Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized arthropod – a ubiquitous group of invertebrate animals with segmented limbs and hardened exoskeletons. Tokummia documents for the first time in detail the anatomy of early “mandibulates”, a hyperdiverse sub-group of arthropods which possess a pair of specialized appendages known as mandibles, used to grasp, crush and cut their food. Mandibulates include millions of species and represent one of the greatest evolutionary and ecological success stories of life on Earth. “In spite of their colossal diversity today, the origin of mandibulates had largely remained a mystery,” said Cédric Aria, lead author of the study and recent graduate of the PhD program in the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology at U of T, now working as a post-doctoral researcher at the Nanjing Institute for Geology and Palaeontology, in China. “Before now we’ve had only sparse hints at what the first arthropods with mandibles could have looked like, and no idea of what could have been the other key characteristics that triggered the unrivalled diversification of that group.” Tokummia lived in a tropical sea teeming with life and was among the largest Cambrian predators, exceeding 10 cm in length fully extended. An occasional swimmer, the researchers conclude its robust anterior legs made it a preferred bottom-dweller, as lobsters or mantis shrimps today. Specimens come from 508 million-year-old sedimentary rocks near Marble Canyon in Kootenay national park, British Columbia. Most specimens at the basis of this study were collected during extensive ROM-led fieldwork activities in 2014. “This spectacular new predator, one of the largest and best preserved soft-bodied arthropods from Marble Canyon, joins the ranks of many unusual marine creatures that lived during the Cambrian Explosion, a period of rapid evolutionary change starting about half a billion years ago when most major animal groups first emerged in the fossil record,” said co-author Jean-Bernard Caron, senior curator of invertebrate paleontology at the ROM and an associate professor in the Departments of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and Earth Sciences at U of T. Analysis of several fossil specimens, following careful mechanical preparation and photographic work at the ROM, showed that Tokummia sported broad serrated mandibles as well as large but specialized anterior claws, called maxillipeds, which are typical features of modern mandibulates. “The pincers of Tokummia are large, yet also delicate and complex, reminding us of the shape of a can opener, with their couple of terminal teeth on one claw, and the other claw being curved towards them,” said Aria. “But we think they might have been too fragile to be handling shelly animals, and might have been better adapted to the capture of sizable soft prey items, perhaps hiding away in mud. Once torn apart by the spiny limb bases under the trunk, the mandibles would have served as a revolutionary tool to cut the flesh into small, easily digestible pieces.” The body of Tokummia is made of more than 50 small segments covered by a broad two-piece shell-like structure called a bivalved carapace. Importantly, the animal bears subdivided limb bases with tiny projections called endites, which can be found in the larvae of certain crustaceans and are now thought to have been critical innovations for the evolution of the various legs of mandibulates, and even for the mandibles themselves. The many-segmented body is otherwise reminiscent of myriapods, a group that includes centipedes, millipedes, and their relatives. “Tokummia also lacks the typical second antenna found in crustaceans, which illustrates a very surprising convergence with such terrestrial mandibulates,” said Aria. The study also resolves the affinities of other emblematic fossils from Canada’s Burgess Shale more than a hundred years after their discovery. “Our study suggests that a number of other Burgess Shale fossils such as Branchiocaris, Canadaspis and Odaraia form with Tokummia a group of crustacean-like arthropods that we can now place at the base of all mandibulates,” said Aria. The animal was named after Tokumm Creek, which flows through Marble Canyon in northern Kootenay National Park, and the Greek for “seizing”. The Marble Canyon fossil deposit was first discovered in 2012 during prospection work led by the Royal Ontario Museum and is part of the Burgess Shale fossil deposit, which extends to the north into Yoho National Park in the Canadian Rockies. All specimens are held in the collections of the Royal Ontario Museum on behalf of Parks Canada. The Burgess Shale fossil sites are located within Yoho and Kootenay national parks in British Columbia. The Burgess Shale was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1980. Parks Canada is proud to protect these globally significant palaeontological sites, and to work with leading scientific researchers to expand knowledge and understanding of this key period of earth history. New information from ongoing scientific research is continually incorporated into Parks Canada's Burgess Shale education and interpretation programs, which include guided hikes to these outstanding fossil sites. The findings are described in the paper “'Burgess Shale fossils illustrate the origin of the mandibulate body plan”. Funding for the research was provided primarily by a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Discovery Grant (#341944) to Caron, and Royal Ontario Museum fieldwork grants. – 30 – Notes to media: 1) The paper will appear online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature22080 after the embargo lifts. MEDIA CONTACTS: Cédric Aria (bilingual – English-French) Post-doctoral researcher Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology cedric.aria@protonmail.com +86 153 7100 2536 (mobile) (GMT +8) Skype ID: c.aria Alternate contact: Fangchen Zhao  +86 137 7053 0436 (mobile), +86 25 8328 2176 (desk) (GMT +8) Jean-Bernard Caron (bilingual – English-French) Senior Curator of Invertebrate Palaeontology, Royal Ontario Museum and Associate Professor, Departments of Earth Sciences and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology University of Toronto jcaron@rom.on.ca (preferred mode of communication) 416 586 5593 (desk) Sean BettamCommunications, Faculty of Arts & Science University of Toronto 416 946 7950 (desk) s.bettam@utoronto.ca David McKay Communications Coordinator Royal Ontario Museum 416 586 5559 (desk) davidm@rom.on.ca Tania Peters Public Relations and Communications Officer Parks Canada +1 250 343 2005 Tania.Peters@pc.gc.ca

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

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U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In Canada there is already C$9 billion in impact investment, with increasing demand from millennial investors who are more than twice as likely as baby boomers to show interest (Responsible Investment Association 2016), Despite this rapid growth, many investors and their advisors have a tough time finding products. “We believe the future of investing will be shaped by a generation that seeks to align their values with everything they do. The old model would have said – keep this information proprietary  – but now more than ever we must lead by example if we expect to engage investors and markets in resolving our most pressing social and environmental challenges,” says Norm Tasevski, co-founder of Purpose Capital. “A common challenge to those interested in impact investing is finding products. To help them, to help the market grow, and to better understand this market as it evolves, we worked with Purpose Capital to create OPEN IMPACT,” adds Rod Lohin, Executive Director of the Michael Lee-Chin Institute for Corporate Citizenship at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management. OPEN IMPACT is a free public resource that includes a searchable inventory of Canadian impact investing products or funds. It launches with information on more than 150 products across all asset classes (equity, debt, fixed income and more), including 50+ crowd-sourced profiles with additional detail. These products aim to achieve a financial return as well as create tangible social or environmental benefits, such as improving access to education, affordable housing, or biodiversity conservation. Most of the 50+ funds profiled in greater detail were launched in the last 10 years, but a pioneering fund at Desjardins launched in 1971. Fifteen now have more than C$50 million each in assets under management, including Renewal Partner’s Renewal3 Limited Partnership. Eight funds report financial return targets in excess of 12%, such as Greensoil Building Innovation Fund. Five, such as the Access Community Capital Fund, can be accessed by individual investors for as little as $250.  More details about other funds will be added over time. OPEN IMPACT is a public good research partnership between Purpose Capital Inc. (a Canadian impact investment advisory firm), and the Michael Lee-Chin Family Institute for Corporate Citizenship at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto (a research centre focusing on the role of business in society). Purpose Capital is an impact investment advisory firm that mobilizes all forms of capital – financial, physical, human and social — to accelerate social progress. More about Purpose Capital can be found at http://purposecap.com/. The Rotman School’s Michael Lee-Chin Institute for Corporate Citizenship helps business leaders integrate sustainability into strategy and practices by developing and disseminating research, tools and curricula. To find out more, visit http://www.rotman.utoronto.ca/FacultyAndResearch/ResearchCentres/LeeChinInstitute. The Rotman School of Management is located in the heart of Canada’s commercial and cultural capital and is part of the University of Toronto, one of the world’s top 20 research universities. The Rotman School fosters a new way to think that enables our graduates to tackle today’s global business and societal challenges.  For more information, visit www.rotman.utoronto.ca. -30- Ken McGuffin Manager, Media Relations Rotman School of Management University of Toronto Tel: 416-946-3818 E-mail: mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and Trust in Fraud Victimization in Older Adults’, recently published in the journal, Frontiers in Psychology, revealed that cognitive differences were the most important differentiator between victims and non-victims. Demographics such as gender, income, education and interpersonal trust did not prove to be factors. Read the full story: http://uoft.me/Older-Victims-Fraud-OISE Dispels common belief “The results of this study were very surprising – they dispel a common belief about why some older people fall victim to fraud,” said Dr. Lee, professor at OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Study and Tier 1 Canada Research Chair. “People often think things like loneliness or trusting behaviours are the culprit,” said Judges. “But this study shows that cognitive factors – not social factors – are the biggest difference between older adult victims and non-victims.” This pattern, she said, was found in study participants in Ontario aged 60 and older who had not been diagnosed with a cognitive impairment. They each lived independently in their communities. Researchers explained that cognitive abilities are the skills required to think, learn and reason. These skills can include being able to perform simple calculations in one’s head, follow a conversation from start to finish, and remember events that took place over the past month. “The same abilities that enable someone to do these tasks well may also be important for identifying and avoiding scams,” Dr. Lee explained. Support needed to prevent decline of cognitive skills “The results can play an important role in the prevention of fraud victimization in older people,” said Ryerson University’s Dr. Lixia Yang, who collaborated on the study along with PhD student Sara Gallant. Judges agrees. “For example, identifying the most important skills needed in financial decision-making and then working to prevent cognitive decline in those key areas could make an impact,” she said, also suggesting additional support be provided to those experiencing cognitive decline. Adults 60-69 most victimized in mass-marketing scams The study asked participants about 15 common types of consumer fraud and mass marketing fraud including weight loss scams, advance free loans, lottery fraud, and emergency (or grandparent) scams. Despite efforts to prevent fraud victimization, people in Western nations are collectively losing billions of dollars according to consumer groups like the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre, and others. In 2014, Canadians lost a reported $74 million to mass-marketing scams alone, and 60-69 year olds were the most frequently targeted group, according to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre. In the same year, Americans lost $1.7 billion to various scams, according to the Federal Trade Commission, while the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission reported losses of $82 million due to fraud. -30- MEDIA CONTACTS Rebecca Judges (co-author of study and primary media contact) PhD student, OISE at the University of Toronto Email: rebecca.judges@mail.utoronto.ca Phone: 416-934-4503 Dr. Kang Lee (co-author of study) Professor, Dr. Eric Jackman Institute for Child Study, OISE at the University of Toronto Email: kang.lee@utoronto.ca Lindsey Craig Communications and Media Relations Coordinator, OISE at the University of Toronto Email: lindsey.craig@utoronto.ca Phone: 416-978-1127 Lauren Clegg Public Affairs, Ryerson University Email: lauren.clegg@ryerson.ca Phone: 416-979-5000 x 7161      

