential students are winning these scholarships and will make great contributions to society. -30- For more information: www.schulichleaders.com For media inquiries contact: Farida Adam Student Awards Officer University Advancement Tel: 416-978-5701 farida.adam@utoronto.ca www.adm.utoronto.ca Or David Goodman dgoodman@schulichfoundation.org 647-289-1950 Dara Newton dnewton@uja.schulichleaders.com 416-480-6492

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

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July 12, 2017

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June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – Every year, humans advance climate change and global warming – and quite likely our own eventual extinction – by injecting about 30 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO₂) into the atmosphere. A team of scientists from the University of Toronto (U of T) believes they’ve found a way to convert all these emissions into energy-rich fuel in a carbon-neutral cycle that uses a very abundant natural resource: silicon. Silicon, readily available in sand, is the seventh most-abundant element in the universe and the second most-abundant element in the earth’s crust. The idea of converting CO₂ emissions to energy isn’t new: there’s been a global race to discover a material that can efficiently convert sunlight, carbon dioxide and water or hydrogen to fuel for decades.  However, the chemical stability of CO₂ has made it difficult to find a practical solution. “A chemistry solution to climate change requires a material that is a highly active and selective catalyst to enable the conversion of CO₂ to fuel. It also needs to be made of elements that are low cost, non-toxic and readily available,” said Geoffrey Ozin, a chemistry professor in U of T’s Faculty of Arts & Science, the Canada Research Chair in Materials Chemistry and lead of U of T’s Solar Fuels Research Cluster. In an article in Nature Communications published August 23, Ozin and colleagues report silicon nanocrystals that meet all the criteria. The hydride-terminated silicon nanocrystals – nanostructured hydrides for short – have an average diameter of 3.5 nanometres and feature a surface area and optical absorption strength sufficient to efficiently harvest the near-infrared, visible and ultraviolet wavelengths of light from the sun together with a powerful chemical-reducing agent on the surface that efficiently and selectively converts gaseous carbon dioxide to gaseous carbon monoxide. The potential result: energy without harmful emissions. “Making use of the reducing power of nanostructured hydrides is a conceptually distinct and commercially interesting strategy for making fuels directly from sunlight,” said Ozin. The U of T Solar Fuels Research Cluster is working to find ways and means to increase the activity, enhance the scale, and boost the rate of production. Their goal is a laboratory demonstration unit and, if successful, a pilot solar refinery. In addition to Ozin, collaborators on the paper include:
  • Le He, Chenxi Qian, Laura Reyes, Wei Sun and P.Y. Wong – Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts & Science;
  • Abdinoor Jelle and Jia Jia – Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts & Science, and Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering;
  • Kulbir Kaur Ghuman, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering;
  • Chandra Veer Singh – Department of Materials Science & Engineering and Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering;
  • Charles A. Mims, Paul G. O’Brien and Thomas E. Wood – Department of Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, and Solar Fuels Research Cluster;
  • Amr S. Helmy – Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering.
- 30 - MEDIA CONTACTS: Geoffrey Ozin Solar Fuels Research Cluster Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts & Science University of Toronto gozin@chem.utoronto.ca (011) 49 721 354 4601 SKYPE, Facetime – please email gozin@chem.utoronto.ca to arrange. *For scheduling purposes, please note Professor Geoffrey Ozin’s whereabouts in the days ahead:
  • Germany from Aug. 25-31 on Central European Summer Time (6 hours ahead of North American Eastern Daylight Time).
Wei Sun Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts & Science University of Toronto wsun@chem.utoronto.ca Sean Bettam Department of Communications, Faculty of Arts & Science University of Toronto s.bettam@utoronto.ca (1) 416 946 7950  

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

Toronto, ON –  In what University of Toronto President Meric Gertler called “an historic investment in Canadian science and innovation,” the federal and provincial governments are joining with the university to provide almost $190 million to upgrade almost half of U of T’s research labs over the next two years. The announcement of the Lab Innovation for Toronto (LIFT) project was made Thursday at U of T’s Medical Sciences Building by President Gertler, federal Innovation, Science and Economic Development Minister Navdeep Bains and Science Minister Kirsty Duncan, and provincial Higher Education Minister Deb Matthews. The university will provide $91.8 million, while the federal and provincial governments will contribute $83.7 million and $14.3 million respectively for a total of $189.8 million. “These investments will us attract and retain talent from around the world and across the country. It’s really critical,” Gertler told reporters in a scrum following the announcement. “We’re very well known as a research powerhouse but as the ministers have said if the [lab research] space is substandard it limits what this talent and faculty and student body can do. By modernizing that space the sky is really the limit.” The LIFT project will lead to the renewal of 47 percent of U of T’s research space, said Scott Mabury, vice-president operations. The labs to be renovated by the project are on average 50-years-old and comprise more than 50,000 square metres of inefficient space, he said. Work has already begun and will be complete by the spring of 2018. Using a square metre as a prop at the event, he gave the appreciative crowd an impromptu lesson in what the scale of the infrastructure project really means. If you add the current inefficient lab space up, he said, it’s equivalent in total size to 15 soccer pitches. And, if U of T was building all-new labs instead of rejuvenating existing facilities, the total cost per square metre would be approximately $12,000, totaling close to $650 million. “The renovations will modernize U of T’s research labs to increase usable space and enhance the quality of the research and learning environment,” Mabury said. “They will also improve air handling, climate and electrical systems.” The federal contribution is part of the government’s Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund, Bains said. “This once-in-a-generation investment by the Government of Canada is a historic down payment on the government’s vision to position Canada as a global centre for innovation,” he said, adding that the funding would “create the conditions for innovation and long-term growth that will keep the Canadian economy globally competitive.” Duncan, who has had first-hand experience of U of T lab facilities as both a student and instructor, agreed. “It’s a little extra special to be here today. I’m a proud UC graduate and a former faculty member . . . being back at the university is bringing back wonderful memories,” she told the crowd. “Science has a central role in [Canada’s] Innovation Agenda . . . Through investments such as these, we are strengthening the foundation for building Canada as a global leader in scientific excellence.” “Through investments such as these, we are strengthening the foundation for building Canada as a global leader in scientific excellence.” Deb Matthews, Ontario's minister of advanced education and skills development, said: “Our government is proud to support this important project, which will give University of Toronto students access to the renewed facilities they need to prepare for successful careers in science and research. We know that providing access to high-quality education and training facilities is critical to building the skilled workforce we need to support good jobs and economic growth for today and tomorrow and this investment will help us to do it.” “The LIFT project will equip our brilliant scholars, students and staff with the cutting-edge facilities they need to learn, collaborate and discover,” President Gertler said as he thanked the federal and provincial ministers. “The modernization of these labs will also reduce our greenhouse gas emissions significantly. The University of Toronto greatly appreciates the federal and provincial governments’ support of postsecondary education and research, and their leadership in ensuring Canada secures its place among global leaders of science and technology.” Daniel Haas, dean of U of T’s Faculty of Dentistry, also thanked the ministers for the infrastructure funding, which will allow the faculty to sustain its excellence and to make much-needed repairs. “Our research facilities are badly outdated,” Haas said. “Our primary building opened 57 years ago in 1959, and a number of our researchers are working out of a facility built in 1927. We have exceptionally talented people who are being limited in what they can accomplish, simply because of infrastructure. The funding announced today will allow our faculty to capitalize on their potential. It will help us modernize our existing facilities and sustain our position as leaders in health research.” The LIFT project will affect all three campuses and nine academic divisions. The facilities to be renovated include not only medical, dental, biology, chemistry and engineering labs, but also include a former horse barn north of Toronto now used for ecological research, a green roof on the historic 1 Spadina Avenue building (the new home of the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design), an electro-acoustic music studio at the Faculty of Music and many others. For example, at the University of Toronto Scarborough, the campus vivarium and the S-Wing research labs will undergo $17.8 million in renovations, while the University of Toronto Mississauga’s Davis Building will get a $17.1 million upgrade. In total, 546 labs will be fully renovated, providing state-of-the-art research facilities to an estimated 1,100 researchers and 5,500 students. Mario Ostrowski is one of those researchers. A renowned HIV scientist affiliated with St. Michael’s Hospital and U of T’s Faculty of Medicine, Ostrowski says there is fierce competition among research institutions for the best graduate students and post-docs. State-of-the-art labs will help U of T recruit the best and the brightest students, he said, and will also inspire existing researchers and students to greater achievements. “Just like great architecture inspires people every day to achieve excellence, if you’ve got a nice lab that’s state of the art, rather than something old and decrepit that’s falling apart, it inspires and stimulates people to produce excellence.” - 30 – For more information, contact: University of Toronto Media Relations Tel: (416) 978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca  

