Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their support of institutions dedicated to advancing the academic study of Buddhism. I’m very proud that the University of Toronto, my alma mater, now hosts a centre that bears the foundation’s name,” commented the Honourable Dr. Vivienne Poy, Chancellor Emerita of the University of Toronto. “It will be a catalyst for innovation and new insights into Buddhism’s place in society.” The Centre’s inaugural director is Professor Frances Garrett (PhD, University of Virginia), a professor of Tibetan and Buddhist studies and the associate chair of the Department for the Study of Religion in U of T’s Faculty of Arts & Science. “This is an exciting time for Buddhist studies at the University of Toronto,” says Garrett. “Our scholars reflect the amazing breadth and richness of the tradition: they are delving into Buddhist ritual, art, philosophy, medicine and other intellectual developments and modes of practice in regions throughout Asia. This support creates, for the first time, a University-wide locus for advancing research, teaching and public education on an extraordinarily rich and diverse global tradition.” The University of Toronto will join an elite global network of Buddhist studies initiatives which have received funding from The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation, including those at the Courtauld Institute of Art in the United Kingdom, the University of British Columbia in Canada, and Harvard and Stanford universities in the United States. “A key objective of The Robert H.N. Ho Family Foundation is to establish a global network of outstanding scholarship in order to develop awareness and understanding of Buddhism and its relevance to contemporary society,” says Ted Lipman, the foundation’s CEO.  “This goal is being realized through our collaboration with the University of Toronto.  We are confident the University’s commitment to Buddhist studies and the establishment of this new centre will foster deeper insight into the meaning and context of Buddhism.” The endowment will support academic training, collaborative research with graduate and undergraduate students, as well as a program of events that engage scholars and the public seeking to deepen understanding of the diversity of Buddhist traditions around the world. The inaugural year will feature an exciting lineup of activities, including an undergraduate research trip to the Himalayas in the spring, a film series on Buddhism and the environment, and a scholarly reading group on Dunhuang manuscripts, which are a cache of important religious documents dating from the 5th to 11th centuries discovered in the Mogao Caves in Dunhuang, China. Also being planned for August 2017 is the annual meeting of the International Association of Buddhist Studies, the largest gathering of Buddhist scholars that will be held in Canada for the first time supported by this gift. “Having this centre located in the heart of the most religiously diverse city in the world—among which is a veritable mosaic of Buddhist communities—will position the University perfectly to facilitate intellectually informed and publicly-minded conversations on Buddhism, in terms of both its historical context and its place in contemporary society,” says Professor David Cameron, Dean of U of T’s Faculty of Arts & Science. “We are proud to be a Canadian steward of The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation’s legacy and vision.” ABOUT THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO Established in 1827, the University of Toronto is Canada’s largest university, recognized as a global leader in research and teaching.  The university consistently ranks among the top 25 universities in the world. Its distinguished faculty, institutional record of ground-breaking scholarship and wealth of innovative academic opportunities continually attract outstanding academics and students from around the world. ABOUT THE ROBERT H. N. HO FAMILY FOUNDATION Established in 2005, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation is a private philanthropic organization based in Hong Kong. The Foundation’s dual mission is to foster appreciation of Chinese arts and culture to advance global learning and to cultivate deeper understanding of Buddhism in the context of contemporary life. The Foundation supports efforts that make Chinese arts—from ancient times to today—approachable and relevant to audience worldwide. It encourages the creation of works, exhibitions and publications that offer original perspectives and improve the quality and accessibility of Chinese arts scholarship. Guided by a belief that insights of Buddhism have a vital role to play in locating solutions to the challenges facing contemporary society, the Foundation seeks to expand understanding of Buddhist principles. Its current support to Buddhism includes the Buddhist Ministry Initiative at Harvard Divinity School; a centre and an endowed professorship in Buddhist studies at Stanford University; an endowed chair and program in Buddhism and Contemporary Society at the University of British Columbia; a Centre and graduate degree program for Buddhist art and conservation at The Courtauld Institute of Art; a series of Buddhist studies grants administered by the American Council of Learned Societies; the Galleries of Buddhist Art at the Victoria and Albert Museum; and presentation of art exhibitions around the world. To learn more about The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation and its activities, visit www.rhfamilyfoundation.org Media Contact Frances Garrett Director The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies University of Toronto Email: frances.garrett@utoronto.ca Diana Kuprel Director of Alumni Relations & Advancement Communications Faculty of Arts & Science, University of Toronto Tel: 416-946-3118 Email: d.kuprel@utoronto.ca Ted Lipman CEO The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Tel: +852 2232 0088 Email: tedlipman@rhfamilyfoundation.org Janet Tong PR & Communications The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Tel: +852 2232 0001 Email: jtong@rhfamilyfoundation.org The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies: buddhiststudies.utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