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese rights lawyers, law firm staff, activists and their relatives. The researchers tested words from news articles from popular news websites and discovered 44 keywords related to the 709 Crackdown were blocked on WeChat. These keywords were also found filtered on the search function of Weibo. The majority of these keywords include references to the names of individuals targeted by the crackdown. “WeChat blocks certain combinations of keywords related to sensitive topics such as the ‘709 Crackdown.’  When a message contains the words of a blacklisted keyword combination, it is silently filtered.  Neither the sender nor the intended recipient receive a notification that the message was censored.” – Jeffrey Knockel, Senior Researcher, Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto With 806 million monthly active users, WeChat is the dominant chat application in China and fourth largest in the world. Weibo, China’s Twitter-like service, has reached 313 million monthly active users, almost equal to that of Twitter. Both applications thrive on their huge user base in China and concerned citizens have taken to these popular platforms to advocate for individuals affected by the crackdown. But both platforms must also follow strict content regulations in China. On WeChat, censorship related to the 709 Crackdown is enabled specifically on users with accounts registered to mainland China phone numbers, a consistent pattern Citizen Lab has found in past research. “These findings highlight the challenges and potential hindrances faced by individuals, NGOs, and the international community in conducting advocacy work related to the ‘709 Crackdown’ as well as many other politically-sensitive cases in China. While there is tremendous global effort to help Chinese rights defenders, many of these messages fail to reach domestic audiences in China due to information control practices on Chinese social media platforms.” – Lotus Ruan, Research Fellow, Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto In addition to keyword filtering, the researchers found evidence of image filtering related to the 709 Crackdown on WeChat, the first documentation of its kind on the app. The researchers documented image filtering on WeChat Moments, a WeChat feature that resembles Facebook’s Timeline where users can share text or image updates with their friends. The greater attention to Moments is possibly due to concerns about posts being spread to larger audiences and leading to mobilization. Similar to keyword filtering, censorship of images is only enabled for China accounts. The filtering is also not transparent. “Our report serves as a reminder that for a large portion of the world, social media act as gatekeepers of what they can read, speak, and see. When they operate in a repressive environment like China, social media can end up surreptitiously preventing important political topics from being discussed.  Our finding that WeChat is also systematically censoring images as well as text opens up the daunting prospect of multi-media censorship and surveillance on social media.” – Ron Deibert, Director, the Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto The Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, has extensive experience uncovering Internet censorship practices through network measurement and reverse engineering techniques. Previous work has investigated censorship on WeChat Public Accounts, Sina Weibo, chat apps, video sharing sites and live streaming platforms used in China. -30- For media inquiries, contact: Dena Allen Public Affairs & Engagement Munk School of Global Affairs University of Toronto Telephone: 416-946-0123 Mobile: 416-795-3902 dena.allen@utoronto.ca Guide on Citing in Media Title: We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussions Blocked on Weibo and WeChat Published By: The Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto Publication Date: April 13, 2017 Report URL: https://citizenlab.org/2017/04/we-cant-chat-709-crackdown-discussions-blocked-on-weibo-and-wechat/  

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings, and more. The event is the finale of Praxis, a unique course from U of T’s Engineering Science program. The course challenges students to collaborate with communities, agencies and companies across the GTA to find new ways of improving the city, including:
1. Designing an adaptive seat for disabled sailing Challenge: A day on the lake brings all sailors feelings of independence, joy and freedom. But for those with physical disabilities, sailboats can be tricky to manoeuver, unpredictable and dangerous. Students teamed up with the Disabled Sailing Association of Ontario to create a comfortable, portable, affordable and safe sailboat seat for both sailors and volunteers.
2. Targeting lost arrows at Seaton Park Challenge: Archers at Seaton Park’s outdoor archery range want to keep the time spent hunting for their arrows to a minimum — it can be time-consuming, frustrating and dangerous. Students worked with the City of Toronto to propose a variety of cheap and visible solutions that reconsider every element of design, from the arrows to the lawn of the archery range.
3. Keeping a local family business rolling Challenge: G&S Dye is a family-run fabric and dye business in downtown Toronto. With only one employee, inventory, shelf stocking and customer service are time-consuming processes that directly affect the company’s bottom line. Students devised a suite of solutions for improving storage, rolling and cutting, and transporting heavy fabric at G&S.
Plus student solutions for these organizations:
  • Improving accessibility and user experience at a gallery showcasing works by disabled artists — Tangled Art Gallery
  • Stimulating residents with dementia — St. George Care Community
  • Redesigning wheelchairs to reduce pressure sores — Kensington Gardens Residential Home
  • Diagnosing a rare form of epilepsy in infants — Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto
  • Enhancing independence in the kitchen for students with physical and cognitive conditions — Kohai Educational Centre
At the Praxis showcase, students unveil their proposed designs and receive immediate feedback from their clients, community representatives, and professional engineers, as well as members of the general public. All are welcome. Details: What: U of T Engineering – Praxis II Showcase Date:  Wednesday, April 12, 2017 Location: Great Hall, Hart House (7 Hart House Circle) Public Showcase: 9:30 am – 4:00 pm Media Showcase: 11:30 am – 1:30 pm (Media welcome to attend throughout the event) -30- Media contact: Marit Mitchell, University of Toronto Engineering marit.mitchell@utoronto.ca; 647-228-4358 (cell)  