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – High ocean temperatures and poor timing of parasite management likely led to an epidemic of sea lice in 2015 throughout salmon farms in British Columbia's Queen Charlotte Strait, a University of Toronto-led study has found. The sea lice spread to migrating juvenile wild salmon, resulting in the highest numbers of sea lice observed on wild salmon in a decade. In spring of 2015, a team of U of T ecologists led by postdoctoral researchers Andrew Bateman and Stephanie Peacock found that more than 70 per cent of fish the team sampled in the Strait's Broughton Archipelago had at least one sea louse: the highest prevalence of such parasites since 2005. “It was sort of a perfect storm of environmental conditions and mismanagement of treatment,” says Peacock, a postdoctoral fellow in the U of T’s Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology when the research was conducted. “A lot of people talk about how sea lice are natural, but in farms, you have these parasites in larger numbers. Juvenile wild salmon are then exposed as they migrate past these areas.” Because farmed salmon are in open net pens and share water with nearby wild salmon, the parasites can transmit to young wild salmon who wouldn't normally encounter sea lice until later in life. These young fish are sometimes as small as three centimetres in length, while sea lice themselves can be close to one centimetre in diameter. “Getting sea lice at such an early age affects young salmons' health and their ability to fend off predators,” says Peacock. Based on the numbers of lice on juvenile salmon in 2015, researchers predicted an additional 9 - 39 per cent decline in returning pink salmon due to the outbreak. In order to determine the cause of this outbreak, the team assessed the evidence for four contributing factors:
  • influx of lice on returning adult pink salmon
  • sea surface temperature
  • the timing of chemical treatments to control sea lice on salmon farms
  • resistance of sea lice to chemical treatment on farms
“Even though parasite treatments on farms were effective, we saw that treatments failed to protect wild salmon, and this happened at a time of unexpected warming in ocean water in these regions,” says Martin Krkosek, assistant professor in U of T’s Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology. Krkosek was Bateman’s and Peacock's supervisor and study co-author. The fall of 2014 did have a healthy return of adult pink salmon, bringing sea lice into near-shore waters where they could infect farmed salmon. High ocean temperatures during winter months then likely accelerated sea-louse development, enabling populations to grow quickly and reach higher numbers than they would under normal ocean temperatures. Also in 2015, individual salmon farms did not coordinate anti-louse treatments, with some farms delaying treatment until just prior to the time when juvenile salmon migrate past farms. As a result, sea lice from those farms could have spread to adjacent farms, hampering area-wide control of the outbreak. “Furthermore, during the juvenile wild salmon migration, farms are supposed to treat for sea lice within 15 days of when a threshold number of lice are found on adult farmed salmon,” says Peacock. “But in 2015, some farms waited several months before they treated.” “The strategy might have been 'wait until the migration to treat' but it kind of backfired because the louse populations were allowed to grow in the meantime, and the lice spread to other nearby farms. It likely created a bigger problem down the road.” “We were surprised to see that some farms don’t seem to be following their license conditions,” says Peacock. “We thought maybe there were more infractions in 2015 that may have led to higher numbers of sea lice, but when we looked back over 10 -15 years, the rate of such infractions was about the same. The big difference in 2015 really seems to be the combination of a lack of proactive parasite treatment and higher water temperatures.” The team suggested the solution to such an outbreak in the future would likely be an earlier, coordinated parasite treatment effort between salmon farms – something the researchers say is lacking in this area and across the country. “Sea lice used to be a problem a decade or so ago, then parasite management changed and it seemed like the problem had been effectively managed for several years. Then it wasn't managed well all of a sudden,” says Krkosek. “This is a lesson about the importance of better coordinating and timing regional treatment and being aware of warming ocean temperatures." The results of the team's study appear in a paper published in the July edition of the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. This work was supported by Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and Killam postdoctoral fellowships to Bateman, an NSERC Discovery Grant to Mark Lewis at the University of Alberta that supported Peacock, an NSERC Discovery Grant and Sloan Fellowship to Krkosek, a Global Greengrant from the Marisla Foundation, and an infrastructure grant from the Pacific Salmon Foundation. - 30 - MEDIA CONTACTS: Andrew Bateman Postdoctoral Researcher Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology University of Toronto bat3man@gmail.com 1-778-350-9285 Stephanie Peacock Postdoctoral Researcher Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology University of Toronto stephanie.j.peacock@gmail.com 1-778-266-0575 Martin Krkosek Assistant Professor Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology University of Toronto martin.krkosek@utoronto.ca 1-647-923-7780 Larysa Woloszansky Media Relations Officer University of Toronto larysa.woloszansky@utoronto.ca 1-416-978-6974  