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U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching children about biological camouflage. Overall, preschoolers learned about camouflage from both books. But, when researchers divided the four-year-olds into two groups – one group with children of higher than average vocabulary level, and one group of children with average and lower English vocabularies – they found that the children with average and lower English vocabularies showed poorer comprehension when the book read itself. Interaction is key Dr. Patricia Ganea, Associate Professor of early cognitive development at the Dr. Eric Jackman Institute of Child Study at OISE, says the results highlight that young children are best supported in their learning when they are in interaction with others, especially parents or other caregivers. “These findings are important since they show that children at risk for low comprehension benefit from having an adult read with them, rather than being left to learn from the digital device on their own,” said Ganea. “Choosing high quality apps is only part of the equation. Reading along with the child can also increase learning.” Dr. Gabrielle Strouse, a postdoctoral fellow who worked with Ganea on the study, and who is now at the University of South Dakota, agreed. “Children may learn from digital media on their own, but parents still play an important role in children’s learning. Parents can enhance what children take away from digital media by asking questions, directing their attention to relevant information and participating with them in the media interaction,” Strouse added. Children’s comprehension tested The study was conducted by giving children a pre-test about biological camouflage using pictures of animals. Children were then read an e-book about camouflage by the e-book voiceover or by an adult. Afterward, children were asked questions about camouflage using replica lizard and turtles in tanks. They were asked to identify which animals would be seen by a predator, which tank they would put an animal in so it would not be seen, and to explain their choices. Overall, researchers found the e-book to be an effective tool for teaching children the new biological concept:
  • Overall, 74% of children explained their answers in terms of camouflage at the post-test, compared to 2% at pre-test
  • Children with above-average vocabularies did well on the camouflage post-test regardless of whether the adult or the book read to them.
  • However, children with average and lower vocabularies did particularly poorly when read to by the book’s voiceover
Also noteworthy, the findings are consistent with the emphasis on parent co-use of media in the American Academy of Pediatrics’ newly updated guidelines on children’s media exposure. The study, “Are Prompts Provided by Electronic Books as Effective for Teaching Preschoolers a Biological Concept as Those Provided by Adults?” was published in the November/December edition of Early Education and Development. To view the study, please click here. - 30 - MEDIA CONTACTS: Researchers Patricia Ganea Associate Professor, Dr. Eric Jackman Institute for Child Study OISE/University of Toronto Email: patricia.ganea@utoronto.ca Phone: 416-934-4502 Gabrielle Strouse Assistant Professor, University of South Dakota Email: Gabrielle.Strouse@usd.edu Phone:  605-677-5848 Parents The following parents have children who have participated in similar studies about technology and learning. These parents are available to speak with media about how their children experience computers, e-books and other forms of electronic media: Leigh Lahti leigh.lahti@gmail.com 416-534-8506 or 416-389-2556 (cell) Brook Alviano brookalviano@gmail.com 647-268-3661 Media Relations Coordinator Lindsey Craig Communications & Media Relations Coordinator OISE/University of Toronto lindsey.craig@utoronto.ca 416-978-1127  

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in the number of takeover deals and a 25 per cent drop in deal volume in response to major employment protection reforms that had been passed during the study period. When takeovers did happen, synergy gains from consolidation were cut by half. The paper, forthcoming in Journal of Financial Economics, marks the first systematic empirical evidence documenting the link between labour restructuring and takeovers around the world. "Everything starts from the potential for eliminating overlap," said Andrey Golubov, a Rotman assistant professor of finance and one of three study co-authors. "If the potential is not there, synergies are lower and deals don't happen." Increased labour protections were found to moderate post-merger layoffs, resulting in 7.4 per cent more jobs left behind after a merger than in places where no such strengthening had taken place. For an average combined firm workforce of 31,500 employees, that represents 2,200 jobs. While the value of takeover deals dropped in a heightened job protection environment, the researchers found that the price bidders paid did not drop as much as the expected gains from the merger, suggesting that both bidder and target firm shareholders bear the cost of increased labour protection. The study analyzed nearly 46,000 takeover deals in 21 countries