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping our culture, workplace practices, and society at large. On the other end of the spectrum, there is the service and working classes—which make up the other two-thirds of the workplace, have 65 and 30 million people respectively, and are consistently paid lower salaries for doing all the jobs that we need to keep our cities and our lives running smoothly. How did this happen in a country that has historically touted itself as the land of opportunity for all? How do we fix it before it’s too late? Prof. Richard Florida of the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management answers those questions in his new book THE NEW URBAN CRISIS: How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle-Class—And What We Can Do About It (Basic Books; April 11, 2017). A leading urbanist and intellectual, Prof. Florida was one of the first scholars to anticipate the back-to-the-city movement in his groundbreaking The Rise of the Creative Class. This movement saw the young, educated, and affluent surging back into cities, reversing decades of suburban flight and urban decline. Yet, it soon became clear that all was not well in our cities; instead there was a dark side to the creative class economy which Florida had previously celebrated. The same forces that have powered urban growth also have generated cities’ vexing challenges, such as gentrification, segregation, inequality, and unaffordable housing. “I began to see the back-to-the-city movement as something that conferred a disproportionate share of its benefits on a small group of places and people,” Prof. Florida states. “Virtually all our cities suffer from growing economic divides. Tens of millions of Americans remain locked in persistent poverty. Across the great majority of cities and suburbs alike, the middle class is declining. Our economic landscape is splintering into small areas of affluence and concentrated advantage, and much larger areas of poverty and concentrated disadvantage.” As THE NEW URBAN CRISIS reveals, there is a winner-take-all urbanism in our country. This means that the prodigious growth of our largest cities and the intense competition for their most desirable neighborhoods has created vast disparities within their boundaries. These disparities have not only led to the decline of middle-class neighborhoods, but also have resulted in a growing gulf between a few “superstar” cities and the rest. “The greatest driver of innovation, economic growth, and urban prosperity—the clustering of talent and other economic assets in cities conferred the lion’s share of its benefits on the already privileged, leaving 66 percent of the population behind,” Florida explains. But if this crisis is urban, so is its solution. With THE NEW URBAN CRISIS, Florida offers a compelling diagnosis of our economic ills and a bold prescription for more inclusive cities capable of ensuring growth and prosperity for all. Cities remain the most powerful economic engines the world has ever seen. The only way forward is to devise a new model of urbanism-for-all that encourages innovation and wealth creation while generating good jobs, rising living standards, and a better way of life for everyone. We must rebuild cities and suburbs for the middle class by investing in infrastructure, reforming zoning and tax laws, building more affordable housing, and further empowering cities to address their own particular challenges. “The stakes could not be higher,” Prof. Florida warns us. “More than a crisis of cities, [this is] a crisis of our economy, society, and entire way of life.” ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Richard Florida is a University Professor and the Director of Cities at the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management. He is a senior editor at the Atlantic, cofounder and editor-at-large for the Atlantic’s CityLab, and founder of the Creative Class Group. He tweets at @Richard_Florida ABOUT THE BOOK: THE NEW URBAN CRISIS: How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Class—and What We Can Do About It By Richard Florida Published by Basic Books • Publication date: April 11 2017 ISBN: 978-0-465-07974-2 • E-book ISBN: 978-0-465-09778-4 • $28.00 / $36.50 CAN •  Hardcover The Rotman School of Management is located in the heart of Canada’s commercial and cultural capital and is part of the University of Toronto, one of the world’s top 20 research universities. The Rotman School fosters a new way to think that enables our graduates to tackle today’s global business and societal challenges.  For more information, visit www.rotman.utoronto.ca. -30- For more information: Ken McGuffin Manager, Media Relations Rotman School of Management University of Toronto Tel: 416-946-3818 E-mail: mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental Science, results showed that after six months of age, infants begin to associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music. In the second study, "Infants rely more on gaze cues from own-race than other-race adults for learning under uncertainty", published in Child Development, researchers found that six-to eight-month-old infants were more inclined to learn information from an adult of his or her own race than from an adult of a different race. (In both studies, infants less than six months of age were not found to show such biases). Racial bias begins at younger age, without experience with other-race individuals  "The findings of these studies are significant for many reasons," said Dr. Kang Lee, professor at OISE's Jackman Institute of Child Study, a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair and lead author of the studies. "The results show that race-based bias already exists around the second half of a child's first year.  This challenges the popular view that race-based bias first emerges only during the preschool years." Hear Dr. Lee discuss the research results. Researchers say these findings are also important because they offer a new perspective on the cause of race-based bias. "When we consider why someone has a racial bias, we often think of negative experience he or she may have had with other-race individuals.  But, these findings suggest that a race-based bias emerges without experience with other-race individuals," said Dr. Naiqi (Gabriel) Xiao, first author of the two papers and postdoctoral fellow at Princeton University. This can be inferred because prior studies from other labs have indicated that many infants typically experience over 90 per cent own-race faces. Following this pattern, the current studies involved babies who had little to no prior experience with other-race individuals. "These findings thus point to the possibility that aspects of racial bias later in life may arise from our lack of exposure to other-race individuals in infancy," Dr. Lee said. Study results could be significant in prevention of racial bias He continued to explain that overall, the results of these studies are critically important given the issues of wide-spread racial bias and racism around the world. "If we can pinpoint the starting point of racial bias, which we may have done here, we can start to find ways to prevent racial biases from happening," he said. "An important finding is that infants will learn from people they are most exposed to," added Dr. Xiao, indicating that parents can help prevent racial bias by, for example, introducing their children to people from a variety of races. First study: Face-race and music In the first study, infants from 3 to 10 months of age watched a sequence of videos depicting female adults with a neutral facial expression. Before viewing each face, infants heard a music clip. Babies participated in one of the four music-face combinations: happy music followed by own-race faces, sad music followed by own-race faces, happy music followed by other-race faces, and sad music followed by other-race faces. The study found that infants at six to nine months of age looked longer at own-race faces when paired with happy music as opposed to with sad music. By contrast, six- to nine-month-olds looked longer at other-race faces when paired with sad music compared to with happy music. Second study: Face-race and learning The second study examined whether infants were biased to learn from own-race adults versus other-race adults. Six to eight-month-old infants saw a series of videos. In each video, a female adult looked at any one of the four corners of the screen. Following the look, in some videos, an animal image appeared in the looked-at location (a reliable gaze). In other videos, an animal image appeared at a non-looked-at location (an unreliable gaze). The results showed that six to eight-month-old infants followed the gaze of members of their own race more than they followed the gaze of other-race individuals. This occurred when the faces were slightly unreliable, as they are in the natural environment. This result suggests that, under uncertainty, infants are biased to learn information from own-race adults as opposed to other-race adults. Racial bias can ‘permeate almost all of our social interactions’ Dr. Lee said it’s important to be mindful of the impact that racial bias has on our everyday lives, stressing that not only is explicit bias a concern, but so too are implicit forms. “Implicit racial biases tend to be subconscious, pernicious, and insidious. It permeates almost all of our social interactions, from health care to commerce, employment, politics, and dating. Because of that, it’s very important to study where these kinds of biases come from and use that information to try and prevent racial biases from developing,” he said. MEDIA CONTACTS: Dr. Kang Lee Professor, Dr. Eric Jackman Institute for Child Study, OISE/University of Toronto Email: kang.lee@utoronto.ca   (Email best way to reach Dr. Lee to set up interview) Naiqi (Gabriel) Xiao Postdoctoral Researcher, Princeton University Email: naiqi.xiao@princeton.edu Phone: +1-609-608-6248 Media Relations Coordinator Lindsey Craig Communications & Media Relations Coordinator, OISE/University of Toronto Email: lindsey.craig@utoronto.ca Phone: 416-978-1127

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – Augmented reality startup ModiFace will make a major announcement Tuesday, aimed to accelerate development of augmented reality (AR) and artificial intelligence (AI) talent at Canada’s top-ranked engineering school. The company, founded by Professor Parham Aarabi of The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, uses AR and AI to build advanced facial visualization software for the beauty and medical industries. ModiFace technology powers over 100 AR applications by Fortune 500 brands including Sephora, L’Oreal, Allergan, Vichy and Clairol, among others. “The future of ModiFace is highly dependent on our access to the best AR engineers in the world,” says Aarabi. “For AR, it takes about a year for a new graduate to get up to speed with the latest concepts in artificial intelligence, systems engineering, and computer vision. As a result, we want to invest in students early, while they’re still in school, to start giving them the best training in these fast-moving fields.” Aarabi will be joined by The Honourable Reza Moridi, Ontario Minister of Research, Innovation and Science, and Cristina Amon, Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering. Journalists will have an opportunity to speak with Aarabi following the announcement. Event details ModiFace announces major investment in AR, AI at U of T Timing: Tuesday, April 11, 2017, Announcement at 9:20 am; Q&A at 9:40 am Location: Hart House, 7 Hart House Circle, University of Toronto East Common Room [Map] Media contact: Marit Mitchell U of T Engineering 416-978-4498 (desk), 647-228-4358 (cell) marit.mitchell@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