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – Two astronomers — with the help of Twitter — have uncovered the strongest evidence yet that an enormous X-shaped structure made of stars lies within the central bulge of the Milky Way Galaxy. Previous computer models, observations of other galaxies, and observations of our own galaxy have suggested that the X-shaped structure existed. But no one had observed it directly; and some astronomers argued that previous research that pointed indirectly to the existence of the X could be explained in other ways. “There was controversy about whether the X-shaped structure existed,” says Dustin Lang, a Research Associate at the Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics, University of Toronto, and co-author of the paper describing the discovery. “But our paper gives a good view of the core of our own galaxy. I think it has provided pretty good evidence for the existence of the X-shaped structure.” The results appear in the July issue of theAstronomical Journal. The lead author is Melissa Ness, a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg. The Milky Way Galaxy is a barred spiral galaxy: a disk-shaped collection of dust, gas and billions of stars, 100,000 light-years in diameter. It is far from a simple disk structure, being comprised of two spiral arms, a bar-shaped feature that runs through its centre, and a central bulge of stars. The central bulge, like other barred galaxy’s bulges, resembles a rectangular box or peanut when viewed—as we view it—from within the plane of the galaxy. The X-shaped structure is an integral component of the bulge. Astronomers think the bulge could have formed in two different ways: it may have formed when the Milky Way Galaxy merged with other galaxies; or it may have formed without the help of external influences as an outgrowth of the bar, which itself forms from the evolving galactic disk. Lang and Ness’s finding supports the latter model which predicts the box- or peanut-shaped bulge and the galactic X. This latest, clearest view of the bulge emerged when Lang re-analyzed previously released data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a space telescope launched by NASA in 2009. Before ending its initial mission in 2011, WISE surveyed the entire sky in infrared—imaging three-quarters of a billion galaxies, stars and asteroids. “The bulge is a key signature of formation of the Milky Way Galaxy,” says Ness. “If we understand the bulge we will understand the key processes that have formed and shaped our galaxy.” “The shape of the bulge tells us about how it has formed. We see the X-shape and boxy morphology so clearly in the WISE image and this demonstrates that internal formation processes have been the ones driving the bulge formation.” It is also evidence that our galaxy did not experience major merging events since the bulge formed. If it had, interactions with other galaxies would have disrupted its shape. Lang’s analysis was originally intended to aid in his research in mapping the web of galaxies beyond the Milky Way Galaxy. To help explore the maps he’d developed from the WISE data, he created an interactive map-browsing website and tweeted an image of the entire sky. “Ness saw the tweet and immediately recognized the importance of the X-shaped structure,” says Lang. “We arranged to meet at an upcoming conference we were both attending. The paper was born from that meeting. That’s the power of large surveys and open science!” Supplementary notes: 1) NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, manages and operates WISE for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The spacecraft was put into hibernation mode in 2011, after it scanned the entire sky twice, thereby completing its main objectives. In September 2013, WISE was reactivated, renamed NEOWISE and assigned a new mission to assist NASA’s efforts to identify potentially hazardous near-Earth objects. For more information on WISE: http://nasa.gov/wise 2) With contributions from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. -30- The X-shaped Bulge of the Milky Way Revealed by WISE: http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/0004-6256/152/1/14 Contact details: Dr. Dustin Lang Research Associate Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics University of Toronto e: lang@dunlap.utoronto.ca Skype: dstndstn Google Chat: dstndstn@gmail.com Twitter: @dstndstn Chris Sasaki Communications Coordinator, Public Information Officer Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics University of Toronto p: 416-978-6613 e: csasaki@dunlap.utoronto.ca w: dunlap.utoronto.ca Dr. Melissa Ness Max Planck Institute for Astronomy Heidelberg, Germany e: ness@mpia-hd.mpg.de Twitter: @melissakness Dr. Markus Poessel Public Relations Max Planck Institute for Astronomy Heidelberg, Germany p: (+49 | 0) 6221 528-261 e: poessel@hda-hd.de Elizabeth Landau Media Relations Specialist NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena, Calif. p: (818) 354-6425 e: elizabeth.landau@jpl.nasa.gov The Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics at the University of Toronto is an endowed research institute with over 40 faculty, postdocs, students and staff, dedicated to innovative technology, groundbreaking research, world-class training, and public engagement. The research themes of its faculty and Dunlap Fellows span the Universe and include: optical, infrared and radio instrumentation, Dark Energy, large-scale structure, the Cosmic Microwave Background, the interstellar medium, galaxy evolution, cosmic magnetism and time-domain science. The Dunlap Institute, together with the Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics, the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, and the Centre for Planetary Sciences, comprise the leading research centre for astronomy in Canada, at the leading research university in the country. The Dunlap Institute is committed to making its science, training and public outreach activities productive and enjoyable for everyone, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, nationality or religion. ###