between 1985 and 2007. Researchers compared OECD and another study's records on labour protection reforms passed during that period with data collected by Thomson Reuters about takeover activity during the same time. The data covered the world's most active takeover markets, including countries such as the United States, United Kingdom, Canada and Japan. Researchers controlled for such differences as the level of economic development and economic growth, corporate tax rates, political orientation of governments and union power. As an example of how national labour regulation can shape merger activity, the U.S. and New Zealand were among countries found with high takeover activity and comparatively low labour protections. In contrast, Italy and Spain were among those countries that saw higher levels job protection with relatively limited merger activity. The study was co-authored with Olivier Dessaint, an assistant professor of finance at the Rotman School and Professor Paolo Volpin of Cass Business School at City University London. For the latest thinking on business, management and economics from the Rotman School of Management, visit www.rotman.utoronto.ca/FacultyAndResearch/NewThinking.aspx. The Rotman School of Management is located in the heart of Canada's commercial and cultural capital and is part of the University of Toronto, one of the world's top 20 research universities. The Rotman School fosters a new way to think that enables our graduates to tackle today's global business and societal challenges. For more information, visit www.rotman.utoronto.ca. -30- For more information: Ken McGuffin Manager, Media Relations Rotman School of Management University of Toronto Tel: 416.946.3818 E-mail: mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca Follow Rotman on Twitter @rotmanschool Watch Rotman on You Tube www.youtube.com/rotmanschool

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – A team with four students from the Master of Financial Risk Management program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management won a risk management case competition, while two other teams from the Rotman Full Time MBA program made the finals of two prestigious international competitions. The Rotman MFRM team came out on top of the seventy-four teams representing sixteen universities who competed in the TD Securities Risk Management Case Competition. The competition tested students’ abilities to critically analyze and evaluate risk management scenarios. Six teams made the final round which took place in Toronto on November 16 where teams had to present to  a panel of executive members from TD Securities Capital Markets Risk Management & Market Risk Control. For their win, Rotman MFRM’17 students Kaspar Yang, Phoebe Cheung, Bryan Ding, and Sean Wang will spend one day job shadowing with analysts from a variety of TD Capital Markets Risk Management & Market Risk Control groups. In addition to this unique learning experience, each member will have an opportunity to interview for the Capital Markets Risk Management & Market Risk Control Summer Associate program for 2017. The team also included Jerry Fan, a UofT engineering student. A team of Rotman Full Time MBA students participated for the first time in the seventh edition of Rotterdam School of Management Private Equity Competition, which was held in Amsterdam over this past weekend. The team composed of  MBA students William Sapphire, MBA’17, Zdenko Teply, MBA’17, Grant Robson, MBA’17, Michael Amiraslani, MGA/MBA’17, and Aboud Qudimat, MBA’17, won a Rotman private equity competition to advance to the finals where they represented the Rotman School against teams from London Business School,  IMD, ESADE and TIAS School for Business and Society.  The RSM Private Equity Competition is the premier private equity case competition in the world, and it brings together teams from the world's leading business schools to learn, compete and network with professionals in private equity and finance. Teams analyzed a real case dealing with a European distressed company, and presenting their findings to a panel of judges from academia and  the private equity industry. A second team of Rotman Full Time MBA students reached the international final of the 2016 Global Prize Strategy Case Competition hosted by AT Kearney. The Rotman team composed of Zach McMahon, MBA’18, Tess Cecil-Cockwell, MBA’18, Adam Lambros, MBA’18, and Fatima Saya, MBA’18, had defeated teams from the University of Michigan, University of Chicago, Columbia University and Northwestern University in the North American finals but placed second to a team from HEC Paris in the finals held on November 18. The Rotman School of Management is located in the heart of Canada's commercial and cultural capital and is part of the University of Toronto, one of the world's top 20 research universities. The Rotman School fosters a new way to think that enables our graduates to tackle today's global business and societal challenges. For more information, visit www.rotman.utoronto.ca. -30- For more information: Ken McGuffin Manager, Media Relations Rotman School of Management University of Toronto Tel: 416.946.3818 E-mail: mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca Follow Rotman on Twitter @rotmanschool Watch Rotman on You Tube www.youtube.com/rotmanschool

