Media Releases

Chemical Engineering presents Lectures at the Leading Edge

September 28, 2011

TORONTO, ON – On Wednesday, October 5, 2011, the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry at the University of Toronto will kick off its 18 part Lectures at the Leading Edge series. As you might have guessed from the title, the idea for the series is to highlight groundbreaking research and inspire fresh discussion.

“Our aim is to enhance the field of chemical engineering. By providing a rich view of the diverse world landscape, new opportunities relating to education and research may be uncovered,” says Tim Bender, a professor at the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry and organizational lead for the series.

For over 15 years, Lectures at the Leading Edge has been one of the most popular programs offered to the public by the Department. This year, attending speakers include world-renowned scientists, researchers, professors and industry leaders.

On October 5, Andrei Osterman from Sanford’s Burnham Medical Research Institute will present “Integrated Genomic Reconstruction of Microbial Metabolic and Regulatory Network.” On October 12, William Reichert from Duke University will discuss “Autologous, Patient-Derived EPCs for Vascular Graft Endothelialization,” and on October 19, Rakesh Jain from Harvard Medical School will present the Irving O. Shoichet Distinguished Lecture on “Delivery of Molecular and Nano-medicine in Tumors.”

If you’re in the Toronto area, consider sitting in on a few talks. With the exception of Richard Luthy’s presentation, all lectures will take place on a Wednesday at 12:30 pm in Room 116 of the Wallberg Building, 200 College Street. See the full list of speakers – with titles, dates and times – by clicking here.

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For more information, please contact:

Jennifer Hsu
Manager of External Relations
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering
Tel: 416-978-8770
Fax: 416-978-8605
jennifer.hsu@utoronto.ca
www.chem-eng.utoronto.ca