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – After analyzing four years of Kepler space telescope observations, astronomers from the University of Toronto have given us our clearest understanding yet of a class of exoplanets called “Warm Jupiters”, showing that many have unexpected planetary companions. The team’s analysis, published July 10th in the Astrophysical Journal, provides strong evidence of the existence of two distinct types of Warm Jupiters, each with their own formation and dynamical history. The two types include those that have companions and thus, likely formed where we find them today; and those with no companions that likely migrated to their current positions. According to lead-author Chelsea Huang, a Dunlap Fellow at the Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics, University of Toronto, “Our findings suggest that a big fraction of Warm Jupiters cannot have migrated to their current positions dynamically and that it would be a good idea to consider more seriously that they formed where we find them.” Warm Jupiters are large, gas-giant exoplanets—planets found around stars other than the Sun. They are comparable in size to the gas-giants in our Solar System. But unlike the Sun’s family of giant planets, Warm Jupiters orbit their parent stars at roughly the same distance that Mercury, Venus and the Earth circle the Sun. They take 10 to two hundred days to complete a single orbit. Because of their proximity to their parent stars, they are warmer than our system’s cold gas giants—though not as hot as Hot Jupiters, which are typically closer to their parent stars than Mercury. It has generally been thought that Warm Jupiters didn’t form where we find them today; they are too close to their parent stars to have accumulated large, gas-giant-like atmospheres. So, it appeared likely that they formed in the outer reaches of their planetary systems and migrated inward to their current positions, and might in fact continue their inward journey to become Hot Jupiters. On such a migration, the gravity of any Warm Jupiter would have disturbed neighbouring or companion planets, ejecting them from the system. But, instead of finding “lonely”, companion-less Warm Jupiters, the team found that 11 of the 27 targets they studied have companions ranging in size from Earth-like to Neptune-like. “And when we take into account that there is more analysis to come,” says Huang, “the number of Warm Jupiters with smaller neighbours may be even higher. We may find that more than half have companions.” For full release, contact information, paper and photographs: http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/warm-jupiters-not-as-lonely-as-expected/ -30- For more information: U of T Media Relations 416-978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – A University of Toronto-led team has reported the discovery of a new lizard in the middle of the most- visited island in the Caribbean, strengthening a long-held theory that communities of lizards can evolve almost identically on separate islands. The chameleon-like lizard – a Greater Antillean anole dubbed Anolis landestoyi for the naturalist who first spotted and photographed it – is one of the first new anole species found in the Dominican Republic in decades. “As soon as I saw the pictures, I thought, 'I need to buy a plane ticket,'” says Luke Mahler of U of T’s Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and lead author of an article on the discovery published today online in The American Naturalist. “Our immediate thought was that this looks like something that's supposed to be in Cuba, not in Hispaniola – the island that Haiti and the Dominican Republic share,” says Mahler. “We haven't really seen any completely new species here since the early 1980s.” What's more, the new species could help piece together a long-standing puzzle of similar looking species that exist on different Caribbean islands. “I got a grainy photo from local naturalist Miguel Landestoy, who saw a nesting pair of birds that were mobbing a branch,” says Mahler. “He saw they were flying around what he thought was a new species of heavily camouflaged anole clinging to that branch.” It wasn’t possible to say much from the photo though, and Mahler didn’t think much of it. “You get all these people who say they found a new species but it's almost always just an atypical individual of a very common species,” says Mahler. “So you get pretty hardened against thinking claims like these are legit.” A few years after the initial photo, Landestoy caught one of the lizards and emailed clear images of the find to Mahler and several other researchers he'd been working with. “As soon as I opened the email, I thought 'what on earth is that!?,'” says Mahler. Well-studied ecologically, Greater Antillean anoles are a textbook example of a phenomenon known as replicated adaptive radiation, where related species evolving on different islands diversify into similar sets of species that occupy the same ecological niches. Examples of this could be long-tailed grass dwellers, bright green canopy lizards, and stocky brown species that perch low on tree trunks, each living in similar environments on more than one island. Although most Greater Antillean anoles may have a matching counterpart on another island, scientists have long known that a sizeable fraction do not – roughly one fifth of the region’s anole species are ‘exceptions to the rule’ so far. Most noticeable among these unique lizards are Cuban anoles from the Chamaeleolis group. Chamaeleolis anoles look less like typical anoles and more like chameleons: large, cryptic, slow-moving, and prone to clinging to lichen-covered branches high in forest canopies. Scientists believed there was nothing like these Cuban lizards on the other Greater Antillean islands. Anolis landestoyi was found in the Dominican Republic but bears a strong resemblance to Cuba's Chamaeleolis anoles. The new discovery suggests that there may be fewer exceptions to this island evolution rule than the science community previously appreciated. “Like the discovery of a missing puzzle piece, Anolis landestoyi clarifies our view of replicated adaptive radiation in anoles,” says Mahler, noting that the discovery adds new support for the idea that the buildup of ecological communities on islands can be surprisingly predictable. Though new to science, Anolis landestoyi is already at risk. The new species is restricted to a unique habitat only found in a small area in the western Dominican Republic that is rapidly disappearing due to illegal deforestation. Mahler, who also works with the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), hopes that the new discovery will help to bring attention to conservation issues in the region. Next for Mahler and team is to figure out if Anolis landestoyi evolved on Hispaniola to be strikingly similar to Cuba's Chamaeleolis anoles or if the similarity is due to shared ancestry. The new species and Chamaeleolis are close relatives, but are not next of kin. “We don't know if it's convergence or the fact that it’s pretty closely related to Chamaeleolis, which may have colonized Hispaniola from Cuba,” says Mahler. “But either way, things are more similar across these two islands than we thought.” “I always wanted to describe a new species,” says Mahler. “Doing so is the fulfillment of a dream I've had since I was a little kid.” The study titled “Discovery of a Giant Chameleon-Like Lizard (Anolis) on Hispaniola and Its Significance to Understanding Replicated Adaptive Radiations” was published online ahead of print in The American Naturalist. Support for the research was provided by the National Science Foundation and Harvard University’s David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies. - 30 - MEDIA CONTACTS: Luke Mahler Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology University of Toronto Tel: 647-609-3766 (c) and 615-419-8952 (c) Email: luke.mahler@utoronto.ca Sean Bettam Communications, Faculty of Arts & Science University of Toronto Tel: 416-946-7950 Email: s.bettam@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – Super-computer modelling of Earth's crust and upper-mantle suggests that ancient geologic events may have left deep 'scars' that can come to life to play a role in earthquakes, mountain formation, and other ongoing processes on our planet. This changes the widespread view that only interactions at the boundaries between continent-sized tectonic plates could be responsible for such events. A team of researchers from the University of Toronto and the University of Aberdeen have created models indicating that former plate boundaries may stay hidden deep beneath the Earth’s surface. These multi-million-year-old structures, situated at sites away from existing plate boundaries,  may trigger changes in the structure and properties at the surface in the interior regions of continents. "This is a potentially major revision to the fundamental idea of plate tectonics," says lead author Philip Heron, a postdoctoral fellow in Russell Pysklywec’s research group in U of T’s Department of Earth Sciences. Their paper, "Lasting mantle scars lead to perennial plate tectonics," appears in the June 10, 2016 edition of Nature Communications. A new map of Earth's ancient geology Heron and Pysklywec, together with University of Aberdeen geologist Randell Stephenson have even proposed a 'perennial plate tectonic map' of the Earth to help illustrate how ancient processes may have present-day implications. "It’s based on the familiar global tectonic map that is taught starting in elementary school," says Pysklywec, who is also chair of U of T’s Department of Earth Sciences. "What our models redefine and show on the map are dormant, hidden, ancient plate boundaries that could also be enduring or “perennial” sites of past and active plate tectonic activity." To demonstrate the dominating effects that anomalies below the Earth's crust can have on shallow geological features, the researchers used U of T’s SciNet – home to Canada's most powerful computer and one of the most powerful in the world– to make numerical models of the crust and upper-mantle  into which they could introduce these scar-like anomalies. Simulating yesterday's continents The team essentially created an evolving “virtual Earth” to explore how such geodynamic models develop under different conditions. "For these sorts of simulations, you need to go to a pretty high-resolution to understand what's going on beneath the surface," says Heron. "We modeled 1,500 kilometres across and 600 kilometres deep, but some parts of these structures could be just two or three kilometres wide. It is important to accurately resolve the smaller-scale stresses and strains." Using these models, the team found that different parts of the mantle below the Earth’s crust may control the folding, breaking, or flowing of the Earth's crust within plates – in the form of mountain-building and seismic activity – when under compression. In this way, the mantle structures dominate over shallower structures in the crust that had previously been seen as the main cause of such deformation within plates. "The mantle is like the thermal engine of the planet and the crust is an eggshell above," says Pysklywec. "We're looking at the enigmatic and largely unexplored realm in the Earth where these two regions meet." An Earth in hibernation "Most of the really big plate tectonic activity happens on the plate boundaries, like when India rammed into Asia to create the Himalayas or how the Atlantic opened to split North America from Europe," says Heron. "But there are lots of things we couldn't explain, like seismic activity and mountain-building away from plate boundaries in continent interiors." The research team believes their simulations show that these mantle anomalies are generated through ancient plate tectonic processes, such as the closing of ancient oceans, and can remain hidden at sites away from normal plate boundaries until reactivation generates tectonic folding, breaking, or flowing in plate interiors. "Future exploration of what lies in the mantle beneath the crust may lead to further such discoveries on how our planet works,  generating a greater understanding of how the past may affect our geologic future," says Heron. The research carries on the legacy of J. Tuzo Wilson, also a U of T scientist, and a legendary figure in geosciences who pioneered the idea of plate tectonics in the 1960’s. "Plate tectonics is really the cornerstone of all geoscience," says Pysklywec. "Ultimately, this information could even lead to ways to help better predict how and when earthquakes happen. It's a key building block." - 30 - MEDIA CONTACTS: Philip Heron Department of Earth Sciences University of Toronto Tel: 0044-7857688947 Email: philip.heron@utoronto.ca Russell Pysklywec Department of Earth Sciences University of Toronto Tel: 416-978-3021 (W) Tel: 416-537-2683 (M) Email: russ@es.utoronto.ca Sean Bettam Communications, Faculty of Arts & Science University of Toronto Tel: 416-946-7950 Email: s.bettam@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – University of Toronto Professor Giovanni Grasselli, of the Department of Civil Engineering, has been named the inaugural holder of the Foundation CMG Industrial Research Chair in Fundamental Petroleum Rock Physics and Rock Mechanics. Professor Grasselli is joining 12 chairs at 12 universities, including Penn State and the University of Texas in Austin, in 6 countries that are funded by the Canadian non-profit organization to investigate leading edge research and innovation in oil and gas reservoir modelling. In addition to funding Grasselli’s chair, Foundation CMG’s $1.35-million contribution will be used as seed funding toward the development of a new centre of excellence at U of T over the next five years. By combining fundamental principles of rock physics and rock mechanics with seismic imaging, the centre will produce research and develop technology for smarter, unconventional petroleum production, while reducing the environmental impacts and contributing towards safer field operations. Foundation CMG’s support will catalyze research collaboration between existing experts at the University of Toronto, creating the necessary critical mass to successfully tackle the development of  a sound physical-based and fully verified geomechanical modelling approach to simulate hydraulic fracturing in shale and tight oil and gas reservoirs. About Foundation CMG Foundation CMG’s mission is to promote and fund university research in oil and gas reservoir simulation with industry collaboration and technology transfer. Computer Modelling Group formed in 1978 in the Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department at University of Calgary with the objective to carry out research in computer simulation and to develop leading edge reservoir simulation software for the petroleum industry. In 1997 the company was divided into a newly created publicly traded company, CMGL, and a not-for-profit organization, Foundation CMG. Foundation CMG promotes and financially supports research and development and students through research grants at universities with leading research programs focused on reservoir simulation. Foundation CMG’s vision is to be the catalyst for investment of $700 million toward the training of 5,000 graduate students working on reservoir simulation research topics over a period of 25 years. Foundation CMG partners with government, industry and universities to drive unique multi-year renewable support of student education and world-leading researchers at universities, in Europe, Asia, South America and North America. -30- For more information: U of T Media Relations 416-978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – More than 1,400 students from Grades 3-8 will descend on the University of Toronto on Friday, May 13 for Innovate U, a massive day of hands-on activities celebrating science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) and the power of innovation. The one-day event is a first-of-its-kind partnership between U of T Engineering, Google Canada and Actua, Canada’s largest STEM outreach charity. Innovate U will engage youth in activities where they are engineering, building and inventing their own innovations and technology – from robotics and genetics to rollercoasters and video games. Students and teachers from 45 classes across the Greater Toronto Area will peek under the surface of today’s tech, including smartphones, 3D printers and solar cars, to understand how they work—all while experiencing the post-secondary environment in a fun and accessible way. “Engineers are the innovators, makers and creators solving the world’s greatest challenges, from writing code that controls rovers on Mars, to designing robots that perform surgery on your cells,” says Dawn Britton, director of outreach for U of T Engineering. “We want to show students that technology doesn’t just come in a box — anyone can learn the skills you need to make it work better, go faster, or even invent something totally new.” The day kicks off with a talk from innovator and young entrepreneur Ann Makosinski. Her first toy was a box of transistors, and she’s been creating ever since — in 2013 she won the global Google Science Fair for inventing the ‘Hollow Flashlight’, which uses the thermoelectric effect to convert radiant body heat into electricity, and in 2014 was named one of TIME’s 30 Under 30. Students will participate in a series of one-hour workshops exploring the basics of coding, playing with circuitry and learning about polymers by making slime. They will also have the chance to visit the Innovation Centre, featuring exhibits and demonstrations including a student-built Indy 500 race car, Google Cardboard, 3D Selfies, Code Created Music and more. "The aim behind Innovate U is to inspire Canada's next generation of technology builders," said Sam Sebastian, Managing Director of Google Canada. "Ninety-eight percent of Google engineers had some level of exposure to computer science and technology before entering university. Events like today will help Canadian children understand that computer science is not simply the language of ones and zeros. It's the language of creativity, entrepreneurship and Canada’s future potential." Actua CEO Jennifer Flanagan added, “Actua is happy to be supporting Innovate U. It not only prepares youth to be the STEM professionals of tomorrow but shows them they have the skills and capacity to innovate today.” About the University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering The University of Toronto’s Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering is the premier engineering school in Canada and among the best in the world. Through excellence in engineering education and research, we prepare the next generation of global engineering leaders and innovators to address the world’s most critical challenges. Through our outreach programs, more than 7,000 elementary and high school students of all backgrounds are inspired by science, technology, engineering and math each year. About Google Canada Google’s mission is to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful.  As a global technology leader, Google’s innovations in web search and advertising have made its website a top internet property and its brand one of the most recognized in the world. Google Canada has offices in Waterloo, Toronto, Montreal, and Ottawa with over 400 'Canooglers' working on teams across Engineering, Sales, Marketing, PR, Policy, and HR. Engineers at Google Canada work on many of company's core products including Chrome, Safe Browsing, and Gmail; while the Sales Teams assist Canadian businesses with their digital advertising strategies. About Actua Actua is Canada’s leading science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) youth outreach network representing 33 university and college based members. Over 3 million young Canadians have been inspired through their participation in Actua’s hands on educational workshops, camps and community outreach initiatives. Each year, Actua’s growing network of member organizations reach over 250,000 young Canadians in over 500 communities nationwide. At the national level Actua focuses on the engagement of underrepresented audiences through specialized programs for Indigenous youth, girls and young women, at-risk youth and youth living in Northern and remote communities. Actua’s major funders include: Google Canada, Suncor Energy Foundation, GE Canada and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. For more information about Actua, visit actua.ca. -30- For more information: U of T Media Relations 416-978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