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U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – The Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies at the University of Toronto has announced the recipients of their 2017 awards, which will be presented at a gala ceremony at Hart House in Toronto on April 26. “This year’s Bonham Centre Awards recipients have been chosen to highlight the history and leading contributions of Indigenous people in recognizing sexual and gender diversity. As Canada prepares to celebrate 150 years since confederation we thought it crucial to focus on Indigenous communities that predate European settlement,” said Brenda Cossman, Director of the Bonham Centre at University College and a Professor in the Faculty of Law. “We are honoured this year to recognize Lee Maracle, Kent Monkman, Candy Palmater, and Teddy Syrette, who have fought to include Indigenous worldviews in conversations of gender and sexuality.” Lee Maracle is an award-winning author and teacher of the Sto:Loh nation who has been an important ally for two spirited people at the University of Toronto and well beyond. Kent Monkman is a leading Canadian artist of Cree ancestry who works with a variety of media, including painting, film/video, performance, and installation. His recent exhibition, “Shame and Prejudice: A Story of Resilience,” has drawn rave reviews and brought attention to Indigenous perspectives on colonial Canadian history. Candy Palmater is a queer Mi’kmaw activist, actor, writer, international speaker, and award-winning TV and radio personality. Teddy Syrette, an outspoken Indigenous, Queer, First Nation person of Batchewana First Nation of the Ojibway peoples whose work includes advocacy, community building, and the arts. The Bonham Centre is proud to partner with RBC as the Presenting Sponsor for the 2017 Bonham Centre Awards Gala. The Bonham Centre Awards are given annually in recognition of significant contribution to the public understanding of sexual diversity. More information about the Awards and the gala is available at http://www.uc.utoronto.ca/bcag2017. The Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies offers an undergraduate program, a collaborative graduate program, hosts academic and community events, and promotes research into sexuality. It is a hub for forging connections among faculty, undergraduates, graduate students, and community members interested in questions about how we understand sexual diversity and sexual practices. - 30 - Media Contact: Alex Wells Program Assistant 416-978-6276 Alex.Wells@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – A finance professor at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management received the Governor’s Award from the Bank of Canada. Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an assistant professor of finance, will receive the award for 2017. The award recognizes outstanding academics at a relatively early stage in their careers, who are working at Canadian universities in areas of research important to the Bank’s core functions. The award provides annual funding of $25,000 for a term of up to two years. Last year it was presented to Liyan Yang, an associate professor of finance, at the Rotman School. In his research, Prof. Simutin primarily focuses on studying institutional money management and understanding risks that affect asset prices. His current work extends to the area of corporate finance, where he is studying gender pay gap in a corporate setting. Specifically, he is using a novel data to understand the impact of CEO's exposure to gender imbalance in his/her formative years. Prof. Simutin's research has been published in leading finance journals, including the Journal of Finance, the Review of Financial Studies, and the Journal of Financial Economics. He has been the recipient of several grants and awards. His recent research was honoured with a 2016 Best Paper Award by the Review of Asset Pricing Studies. Earlier in the week, he was named one of the 40 Most Outstanding Business School Professors Under 40 by the business school news site Poets&Quants. Each of the last three years, Prof. Simutin was voted MBA Core Instructor of the Year by the Rotman School’s graduating class. His research has been presented at numerous academic conferences, and he has been frequently invited to speak to private sector financial firms. Prof. Simutin holds a PhD in finance from the University of British Columbia’s Sauder School of Business. He graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of Washington in 2004, with a BA in business administration and a concentration in finance and accounting. The Rotman School of Management is located in the heart of Canada’s commercial and cultural capital and is part of the University of Toronto, one of the world’s top 20 research universities. The Rotman School fosters a new way to think that enables our graduates to tackle today’s global business and societal challenges.  For more information, visit www.rotman.utoronto.ca. -30- Ken McGuffin Manager, Media Relations Rotman School of Management University of Toronto Tel: 416-946-3818 E-mail: mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – At the Japan-Canada Summit Meeting in May 2016, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe noted that Japan wished to support Japanese studies at Canadian universities in order to promote mutual understanding between the two countries. Today, based upon this commitment, the Government of Japan is conferring US$5 million on the University of Toronto to establish an endowed chair in Japanese politics and global affairs, and to launch a Centre for the Study of Global Japan. The University of Toronto is the first Canadian university to receive such support from the Government of Japan. The Consul General of Japan in Toronto, Mr. Yasunori Nakayama, says, “At a time when we are experiencing significant changes and instability on the global stage, Japan and Canada, as members of G7 countries that share common values, have a responsibility to make contributions to the world community that ensure peace and prosperity. We also share common challenges such as terrorism, global warming and our aging populations. It is therefore imperative that our academic institutions are able to conduct extensive research that enables us to properly understand each other. The University of Toronto is one of the oldest, biggest and most influential universities in Canada. I am delighted that an institution as prestigious as the University of Toronto now has the means to significantly broaden its study of contemporary Japan with a global perspective.” “The University of Toronto has a keen, long-standing interest in Japan, because of its importance on the world stage and the strong political, economic and cultural ties between our two countries,” says U of T President Meric Gertler. “We are deeply honoured, therefore, to have been selected by the Government of Japan for this landmark endowment, which will extend and amplify our impact in the study of Japan as a major global power.” The University of Toronto is home to Canada’s first Department of East Asian Studies and has substantial expertise in the field. The gift will enable the University to recruit a top expert in the politics, diplomacy, security and global affairs of Japan. The chairholder will be cross-appointed to the Department of Political Science and the Munk School of Global Affairs at the Faculty of Arts & Science. In the interim, Professor David Welch will be appointed the inaugural visiting chair. Welch, a professor of political science at the University of Waterloo, holds the Centre for International Governance Innovation Chair of Global Security at the Balsillie School of International Affairs. Professor Louis Pauly, chair of the Department of Political Science, says, “The endowed chair will secure the permanent presence here of a scholar who studies the political dimensions of Japan’s vital contributions to regional and global order.” The chair will also lead the Centre for the Study of Global Japan. The Centre, which will be housed at the Munk School of Global Affairs, will expand teaching, research and public outreach by bringing together scholars of Japan from across the university and beyond, as well as practitioners and others interested in the country and the region. It will organize a permanent lecture and seminar series, anchored by an annual lecture by an eminent analyst of Japanese politics and diplomacy. “The Centre will open up more bilateral opportunities to build strong relationships and lifelong interests in Japanese politics and global affairs,” says Professor Stephen Toope, director of the Munk School of Global Affairs. “This partnership will ensure that the University is able to promote and disseminate knowledge of contemporary Japan to the next generation of leaders, especially important during this time of dramatic change.” - 30 - MEDIA CONTACTS Professor Louis Pauly Chair, Department of Political Science University of Toronto louis.pauly@utoronto.ca 416-978-6385 Professor Stephen Toope Director, Munk School of Global Affairs University of Toronto stephen.toope@utoronto.ca 416-946-8450 Diana Kuprel Director, Advancement Communications Faculty of Arts & Science d.kuprel@utoronto.ca 416-946-3118 Rui Umezawa Chief Advisor to the Consul General Consulate General of Japan rui.umezawa@to.mofa.go.jp 416-306-1850

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – More than 150 students with expertise in design thinking from across the United States, Europe and Canada will be competing in the annual Rotman Design Challenge at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management on April 1 and 2. This year’s challenge is to support TELUS, the lead sponsor, in its Future of Work culture evolution. The challenge is being tackled by 28 teams of problem solvers, thinkers and innovators in masters-level business and design programs, who will present their ideas on how relationships between employers and employees might change in the future. Teams have been given four weeks to problem solve, test and iterate their ideas using the Rotman School’s three gears of Business Design: Empathy & Need Finding, Prototyping and Experimentation and Business Strategy. Student teams will present their findings at the Rotman School to a set of judges, and an audience of industry experts and academics. A winner will be announced at the end of the Challenge on April 2 and will be awarded the grand prize of CAD 9,000 (CAD 5000 for the 2nd place and CAD 3,000 for 3rd). Teams will also have the opportunity to network and participate in workshops led by TELUS as well as consulting firms, SYPartners and Doblin. This year’s participants come from some of the top  business and design schools in the world including: Cambridge Judge Business School, Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, DeGroote School of Business at McMaster University, Gustavson School of Business at University of Victoria, IIT Institute of Design at the Illinois Institute of Technology, Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, Savannah College of Art and Design, The College of William & Mary, Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College and the University of Virginia Darden School of Business. To find out more about the Rotman Design Challenge, please visit: www.rotmandesignchallenge.com and follow us Facebook. www.facebook.com/RotmanDesignChallenge The Rotman School of Management is located in the heart of Canada’s commercial and cultural capital and is part of the University of Toronto, one of the world’s top 20 research universities. The Rotman School fosters a new way to think that enables our graduates to tackle today’s global business and societal challenges.  For more information, visit www.rotman.utoronto.ca. -30- Amy Fong Coordinator, Media Relations and Events Rotman School of Management University of Toronto Tel: 416-978-4193 E-mail: amy.fong@rotman.utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