Dwayne is Director of the Atomically Resolved Dynamics Department of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg, Germany, with a secondary appointment as Professor of Chemistry and Physics at the University of Toronto. Dwayne works to track chemical reactions on the atomic level using ‘atomic movies’, a method of observing the movements of atoms in real time. By doing so he has shown that chemistry can be distilled down to a handful of key atomic motions. This insight will have profound implications for our understanding of biological processes and how to treat disease. He commented: I was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.  Both of my parents grew up on homestead farms in Northwest Ontario and never finished High School.  I was the first in my family to go to University (University of Manitoba). Everyone, no matter what background, can do science and make a difference. The receipt of the RSC Centenary Prize is a career highlight.  It allows the telling of a great story with respect to achieving one of the dream experiments in science and how basic science can lead to major benefits to society in unexpected ways.  It is a great honour for me to achieve this award and to carry the torch for why science matters.” The prize recognises outstanding overseas chemists, who are exceptional communicators, and invites the winners to give lectures in the UK. An illustrious list of 47 previous winners of the Royal Society of Chemistry’s Awards have gone on to win Nobel Prizes for their pioneering work, including Harry Kroto, Fred Sanger and Linus Pauling. Dr Robert Parker, chief executive of the Royal Society of Chemistry said: “It is an honour to recognise the illustrious achievements of our prize and award winners in our 175th anniversary year. “We were founded in 1841 by a group of academics, industrialists and doctors who understood the power of the chemical sciences to change our world for the better. Our winners share that vision and are advancing excellence in their fields, whether through innovative research or inspirational teaching and outreach. “We are proud to celebrate and support the work of inspiring and influential individuals, whose work has the potential to improve so many lives.” Prize winners are evaluated for the originality and impact of their research, as well as the quality of the results which can be shown in publications, patents, or even software. The awards also recognise the importance of teamwork across the chemical sciences, and the abilities of individuals to develop successful collaborations. Rewarding Excellence and Gaining Recognition The Royal Society of Chemistry’s Prizes and Awards recognise achievements by individuals, teams and organisations in advancing the chemical sciences. We want to reward those undertaking excellent work in the chemical sciences from across the world. There are over 60 Prizes and Awards available in the main portfolio, covering all areas of the chemical sciences.  So whether you work in research, business, industry or education, recognition is open to everyone. The Royal Society of Chemistry We are the oldest chemical society in the world and in 2016 we’re celebrating 175 years of progress and people in the chemical sciences. Throughout the year, we’re sharing the stories of how our members past and present have helped to change the world with chemistry. With over 50,000 members and a knowledge business that spans the globe, we are the UK’s professional body for chemical scientists; a not-for-profit organisation with 175 years of history and an international vision of the future. We promote, support and celebrate chemistry. We work to shape the future of the chemical sciences – for the benefit of science and humanity. More information on Royal Society of Chemistry Prizes and Awards http://www.rsc.org/awards-funding/awards -30- For more information: U of T Media Relations 416-978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

Toronto, ON - Imagine telling a patient suffering from age-related (type-II) osteoporosis that a single injection of stem cells could restore their normal bone structure. This week, with a publication in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, a group of researchers from the University of Toronto and The Ottawa Hospital suggest that this scenario may not be too far away. Osteoporosis affects over 200M people worldwide and, unlike post-menopausal (type-I) osteoporosis, both women and men are equally susceptible to developing the age-related (type-II) form of this chronic disease. With age-related osteoporosis, the inner structure of the bone diminishes, leaving the bone thinner, less dense, and losing its function. The disease is responsible for an estimated 8.9 M fractures per year worldwide. Fractures of the hip—one of the most common breaks for those suffering from type-II osteoporosis—lead to a significant lack of mobility and, for some, can be deadly. But how can an injection of stem cells reverse the ravages of age in the bones? Professor William Stanford, senior author of the study, had in previous research demonstrated a causal effect between mice that developed age-related osteoporosis and low or defective mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in these animals. “We reasoned that if defective MSCs are responsible for osteoporosis, transplantation of healthy MSCs should be able to prevent or treat osteoporosis,” said Stanford, who is a Senior Scientist at The Ottawa Hospital and Professor at the University of Ottawa. To test that theory, the researchers injected osteoporotic mice with MSCs from healthy mice. Stem cells are “progenitor” cells, capable of dividing and changing into all the different cell types in the body. Able to become bone cells, MSCs have a second unique feature, ideal for the development of human therapies: these stem cells can be transplanted from one person to another without the need for matching (needed for blood transfusions, for instance) and without being rejected. After six months post-injection, a quarter of the life span of these animals, the osteoporotic bone had astonishingly given way to healthy, functional bone. “We had hoped for a general increase in bone health,” said John E. Davies, Professor at the Faculty of Dentistry and the Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) at the University of Toronto, and a co-author of the study. “But the huge surprise was to find that the exquisite inner “coral-like” architecture of the bone structure of the injected animals—which is severely compromised in osteoporosis—was restored to normal.” The study could soon give rise to a whole new paradigm for treating or even indefinitely postponing the onset of osteoporosis. Currently there is only one commercially available therapy for type-II osteoporosis, a drug that maintains its effectiveness for just two years. And, while there are no human stem cell trials looking at a systemic treatment for osteoporosis, the long-range results of the study point to the possibility that as little as one dose of stem cells might offer long-term relief. “It’s very exciting,” said Dr. Jeff Kiernan, first author of the study. A graduate from IBBME who is beginning a Postdoctoral Fellowship at The Ottawa Hospital with the Centre for Transfusion Research, Kiernan pursued the research for his doctoral degree. “We’re currently conducting ancillary trials with a research group in the U.S., where elderly patients have been injected with MSCs to study various outcomes. We’ll be able to look at those blood samples for biological markers of bone growth and bone reabsorption,” he added. If improvements to bone health are observed in these ancillary trials, according to Stanford, larger dedicated trials could follow within the next 5 years. Stem cells were first discovered in the early 1960s by University of Toronto Professors James E. Till and Earnest McCulloch. UofT continues to be a world leader in stem cell research. Full reference: Systemic Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Transplantation Prevents Functional Bone Loss in a Mouse Model of Age-Related Osteoporosis. Jeffrey Kiernan, Sally Hu, Marc D. Grynpas, John E. Davies, William L. Stanford. Stem Cells Translational Medicine. 2016;5:1–11 Funders: Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Canada Research Chair About the University of Toronto: The University of Toronto has assembled one of the strongest research and teaching faculties in North America, presenting top students at all levels with an intellectual environment unmatched in breadth and depth on any other Canadian campus. U of T faculty co-author more research articles than their colleagues at any university in the US or Canada other than Harvard. As a measure of impact, U of T consistently ranks alongside the top five U.S. universities whose discoveries are most often cited by other researchers around the world.  The U of T faculty are also widely recognized for their teaching strengths and commitment to graduate supervision. Established in 1827, the University of Toronto today operates in downtown Toronto, Mississauga and Scarborough, as well as in nine renowned academic hospitals. About The Ottawa Hospital: The Ottawa Hospital is one of Canada’s largest learning and research hospitals with over 1,100 beds, approximately 12,000 staff and an annual budget of over $1.2 billion. Our focus on research and learning helps us develop new and innovative ways to treat patients and improve care. As a multi-campus hospital, affiliated with the University of Ottawa, we deliver specialized care to the Eastern Ontario region, but our techniques and research discoveries are adopted around the world. We engage the community at all levels to support our vision for better patient care. -30- Media Contacts: Erin Vollick, Communications Officer, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto Erin.vollick@dentistry.utoronto.ca | (416) 979-4900 ext. 4381| (416) 409-4633 (cell) Jennifer Ganton, Director, Communications and Public Relations, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute jganton@ohri.ca |613-798-5555 ext. 73325 |613-614-5253 (cell)

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

Toronto, ON - The University of Toronto welcomes the $15M investment by the Ontario government for the new Centre for Engineering Innovation and Entrepreneurship (CEIE). As stated in the 2016 Ontario Budget introduced today, this investment will support strengthening the Innovation SuperCorridor in Ontario. This Centre will bring together smart building design and state-of-the-art learning technologies, enabling students, faculty, alumni and industry partners to work together in addressing some of Canada's most pressing economic challenges. "We are pleased at this recognition of the University of Toronto's excellence and contribution to the economy through innovation, entrepreneurship and work-integrated learning," said U of T President Professor Meric Gertler.  "With the province's support to develop the Centre for Engineering Innovation and Entrepreneurship, we will be able to accelerate our efforts in these key areas.” The University has raised almost $26 million in donations to support the CEIE including one million dollars from students through the U of T Engineering Society. Designed to support and accelerate economic growth and long-term prosperity in Ontario and Canada, the CEIE will: Help enhance Ontario’s private sector productivity and competitiveness:
  • Modernize the province’s manufacturing sector by generating innovations in robotics and advanced manufacturing;
  • Accelerate entrepreneurship activity leading to the creation of more technology-based start-ups; and,
  • Produce highly qualified graduates in fields of study that are key to Ontario’s and Canada’s economic success.
President Gertler also welcomed continued modernization of the Ontario financial aid system. These changes will help students with the greatest need get better access to grants upfront and increase the amount of financial support. -30- For more information, contact: U of T Media Relations 416-978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca    