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Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

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U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – A finance professor who excels in the classroom as well as in his research on financial economics at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has been named as one of the Most Outstanding Top 40 Under 40 B-School Professors in the annual feature published by the business education site Poets&Quants. Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an assistant professor of finance, teaches a first-year finance course in the Rotman Full Time MBA program, while also conducting world-class research. “The MBA course is widely regarded as a difficult and challenging course by students but also a highly valuable learning experience – for both students interested in pursuing a career in finance and those who want to do something else,” says Prof. Craig Doidge, “Comments by students consistently highlight the learning experience, the practical value of the course, and Prof. Simutin’s excellent instruction and dedication to teaching.” “Prof. Simutin’s teaching style allowed me to quickly grasp even the most complicated concepts and build further interest in learning more about this field. His passion for finance and teaching was evident throughout the course, and he always ensured that all questions were welcomed and students felt inspired,” says Dina Nikitina, MBA’17. In his research, Prof. Simutin primarily focuses on studying institutional money management and understanding risks that affect asset prices. His current work extends to the area of corporate finance, where he is studying gender pay gap in a corporate setting. Specifically, he is using a novel data to understand the impact of CEO's exposure to gender imbalance in his/her formative years. Prof. Simutin's research has been published in leading finance journals, including the Journal of Finance, the Review of Financial Studies, and the Journal of Financial Economics. He has been the recipient of several grants and awards. His recent research was honoured with a 2016 Best Paper Award by the Review of Asset Pricing Studies. Each of the last three years, Prof. Simutin was voted MBA Core Instructor of the Year by the Rotman School’s graduating class. His research has been presented at numerous academic conferences, and he has been frequently invited to speak to private sector financial firms. Prof. Simutin holds a PhD in finance from the University of British Columbia’s Sauder School of Business. He graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of Washington in 2004, with a BA in business administration and a concentration in finance and accounting. The Rotman School of Management is located in the heart of Canada’s commercial and cultural capital and is part of the University of Toronto, one of the world’s top 20 research universities. The Rotman School fosters a new way to think that enables our graduates to tackle today’s global business and societal challenges.  For more information, visit www.rotman.utoronto.ca. -30- Amy Fong Coordinator, Media Relations and Events Rotman School of Management University of Toronto Tel: 416-978-4193 E-mail: amy.fong@rotman.utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – An innovative collaboration between government, industry, and academia aims to accelerate the development of cancer treatments in Canada. The National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and the Toronto-based Centre for the Commercialization of Antibodies and Biologics (CCAB) have put in place over $1M in collaborative agreements over the past year to produce and test therapeutic antibodies discovered at the University of Toronto (U of T). Cancer treatment is evolving rapidly toward more effective molecules, including single-domain and bi-specific antibodies, antibody-drug conjugates, and immunotherapy. These medicines, also called biologics, are able to specifically target cancer cells and in some cases, recruit the body’s immune system to help destroy them. CCAB is a business development and commercialization engine whose mission is to translate UofT’s large portfolio of early stage biologics into high-value assets and products. To this purpose, CCAB has partnered with NRC to biomanufacture and test hundreds of antibodies. The collaboration continues to grow and now leverages NRC’s three programs in Human Health Therapeutics:
  • Biologics and Biomanufacturing: producing biologics, testing their ability to fight solid tumours, and determining their biomanufacturability;
  • Therapeutics Beyond Brain Barriers: determining if specific antibodies are able to cross the blood-brain barrier, target and fight brain cancer;
  • Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics: determining if specific antibodies are able to modulate the immune system so that it finds and destroys cancer cells.
The goal of the collaboration is to identify the most promising antibodies, and increase their value by generating data that effectively de-risks each asset. CCAB’s objective is to then licence lead antibody candidates to seed newly formed Canadian biotechnology companies.  These new Canadian start-ups will, in turn, advance these molecules toward clinical trials in patients.  With several biotechnology companies already participating and benefitting from these programs, the collaboration between CCAB and NRC is clearly set to catalyze the country’s biotech sector and generate promising new cancer treatments for Canadians. Quotes “Harnessing the inventive power of our top Canadian scientists and translating discoveries into products that benefit Canadians is a priority for the CCAB.  We are excited about our collaboration with the NRC and the commercial value it creates for the Canadian biotechnology industry.” Ivan Waissbluth, Director of Business Development, Centre for the Commercialization of Antibodies and Biologics “It is very gratifying to deploy NRC’s biologics expertise, which is over 20 years in the making, to projects that may revolutionize the treatment of cancer. We are thrilled to be working with the Centre for the Commercialization of Antibodies and Biologics on accelerating the development of innovative medicines, to improve health outcomes for Canadians.” Roman Szumski, Vice-president of Life Sciences, NRC “The University of Toronto is proud to see the impact that CCAB is having in driving antibody development in Canada. Bridging the strengths of our discovery platform, the Toronto Recombinant Antibody Centre (TRAC), to the established capabilities at the NRC is a key factor in advancing therapeutics.  Today’s announcement shows promise of a growing partnership and U of T is looking forward to seeing the successes that arise from it.” Vivek Goel, Vice-President Research and Innovation, University of Toronto Additional Links http://www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/eng/rd/hht/index.html http://ccabcanada.com/license-assets-start-companies/ http://trac.utoronto.ca/ -30- Media Relations Team National Research Council of Canada 613-991-1431 1-855-282-1637 (24/7) media@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca Twitter: @nrc_cnrc Christine Misquitta Vice President - Administration and Communications Centre for the Commercialization of Antibodies and Biologics 647-715-2305 christine.misquitta@ccabcanada.com Twitter: @CCABcan and @TRACantibodies Media Relations University of Toronto 416-978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – The Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto and the Sciences Po School of Public Affairs in Paris are launching a dual degree program between their respective Master of Global Affairs (MGA) and Master in Public Policy (MPP). The program offers multiple pathways for students in two major world cities. Students will complete the dual degree program in 24 months, spending the first year at Sciences Po in Paris and the second year at the Munk School of Global Affairs in Toronto. All students will complete an internship (12-16 weeks) during the summer of the first year. This dual Master's degree program builds on a long-standing collaboration between Sciences Po and the University of Toronto, whose first exchange program was created in 2001. Studying at leading institutions in both Paris and Toronto, students will benefit from varied perspectives on public policies and global affairs in two different contexts (European and North American), thus enhancing their own global experience. By combining a Master in Public Policy with a Master of Global Affairs, students will gain complementary perspectives on the pressing challenges of the 21st century, drawing upon the outstanding academic strengths of each institution. Graduates of the dual degree program will be uniquely positioned to enter the field of global affairs worldwide.   “This dual master’s degree is a first for the Munk School and we’re thrilled to have an experienced partner in Sciences Po,” said Stephen Toope, Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs. “It’s fashionable today to focus on cracks in Europe, but however the winds shift, these are strong countries that will be leaders in shaping the world’s future. We need to build bridges and understanding.” "We are very glad to combine for the first time our Master in Public Policy with a Master of Global Affairs provided by the Munk School,” said Yann Algan, dean of the Sciences Po School of Public Affairs. “This dual degree aims to bring to our future public affairs professionals a unique and complementary understanding of global challenges." Students may choose to study in English or French at Sciences Po. At the Munk School of Global Affairs, courses will be taught in English. The first cohort of students in the dual degree program will start classes in Paris in September 2018 with an expected intake of 10 to 12 students. More information on the dual degree http://munkschool.utoronto.ca/mga/joint-degrees/ http://www.sciencespo.fr/public/en/content/dual-degree-munk-school-global-affairs-university-toronto-canada About the Munk School of Global Affairs The Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto unites people who are passionate to address the problems of a fast-changing world. Our aspiration is to create a unique, world-leading centre of teaching, research and public engagement that builds the new field of global affairs from Canada. For more information, please visit http://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ About the Sciences Po School of Public Affairs The Sciences Po School of Public Affairs aims to educate a new generation of leaders who want to address humanity’s most pressing challenges and find innovative solutions for the common good. The School offers two 2-year programs: the Master in Public Policy and the Master in European Affairs, where students choose to specialize in one of 11 policy streams, and also two 1-year master's programs for mid-career professionals: the Master in Public Affairs and the Experimental Program in Political Arts. In addition the Sciences Po School of Public Affairs offers training programs for French and European-level civil service exams as well as houses the Policy Lab, which mobilizes students to develop creative and concrete technological and policy solutions to complex policy issues. The School currently offers dual degrees with 11 international and French partner universities and is a founding member of the Global Public Policy Network (GPPN), which brings together seven top public affairs schools from around the world. For more information about the Sciences Po School of Public Affairs, please visit http://www.sciencespo.fr/public/en About the University of Toronto Established in 1827, the University of Toronto is Canada’s largest university, recognized as a global leader in research and teaching. The university consistently ranks among the top 25 universities in the world. Its distinguished faculty, institutional record of ground-breaking scholarship and wealth of innovative academic opportunities continually attract outstanding academics and students from around the world. For more information, please visit https://www.utoronto.ca/ About Sciences Po Founded in 1872, Sciences Po is France’s leading research university in the social sciences. Sciences Po offers degrees at the undergraduate, graduate and executive education levels, and has developed 42 dual degree programs with its network of 470 partner universities. Today, half of Sciences Po’s 13,000 students are international, representing 150 nationalities. Education at Sciences Po is multidisciplinary, multilingual and outward-looking. It also places great emphasis on professional exposure. Following completion of their degree, 80% of graduates are hired within six months and 39% start their careers abroad. Sciences Po maintains a high standard of social responsibility, and plays a pioneering role in the promotion of diversity and equal opportunities in higher education. Sciences Po offers an array of financial aid for students of all origins and 30% of the student body holds a scholarship. For more information about Sciences Po, please visit http://www.sciencespo.fr/en Media contact Sciences Po: Marie Frocrain, marie.frocrain@sciencespo.fr / +33 1 49 54 37 71 Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto: Dena Allen, dena.allen@utoronto.ca / +1 416 946 0123