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – When one atom first meets another, the precise nature of that interaction can determine much about what kinds of physical properties and behaviours will emerge. In a paper published today in Nature Physics, a team led by U of T physicist Joseph Thywissen reported their discovery of a new set of rules related to one particular type of atomic-pair interaction. The researchers study interactions between atoms that have been cooled close to absolute zero. “Ultracold atoms are the stem cells of materials science,” says Thywissen, a Professor of Physics at the University of Toronto and also a Fellow of the Quantum Materials program at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. “Just as a stem cell can become a fingernail or a heart cell depending on its context, ultracold atoms can become metals, insulators, superfluids or other types of materials.” In collaboration with theorists Shizhong Zhang of Hong Kong University and Zhenhua Yu of Tsinghua University, the Toronto experimentalists have been studying “p-wave interactions.” The term “p-wave” refers to the degree to which two atoms twirl around one another – a phenomenon physicists refer to as “angular momentum.” Researchers study these interactions in a highly controlled environment, coaxing a few hundred thousand gas atoms into a “trap,” and cooling them to about -273 Celsius. If two atoms hit head-on and bounce straight back from one another, it means they have no angular momentum. This interaction is called an s-wave. But if a pair of atoms ricochet off one another with a single unit of angular momentum, the resulting interaction is known as a p-wave. P-waves, s-waves and other types of atom-pair interactions correlate with many types of emergent physical properties. Some rules that govern these relationships are well understood, but those related to p-waves have traditionally defied explanation. “P-wave interactions fascinate scientists because they endow materials with unusual properties and puzzling behaviours,” says Thywissen. “But the conventional wisdom was that gases with p-wave interactions had losses that were too strong to allow you see anything interesting.” Thywissen’s team employed a method called dynamical spectroscopy to prepare and probe atoms faster than had been done in the past. “Our observations took less than a millisecond,” he says. “Previous studies were searching for properties that required longer observation. It allowed us to see something before the losses became too significant.” Their orthodoxy-challenging experiments resulted more from serendipity than a conviction that there was a problem with conventional wisdom. “We ended up looking at this because a junior graduate student working in our lab didn’t know to avoid the p-wave resonances. He took spectroscopy data on them,” Thywissen says. “Nature surprised us. There was a beautiful spectroscopic signal of a new kind of pressure that was due to p-wave interactions.” Their subsequent observations sparked a flurry of activity among theoretical physicists, resulting in several new papers that attempted to explain this pressure. If correct, this theoretical work provides a new set of guidelines outlining how to understand any state of matter that emerges from p-wave interactions. This work can help scientists better understand the fundamental question of where material properties come from. It can also make it possible to create and work with new materials that have highly unusual – and potentially very valuable – properties. P-waves, for instance, correlate with unusual forms of superconductivity and superfluidity, in which particles flow without resistance. Such materials have vexed scientists for years. “When made up of p-wave pairs, superconductors and superfluids should also have something called an edge current – but we know from observation that these edge currents are absent or extremely weak. We don’t understand this,” says Thywissen. “We hope the new relations we’ve discovered will help us figure out why.” Thywissen and his collaborators are already designing new experiments designed to tune and tweak the environment, creating an ever more sophisticated understanding of how material properties emerge. “Even though this experiment looks complex now, we will continue to work to push the limits of what can be done in the lab,” Thywissen says, “We never know what we’re going to find, but we always have hope of discovering something like this. It is truly thrilling.” The discovery is explained fully in the the study "Evidence for universal relations describing a gas with p-wave interactions" published today in Nature Physics. In addition to Yu, Zhang and Thywissen, the research team includes U of T PhD candidates Christopher Luciuk and Scott Smale, and postdoctoral fellow Stefan Trotzky. - 30 - MEDIA CONTACTS: Josephy H. Thywissen Department of Physics University of Toronto jht@physics.utoronto.ca Sean Bettam Communications, Faculty of Arts & Science University of Toronto Tel: 416-946-7950 s.bettam@utoronto.ca  

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

“We see today that black holes exist in the universe and they do collide!” Associate Professor Harald Pfeiffer says (image courtesy NASA) For the first time, scientists have observed gravitational waves – ripples in the fabric of spacetime from a cataclysmic event in the distant universe, likely the collision of black holes. The discovery, made by the team at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory (LIGO), promises to open a new window into the cosmos. A team of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto played an instrumental role in providing some of the calculations that enabled a successful search for the waves. They’re part of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, a group of more than 1,000 scientists from universities in the United States and 14 other countries. “It is absolutely stunning to see two ground-breaking discoveries at once,” said Associate Professor Harald Pfeiffer, U of T’s lead on the collaboration. “Not only were gravitational waves measured for the very first time passing through Earth, but these waves were caused by astronomical objects that have never been observed before. “We see today that black holes exist in the universe and they do collide!” said Pfeiffer. A scientist at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) at the University of Toronto, Pfeiffer is also a fellow at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) and holder of the Canada Research Chair for Numerical Relativity and Gravitational Wave Astrophysics. The gravitational waves were detected on September 14, 2015 by the twin Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors, located in Livingston, Louisiana and Hanford, Washington, USA. The breakthrough has been accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters. Gravitational waves carry information about their dramatic origins and about the nature of gravity that cannot otherwise be obtained. The detected waves were produced during the merger of two black holes that occurred more than a billion years ago, creating a single, massive spinning black hole. This collision of two black holes had been predicted but never observed. Based on the observed signals, LIGO scientists estimate that the black holes for this event were about 29 and 36 times the mass of the sun, and the event took place 1.3 billion years ago. By looking at the time of arrival of the signals – the detector in Louisiana recorded the event seven milliseconds before the detector in Washington – scientists can say that the source was located in the Southern Hemisphere. In addition to Pfeiffer, U of T team members include postdoctoral fellow Prayush Kumar and PhD candidate Heather Fong, both at CITA. Former CITA Senior Research Associate Kipp Cannon had led the group since its inception in 2010, before departing just weeks ago for Tokyo University. Cannon spearheaded the development and operation of one of the search strategies that identified the gravitational wave in the detector data. “This detection is beyond our wildest dreams,” Cannon said. “This signal is so loud that we can see clearly the bending of spacetime by colliding black holes imprinted in the waveform. It’s hard to exaggerate how much these few seconds of data have advanced our understanding of nature.” Pfeiffer’s contributions to the LIGO project are informed by his work as the head of the Numerical Relativity group at CITA. The group is among the world’s leaders in simulating collisions of black holes on high-performance supercomputers. Their calculations produced the gravitational waveforms – the shapes of the signals – that LIGO searches for. The results rely in part on the calculations performed on Canadian supercomputers, including U of T’s SciNet. The SciNet systems have been instrumental during the past years for calculations of binary black hole mergers. These calculations enabled scientists to cross-check and verify some of LIGO’s results reported today. “I started graduate school at U of T because I wanted to study gravitational waves, and CITA is currently the only research facility in Canada involved in this exciting field,” said Fong, who, together with Kumar, contributed to and validated the waveforms. https://youtu.be/c-2XIuNFgD0 According to general relativity, a pair of black holes orbiting around each other lose energy through the emission of gravitational waves, causing them to gradually approach each other over billions of years, and then much more quickly in the final minutes. During the final fraction of a second, the two black holes collide into each other at nearly one-half the speed of light and form a single more massive black hole, converting a portion of the combined black holes’ mass to energy, according to Einstein’s formula E=mc2. This energy is emitted as a final strong burst of gravitational waves. It is these gravitational waves that LIGO has observed. “This first observation of gravitational waves by LIGO is as exciting as the first look through telescopes was to the earliest astronomers,” Kumar said. https://youtu.be/Zt8Z_uzG71o Support for the CITA members’ contributions to the research comes from CIFAR, the Canada Research Chairs Program, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Province of Ontario and the University of Toronto.

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

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July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

Toronto, ON– Media are invited to view a live webcast at the University of Toronto (U of T) as the National Science Foundation brings together scientists from Caltech, MIT, and the LIGO Scientific Collaboration this Thursday at 10:30 a.m. (EST) at Washington’s National Press Club for a status report on the effort to detect gravitational waves – or ripples in the fabric of spacetime – using the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). Participants in the LIGO Scientific Collaboration who are based at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics at U of T will be in attendance. Harald Pfeiffer, Canada Research Chair for Numerical Relativity and Gravitational Wave Astrophysics and fellow in the Cosmology and Gravity program at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, will be available to comment on the significance of the update and the University of Toronto’s role in the project. For media unable to attend this live-viewing event, a URL for the live stream will be made available at 9:30 am on Thursday, February 11. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the first publication of Albert Einstein’s prediction of the existence of gravitational waves. With interest in this topic piqued by the centennial, the group will discuss their ongoing efforts to observe and measure cosmic gravitational waves for scientific research. For background about the project, visit: WHEN: Thursday, February 11, 2016 10:30 AM EST WHERE: Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics University of Toronto Room 1318, Burton Tower McLennan Physical Laboratories 60 St. George Street Toronto, ON -30- Media Contacts: Sean Bettam Faculty of Arts & Science University of Toronto s.bettam@utoronto.ca 416-946-7950 (b) 647-228-5820 (c) University of Toronto Communications media.relations@utoronto.ca 416-978-0100 Lindsay Jolivet Canadian Institute for Advanced Research lindsay.jolivet@cifar.ca 416-971-4876  

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

TORONTO , ON - A new University of Toronto study may force scientists to rethink what is behind the mass extinction of amphibians occurring worldwide in the face of climate change, disease and habitat loss. The old cliché “size matters” is in fact the gist of the findings by graduate student Stephen De Lisle and Professor Locke Rowe of U of T’s Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology in a paper published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. By examining research on global patterns of amphibian diversification over hundreds of millions of years, De Lisle and Rowe discovered that “sexually dimorphic” species – those in which males and females differ in size, for example – are at lower risk of extinction and better able to adapt to diverse environments. Their work suggests the ability of males and females in sexually dimorphic amphibian species to independently evolve different traits – such as size – helps them survive extinction threats that kill off others, says De Lisle. He says classic ecological theory would not have predicted that about amphibians, a class of vertebrates that includes frogs, toads, salamanders, newts and caecilians. The conventional school of thought believes different-sized sexes of the same species take up more resources and are less able to adapt and diversify than species where ecologically relevant traits like size are basically the same between males and females. “I think if our results bear on mass extinction at all, it suggests we maybe should start looking more closely at the traits of some of the species that are going extinct,” says De Lisle. “Scientists might start thinking in a new way about how other traits, like sex differences in habitat use or diet, might play a role.” While peacock feathers or deer antlers are understood to help males of those species successfully mate, less is understood about amphibians, which are being wiped out so fast many are going extinct before scientists can identify them. Some estimate between 30 and 40 per cent of the world’s approximately 7,000 species of amphibians are currently in danger of extinction – more than any other animals on earth – and their decline is a critical threat to global biodiversity. Many scientists believe amphibians serve as "canaries in a coal mine," and declines in their populations indicate other groups of animals and plants will soon be at risk. Amphibians are not only an important part of the food chain and biodiversity. Some have chemicals in their skins that can be developed into medicines to fight diseases such as cancer and perhaps even AIDS. Because their skins are highly permeable and they have a two-staged life cycle that starts in water and then moves to land, amphibians may be more susceptible to temperature changes, water and air pollution than other animals. The new study by De Lisle and Rowe adds another piece to the puzzle about why some species are doing well while others are in decline or disappearing. For example, both the golden toad and the harlequin frog of Costa Rica’s Monteverde Cloud Forest Preserve disappeared completely in the late 1980s despite living in what was considered a pristine habitat. “Our work suggests we still maybe don’t have the best understanding of what traits might be influencing these extinctions, although now we have the understanding that sexual dimorphism is an important trait,” says De Lisle.

-30-

MEDIA CONTACTS: Steven De Lisle Ecology & Evolutionary Biology University of Toronto s.delisle@utoronto.ca 804-832-2760 Kim Luke Communications, Arts & Science University of Toronto Kim.luke@utoronto.ca 416-978-4352  

Latest Media Releases

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

June 12, 2017

Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests Rotman study

Toronto, ON – Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore.  Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities. A pair of researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has found the physicality of cleaning one's hands acts to shift goal pursuit, making prior goals less important and subsequent goals more important. The researchers' four experiments each began by bringing participants' attention to particular goals through word games or a short survey, a process called "priming."…

June 5, 2017

Canada’s Top University Kicks off #UofTGrad17, The Country’s Biggest Graduation

Toronto, ON – Starting Tuesday, June 6 the next generation of leaders will graduate from Canada’s top university. This year, U of T will host 27 different ceremonies (two more than in 2016) over 13 days for almost 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students from the university’s three campuses in downtown Toronto, Scarborough and Mississauga. They will be joined by 15 honorary degree recipients who have made notable achievements in their fields. Among them: celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark; media…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Toronto Star | July 24, 2017

How Toronto's chief medical officer became the people’s doctor

Profile of Faculty of Medicine alumna Eileen de Villa, who is Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | July 23, 2017

Observers temper expectations for Sears liquidation deals

David Soberman of the Rotman School of Management analyzes how Sears Canada can make the best of their liquidation. Read more. 

CBC News | July 22, 2017

Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more. 

TORONTO, ON - MaRS Innovation and the University of Toronto (U of T) are pleased to announce that the founders of Granata Decision Systems Inc., a graduate of the University of Toronto Early-Stage Technology (UTEST) start-up incubator program, have joined Google Inc. Dr. Craig Boutilier is a professor in U of T’s Department of Computer Science. He and Tyler Lu, a graduating PhD student in the same department, co-founded Granata Decision Systems in 2012 to develop their advanced decision-support technologies. Granata’s software platform provided real-time optimization and scenario analysis capabilities for large-scale, data-driven marketing problems and group/organizational decision-making. The company was part of the UTEST program’s first cohort. “This is a significant milestone for the UTEST program and the wider MaRS Innovation portfolio,” said Dr. Raphael Hofstein, president and CEO. “We co-created the UTEST program with U of T to foster entrepreneurship in a meaningful way while encouraging students and professors to translate their academic ideas into commercial realities. We hope Craig and Tyler’s success will motivate other researchers and students to consider working with MI and participate in UTEST and our other commercialization programs.” UTEST is part of U of T’s growing ecosystem of incubators and commercialization support services, and was named one of Canada’s top seven accelerators in 2013. Jointly administered by MaRS Innovation and U of T, the program’s mission is to support early-stage start-ups in computer science. Through UTEST, aspiring entrepreneurs launch a company, develop a business strategy, meet with industry representatives to get feedback on their products, secure seed funding and opportunities for follow-on investment, receive mentorship and have use of office space in the MaRS Discovery District for a year. Unlike other start-up incubators, UTEST accepts companies in the very earliest stages of idea generation— before they’re ready for traditional incubators — and can be a springboard to other North American accelerator ecosystems, such as YCombinator, Creative Destruction and One Eleven. “Craig and Tyler’s success is an excellent example of what can be achieved when innovative ideas are transformed into reality by the kind of support UTEST provides during critical early stages of development,” said Dr. Peter Lewis, interim vice-president of Research ad U of T. “We’re thrilled to see them take their next steps with Google.”

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For more information, please contact: Kurtis Scissons Co-Director, UTEST 416-978-3557 kurtis.scissons@utoronto.ca

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Canadian researchers develop technology for self-driving wheelchairs

The Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Jonathan Kelly describes a program to develop affordable self-driving wheelchairs. Read more.