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – Seven faculty members at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management have received awards for achievements in research and teaching. Four faculty members were awarded with the 2016 Roger Martin Awards for Excellence in Research and Teaching. Established by Prof. Roger Martin, a former Dean of the Rotman School, the awards are presented annually to faculty members who have achieved distinction for their teaching or research activities. The co-winners of the Roger Martin Excellence in Research Award are Prof. Joshua Gans and Prof. Peter Christoffersen. The co-winners of the Roger Martin Excellence in Teaching Award are Prof. Mikhail Simutin and Prof.  Avi Goldfarb. Two faculty members have also received the newly established Outstanding Research Impact Award which recognizes research and intellectual activities which have a significant impact on external non-academic audiences including the business and public policy communities both locally and internationally. The co-winners for 2016/17 are Prof. Nina Mažar and Prof. Dilip Soman. Prof. Ajay Agrawal is the winner of the Distinguished Scholarly Contribution Award which recognizes and encourages research and research-related service that contribute to the development of a robust and dynamic research environment within and beyond the Rotman community. Joshua Gans is a professor of strategic management and holder of the Jeffrey S. Skoll Chair of Technical Innovation and Entrepreneurship at the Rotman School (with a cross appointment in the Department of Economics). Since 2013, he has also been Area Coordinator of Strategic Management. He is also Chief Economist of the Rotman School’s Creative Destruction Lab. He holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University and an honors degree in economics from the University of Queensland. His research is primarily focused on understanding the economic drivers of innovation and scientific progress, and has core interests in digital strategy and antitrust policy. His recent book, The Disruption Dilemma, published by The MIT Press in 2016, explained why some companies have successfully managed disruption and why some have not. Peter Christoffersen is a professor of finance at the Rotman School and holds the TSX Chair in Capital Markets. He is also a fellow at the Bank of Canada. His main research interests are in volatility modeling for option valuation as well as in developing back testing procedures for risk management systems. He is the author of the Elements of Financial Risk Management, Second Edition (Academic Press, December 2011). He has won research awards from the Q-Group, KPMG, the Montreal Exchange, and STOXX. He has given invited lectures at the Bank of America, the Bank of Canada, the European Central Bank, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve, and the International Monetary Fund among others. Since 2012, he has also been a member of the Model Validation Council at the Board of Governors of the U.S. Federal Reserve System. His PhD is from the University of Pennsylvania. Mikhail Simutin is an assistant professor of finance at the Rotman School. Since 2012 he has taught a finance course in the first year of the Rotman MBA program regularly receiving high marks from his students in their course evaluations. His research interests include empirical asset pricing, mutual funds, and risk and performance measurement. His work has appeared in Journal of Financial Economics and Financial Management. His PhD is from the University of British Columbia. Avi Goldfarb is the Ellison Professor of Marketing at the Rotman School. He teaches courses on data, marketing, and digitization in several of the Rotman School’s programs. His research focuses on understanding the opportunities and challenges of the digital economy and he has published over 60 academic articles in a wide range of journals.  He is Chief Data Scientist of the Creative Destruction Lab, Senior Editor at Marketing Science, a fellow at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman research group, and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Northwestern University. Nina Mažar is an associate professor of marketing. Dilip Soman is a professor of marketing and holds the Corus Chair in Communications Strategy at the Rotman School. Profs. Mazar and Soman are co-directors of the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) which is a research cluster that partners with non-profit organizations, companies, and governmental agencies to use research findings to solve social problems such as financial literacy, obesity, and fraud. BEAR, and its partners, combine decades of research in decision-making with empirically-tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. Prof. Soman’s research is in the area of behavioural economics and its applications to consumer wellbeing, marketing and policy. He works with ideas42 and serves as advisor to a number of welfare organizations. In 2016, he was appointed to the Privy Council Office in the Canadian Federal Government as a Senior Policy Advisor in its Innovation Hub in Ottawa. His PhD is from the University of Toronto. Prof. Mažar is a Fellow of the Science Leadership Program in Canada and was named one of “The 40 Most Outstanding B-School Profs Under 40 In The World” by Poets&Quants in 2014. With her focus on behavioural economics, she investigates consumer behaviour, how it deviates from standard economic assumptions, and its implications for policy. She serves as advisor to a number of organizations around the world. In 2015, Nina was appointed to the World Bank as the Senior Behavioural Scientist of its new Global INsights Initiative (GINI) in Washington, DC. She holds a Dr. rer. pol. (Ph.D. equivalent) from Johannes Gutenberg University in Germany. Ajay Agrawal is the Peter Munk Professor of Entrepreneurship at the Rotman School and the Founder and Academic Director of the School’s Creative Destruction Lab. The CDL leverages the Rotman School's leading faculty and industry network as well as its location in the heart of Canada’s business capital to accelerate massively scalable, technology-based ventures that have the potential to transform our economic and social landscape. Since its inception, companies who have graduated from the program have gone on to create more than $950 million (CDN) in equity value.  Prof. Agrawal is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and Co-Founder of The Next 36. He teaches courses on business strategy, innovation, and entrepreneurship and conducts research on the economics of innovation and creativity. His PhD is from the University of British Columbia. The Rotman School of Management is located in the heart of Canada’s commercial and cultural capital and is part of the University of Toronto, one of the world’s top 20 research universities. The Rotman School fosters a new way to think that enables our graduates to tackle today’s global business and societal challenges.  For more information, visit www.rotman.utoronto.ca. -30- Ken McGuffin Manager, Media Relations Rotman School of Management University of Toronto Tel: 416-946-3818 E-mail: mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – For the second year in row a team from the Master of Financial Engineering program at Baruch College in New York City has won the Rotman International Trading Competition. The 14th annual edition of one of the world’s preeminent trading competitions was hosted by the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management from February 23 to 25. Teams representing 52 different universities from across Canada, the United States, Europe, Africa and Asia participated in the competition which took place in the Rotman School’s BMO Financial Group Finance Research and Trading Lab and utilized the Rotman Interactive Trader, an order-driven market simulator, which was developed in-house at the Rotman School. Placing second overall was a team from the University of Calgary while a team from LUISS Guido Carli University of Rome continued a string of strong performances by finishing third. A team with representatives from the Rotman School’s Master of Financial Risk Management and UofT’s Master of Financial Engineering, Computer Science, and UTSC Bachelor of Business Administration programs placed seventh. In the individual cases LUISS Guido Carli University of Rome was the top performer in the Volatility Trading Case; University of Waterloo came out on top in the Credit Risk Case; Baruch College won the Algorithmic Trading Case; HEC Montréal was the top performer in the Flow Traders ETF Case; University of Connecticut won the Quantitative Open Outcry Case; and the University of Calgary was first in the Commodities Case. BP was the main sponsor of the competition and also sponsored the BP Commodities Trading Case. Other case sponsors included Flow Traders, MathWorks, and S&P Global Market Intelligence. DRW Trading Group was a bronze sponsor. The Rotman School’s BMO Financial Group Finance Research and Trading Lab is designed to promote experiential learning in the area of financial markets and data. The competition cases are implemented on the highly acclaimed Rotman Interactive Trader application, a market simulation tool being used in over 50 universities and financial institutions around the world. The Lab is utilized by classes in many of the Rotman School’s programs including its Master of Finance, Master of Financial Risk Management, MBA and Rotman Commerce programs.  Further information on the lab is available at http://financelab.rotman.utoronto.ca/ The Rotman School of Management is located in the heart of Canada’s commercial and cultural capital and is part of the University of Toronto, one of the world’s top 20 research universities. The Rotman School fosters a new way to think that enables our graduates to tackle today’s global business and societal challenges.  For more information, visit www.rotman.utoronto.ca. -30- Ken McGuffin Manager, Media Relations Rotman School of Management University of Toronto Tel: 416-946-3818 E-mail: mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – Nothing inspires consumer frustration quite like an airline flight delay. Researchers from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management have used those meltdown moments - and the complaints they produce via the social media platform Twitter - to study how consumer "voice" may influence business behaviour. "We thought complaints were an important part of the economy but, until now, we haven’t had a systematic way to measure them," says study co-author Mara Lederman, an associate professor of strategic management at Rotman. The accepted idea among economists is that markets act to discipline companies for poor performance as consumers will withdraw their business if they are not happy. Complaining – as opposed to switching - has been suggested as an alternate mechanism but, to date, has received much less attention. The public nature of social media, however, now makes it possible to track consumer complaints, the market circumstances under which they're made and how companies respond. This opens the door for studies that examine the purpose and impact of customer voice. Not surprisingly, the researchers found that passenger complaints via Twitter increase when an airline's "on-time" performance worsened.  This was based on an analysis of approximately four million Tweets made to or about the top seven American airlines over a two-year period. What was more interesting is that the same deterioration in on-time performance generated about 50 percent more complaints when the airline was the dominant carrier in the passenger’s local market. Airlines also responded more often when competition was limited and when the passenger mentioned the airline's loyalty program in their tweet. These finding suggest that companies in low competition markets may have the most to lose from ticked-off customers because these customers generate high margins yet have the ability to go elsewhere if they are not happy, says Prof. Lederman. The same goes for customers who are invested in a company’s loyalty program– these are the very customers that are costly for the company to lose. "In markets where you don't have a lot of competition, but you have some, voice might be effective because this precisely when companies will care to retain customers who have been made unhappy," she says. Prof. Lederman carried out the study with fellow Rotman researchers Joshua Gans, a professor of strategic management and Avi Goldfarb, a professor of marketing. Their results suggest using social media to complain can be worthwhile, so long as a company values the customer enough to respond and offer some incentive for them to stay (whether monetary or simply a promise to do better in the future). Companies, meanwhile, may want to consider setting up dedicated complaint channels as a way of retaining valuable customers who might be at risk of leaving, says Prof. Lederman. The complete study is available at: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2889388. For the latest thinking on business, management and economics from the Rotman School of Management, visit www.rotman.utoronto.ca/FacultyAndResearch/NewThinking.aspx. The Rotman School of Management is located in the heart of Canada’s commercial and cultural capital and is part of the University of Toronto, one of the world’s top 20 research universities. The Rotman School fosters a new way to think that enables our graduates to tackle today’s global business challenges.  For more information, visit www.rotman.utoronto.ca. -30- Ken McGuffin Manager, Media Relations Rotman School of Management University of Toronto Tel: 416-946-3818 E-mail: mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Future mining engineers from 10 Canadian universities go toe to toe in national competition WHAT: The Canadian Mining Games is an annual competition between 10 mining engineering universities in Canada. At this two-day championship, student teams are tested on the skills and knowledge required to work in the mining industry as they complete a series of events inspired and overseen by industry-leading companies. Members of the media are invited to observe or compete alongside students in events including:
  • Proposing technical and economic response to a hypothetical crisis situation, such as a mud slide;
  • Executing a mine rescue scenario. In a confined space full of smoke with limited visibility, students rely on safety equipment and breathing apparatuses to rescue trapped miners;
  • Conducting an in-depth preliminary economic assessment and feasibility study of a proposed mine design.
In addition to competing for school pride, students have the opportunity to network with industry leaders in their fields. The winning team will take home the coveted Mining Games trophy and the title of champion of the Canadian Mining Games. WHERE: Department of Civil & Mineral Engineering, University of Toronto Meeting point: Galbraith Building, 35 St. George Street [MAP] WHEN: February 24-25, 2017 Start time: 8:30 a.m. INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITIES:
  • Henrique Coppini – Mining Games Organizing Committee & past participant
  • Channa Kummarage – Mining Games Organizing Committee & past captain
  • Marina Reny – U of T Team captain
-30- MEDIA CONTACT: Keenan Dixon Communications Coordinator Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto 647-209-1176 keenan.dixon@utoronto.ca  

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto will recognize 16 outstanding individuals with honorary degrees from Indigenous political and cultural leaders to an internationally renowned photographer and a pioneering pair of evolutionary biologists. The recipients include Inuk singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark, leading Arab human rights defender Amal Basha, the “archaeologist of black memory” Robert A. Hill, and chief commissioner of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Murray Sinclair. They’ll receive their degrees at upcoming convocation ceremonies and address a graduating class. “The University of Toronto is proud to honour this diverse group of truly extraordinary leaders,” said President Meric Gertler. “They have demonstrated excellence and tenacity in their fields, from music to law, business to health care, science to journalism, and will be an inspiring reminder to our graduates and all in attendance of the power of individuals to create real, meaningful change.” The honorary degree recipients are: Susan Aglukark – A celebrated Inuk singer and songwriter, she has bridged the worlds of traditional Inuit culture and the entertainment industry. Throughout her career, whether through song, volunteer work or advocacy, Aglukark has taken the experiences of her youth and the challenges of northern communities and found ways to promote change and healing. (photo by Denise Grant Photography) Sir George Alleyne – An advocate for equity in public health and development in the Caribbean, he was the first Caribbean person to be appointed director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). From 2003-2010, Alleyne served as the UN Secretary-General’s special envoy for HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean region. He is currently chancellor and emeritus professor of the University of the West Indies and director emeritus of PAHO. Amal Basha – A leading advocate for the rule of law, gender equality, and human rights in the Arab world, she is the founder of the Sisters Arab Forum for Human Rights in Yemen. At great personal risk, she has pressed the Yemeni government to uphold its obligations under international humanitarian law, especially UN conventions against torture and discrimination against women. She has also promoted the International Criminal Court as a mechanism for protecting the basic rights of vulnerable people in the absence of a functioning state. Edward Burtynsky – One of Canada's most respected photographers, his work depicting global industrial landscapes can be seen in more than 60 major museums around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Early exposure to the sites and images of the General Motors plant in his hometown of St. Catharines, helped develop his photographic work. His imagery explores the collective human impact on the surface of the planet and is an inspection of the systems humans have imposed onto natural landscapes. (photo by Martin Lipman) John M. Cassaday – A distinguished Canadian business leader and University of Toronto alumnus, he has transformed the Canadian television industry, first as president and CEO of CTV and later as founding president and CEO of Corus Entertainment. In addition, he has significantly shaped the Canadian business landscape through his extensive service as a corporate director and is known as one of Toronto’s most dedicated and effective fundraisers, having co-chaired successful major fundraising campaigns for the Rotman School of Management and St. Michael's Hospital. Larry Phillip (Phil) Fontaine – A courageous Indigenous leader, he played a pivotal role in bringing the issue of residential schools to national attention. While serving as national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, he successfully negotiated the Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, resolving the largest class action in Canadian history and providing innovative ways to honour survivors and preserve their stories. In addition to financial compensation, the agreement helped establish the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. (photo by Fred Cattroll photos) B. Rosemary Grant & Peter Grant – Among the most storied and accomplished biologists of this generation, their four decades of work on the evolution of the Galapagos finches has become the most important empirical work on evolution in nature since Darwin. Recognized throughout the scientific community, the professors emeriti at Princeton University were awarded the Kyoto Prize in 2009 for their remarkable contributions to the sciences. Together, they discovered that evolution by natural selection can be seen within one’s lifetime, proving one of Darwin’s theories incorrect. Robert A. Hill – Aptly referred to as the “archaeologist of black memory,” this U of T alumnus is the world’s leading authority on the global influence and intellectual currents of Pan-Africanism in the 20th century. Hill, a professor emeritus at UCLA, has amassed a crucial archive of Cyril Brigg’s pioneering New Negro journal, The Crusader, and the manuscript of L.L.R. James’ unpublished masterpiece, American Civilization. As editor-in-chief of the Marcus Garvey and Universal Negro Improvement Association Papers, he has published 14 volumes to date on the mass movement inspired by the Jamaican activist. Catherine Lacavera – A globally recognized leader in the field of intellectual property law, she has led a team of lawyers in successfully defending more than a thousand patent and other global intellectual property claims as director of IP and litigation for Google Inc. Lacavera's work has affirmed the legality and ensured the continued availability of a free and open Internet, user-generated content platforms, content streaming and many other innovative technologies. She is a three-time graduate of the University of Toronto, serves on the advisory board for U of T’s department of electrical and computer engineering and is actively involved with The Entrepreneurship Hatchery within the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering. Margaret O. MacMillan – A distinguished historian, she is renowned both for her academic work and as a public intellectual. She is best known for her award-winning book, Paris 1919: Six Months that Changed the World, which examined the diplomatic aftermath of the First World War. Her most recent book is History’s People: Personality and History. She is currently warden of St. Antony’s College and a professor of international history, University of Oxford (she is on leave from U of T's department of history).  She is also a graduate and former provost of Trinity College. Peter Mansbridge – As chief correspondent for CBC News, anchor of The National, and host of Mansbridge: One on One, he has had an extraordinary impact on Canadian politics, culture and society. Mansbridge has announced that after anchoring Canada Day coverage this year, he will retire. Through his career, he has helped foster an informed, enlightened, critically intelligent and expansive national conversation. He has also been a reassuring and welcome presence for generations of Canadians. In particular, at times of national celebration and crisis, he is a trusted and authoritative voice. (photo courtesy of CBC) Arthur B. McDonald – Co-winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics, he has played a pivotal global role in advancing the field of particle astrophysics. The Queen’s University professor has made outstanding contributions to measuring the properties of basic neutrinos (subatomic particles considered the basic building blocks of the universe), as well as solar models, which have significant implications for our understanding of the universe and its development. He is director of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and associate director of SNOLAB, an underground science laboratory near that northern Ontario city. André Picard – A bestselling author and a Canadian health-care advocate, he is best known for his award-winning work as a reporter and columnist for The Globe and Mail, where he has been a staff writer since 1987. Picard’s writing on important health issues, from the HIV/AIDS crisis in the 1980s to today’s nursing shortage, has transcended daily journalism to take a wider and longer term view of key issues in health policy, elevating debates about health care and related policy issues locally, nationally, and globally. Reeta Roy – A compassionate anti-poverty advocate, she has devoted her career to breaking down barriers and improving the lives of economically disadvantaged communities across Africa, particularly of women and girls, through her leadership of public and private foundations. Since 2008, Roy has been President and CEO of The MasterCard Foundation. Under her leadership, the Foundation created the $800-million MasterCard Foundation Scholars Program, which partners with over 20 educational institutions around the world, including U of T, to provide scholarships to enable qualified students from Sub-Saharan Africa to attend university. Murray Sinclair – As chief commissioner of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, he participated in hundreds of hearings across Canada and worked tirelessly to ensure that survivors of the Indian Residential Schools had the opportunity to testify. The report and its 94 recommendations have sparked a major re-examination of how Canadians see themselves and provide clear guidelines on the steps that must be taken to adequately address the debt to the Indigenous peoples. Sinclair is also a Canadian senator and served as co-chair of the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry in Manitoba from 1988 to 1991. -30- For more information: University of Toronto Media Relations Tel: 416-978-0100 Email: media.relations@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

April 26, 2017

Paleontologists trace origin of millipedes, crabs and insects to new 508 million-year-old sea creature with “can opener”- like pincers

Toronto, ON – Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature. The creature, named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, is a new and exceptionally well-preserved fossilized…

April 25, 2017

OPEN IMPACT launches to help Canadian investors find their social and environmental impact – and bring impact investing to the mainstream

Toronto, ON – OPEN IMPACT, an online resource to help investors find financial investment products that make money – and make the world a better place – launched today at www.openimpact.ca. Impact investing is a fast-growing approach to investing that seeks financial returns as well as measurable social and/or environmental impact. According to a JP Morgan/Global Impact Investment Network study, the global market for impact investments surpassed US$60 billion in 2015 and may grow to US$2 trillion by 2025. In…

April 17, 2017

Older Victims of Fraud Have Poorer Cognitive Skills and are Less Conscientious, Honest

Toronto, ON – When comparing victims of fraud to those who had never been victimized, lead authors Dr. Kang Lee and doctoral researcher Rebecca Judges at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with researchers at Ryerson University, found that older victims have poorer cognitive abilities in everyday activities and are less conscientious and less honest than non-victims of the same age group. Results of the study, ‘The Role of Cognition, Personality, and…

April 13, 2017

We (can’t) Chat: “709 Crackdown” Discussion Blocked on Weibo and WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, published a report today that reveals how discussions about a nationwide government crackdown on rights lawyers and activists in China are censored on WeChat and Weibo, two of the leading social networks in China. The crackdown is dubbed “709 Crackdown” as the first enforced disappearances of targeted individuals took place on July 9, 2015, and has since affected over 250 Chinese…

April 11, 2017

Engineering students tackle eight problems nagging Toronto communities

Toronto, ON –  First-year students in U of T Engineering are stepping up to take on some of the Greater Toronto Area’s most persistent problems, from diagnosing infant epilepsy to finding lost arrows at a local archery range. This Wednesday, April 12, students at the University of Toronto are hosting a day-long event to showcase their engineering solutions, from the technically complex to the stunningly obvious, to some of the GTA’s stickiest situations with a wide variety of prototypes, renderings,…

April 11, 2017

The New Urban Crisis

Toronto, ON – The numbers don’t lie. In 2013 the Pew Research Center conducted a study that found that 61 percent of Americans felt that the current economic state favored the rich over the poor. That’s no wonder considering the stark gap that has grown between the different groups in the United States. The U.S. middle-to-upper class is made up of approximately 40 million people, accounts for a third of the U.S. work force, and is responsible for considerably shaping…

April 11, 2017

Infants show racial bias toward members of own race and against those of other races

Toronto, ON – Two studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and their collaborators from the US, UK, France and China, show that six- to nine-month-old infants demonstrate racial bias in favour of members of their own race and racial bias against those of other races. In the first study, “Older but not younger infants associate own-race faces with happy music and other-race faces with sad music”, published in Developmental…

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U of T in the News

Metro News | April 28, 2017

Find a first draft of The Handmaid's Tale at the University of Toronto

Jennifer Toews of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book library comments on the resurgent popularity of U of T’s collection of manuscripts of The Handmaid’s Tale. Read more. 

Washington Post | April 27, 2017

This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth

Cédric Aria and Jean-Bernard Caron, both of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, describe the importance of the newest creatures uncovered at a fossil site in B.C. Read more.

Toronto Star | April 26, 2017

TTC subway system 10 times more polluted than outside, study shows

A new study co-authored by U of T Engineering Professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions – and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada. Read more.