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto have developed a process that dramatically cuts the amount of time it takes to create new cancer treatments. Using a new breakthrough technology, their study, published today in Nature Medicine, identified a new potential target for the treatment of a class of pancreatic cancer, and unveiled a new treatment option that exploits genetic faults to destroy cancer cells. Associate Professor Stephane Angers and PhD student Zachary Steinhart from the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, along with Drs. Jason Moffat and Sachdev Sidhu from the Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, the Department of Molecular Genetics, and the Centre for the Commercialization of Antibodies and Biologics, made this discovery using the cutting-edge CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology. Using this revolutionary tool, the team of researchers probed the function of every single gene expressed by pancreatic cancer cells to determine that one of the receptors (Frizzled-5) is essential for the growth of mutant pancreatic cancer cells. Normally, the signaling pathways activated by Frizzled-5 tell cells when to divide, what types of cells to become, and when they should die. When mutated or deregulated, however, they can initiate tumour growth. Having identified the key role that the Frizzled-5 receptor plays in promoting pancreatic cancer growth, the team rapidly developed an antibody drug to inhibit the growth of these cells. The study showed that the antibody proved highly effective in killing the cancer cells in patient-derived samples and shrank tumours in mice without damaging the surrounding healthy cells. Leveraging the Donnelly Centre’s state-of-the-art platform for custom antibody design, the team was able to create a targeted antibody in months – a fraction of the time it would normally take to develop a safe and effective treatment for a specific cancer. As part of this study, the team also explored the role of this receptor in colorectal cancer, a form of cancer that shares common features with pancreatic cancer. The results of this study indicate that Frizzled-5 may be a factor across multiple cancer types, broadening the potential use of anti-Frizzled-5 antibodies as a targeted cancer therapy. “Ultimately, this study revealed genetic vulnerabilities in pancreatic cancer cells that could be exploited through the development of new targeted antibodies to inhibit tumor growth,” noted Dr. Angers of the Centre for Pharmaceutical Oncology. “By targeting the exact signaling circuit activated in these tumors, these rapidly developed antibodies have shown considerable promise as a cancer treatment. Moreover, the state-of-the-art antibody development platform developed at U of T is a transformational leap forward in our ability to rapidly create exciting new treatments to combat various cancers.” - 30 - For more information about this exciting new discovery, please contact: Jef Ekins Manager, Marketing & Communications Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto 416-946-7036 j.ekins@utoronto.ca Jovana Drinjakovic Writer at the Donnelly Centre University of Toronto O: 416.946.8253 C: 416.543.7820 jovana.drinjakovic@gmail.com

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – Cancerous tumours are known to release cells into the bloodstream, and it is these circulating tumour cells or CTCs that are the sources of metastatic tumours – tumours that spread and form in distant locations in the body.  In fact, most patients who succumb to cancer do not die because of the initial tumours that form, but rather because of the deadly secondary metastatic tumours that appear at distant sites.  As a result, understanding the biology and clinical relevance of these traveling cells is critical in our fight against cancer. Monitoring circulating tumour cells, however, is a tremendous challenge as they are outnumbered in blood by healthy cells at a level of over 1 billion-to-1.  Moreover, they can display varied and dynamic properties, and the collection of CTCs found in the bloodstream of a cancer patient may have differing metastatic potential.  Consequently, efforts to integrate the analysis of these cells into mainstream clinical medicine have been limited because it has been difficult to pinpoint what types of cells and what phenotypic properties should be targeted.  But the potential of CTCs to allow the collection of a non-invasive “liquid biopsy” to monitor cancer progression is a tantalizing possibility that has continued to attract significant attention to this problem. A breakthrough by Professor Shana Kelley’s research group at the University of Toronto published in Nature Nanotechnology provides a new tool to characterize CTCs that may help cancer biologists and clinicians understand how to use these cells to provide better treatment.  Using magnetic nanoparticles, CTCs in blood samples were targeted based on proteins displayed on the cell surface, and separated based on the levels of the protein present.  Using a high–resolution microfluidic device, cells are then separated into 100 different capture zones to generate a profile that provides phenotypic information related to metastatic potential.  Using this approach and monitoring cells generated in animal models of cancer and in samples collected from prostate cancer patients, the properties of CTCs were shown to evolve and become more aggressive as tumours became more advanced. “Through this approach, we aimed to provide a new way to profile CTCs beyond simply counting their numbers in clinical samples,” explained Dr. Mahla Poudineh, lead student author on the paper.  “Instead, we wanted to provide phentotypic information that might allow these cells to be classified as benign or more dangerous, which would then inform treatment options.” “We were very fortunate to collaborate with a number of oncologists at the Sunnybrook Research Centre and Princess Margaret Hospital as we developed this technology so that we could test our approach with real patient specimens and better understand how to adapt it for use in the clinic,” noted Dr. Kelley. The Kelley group (http://www.kelleylaboratory.com/), along with collaborators in the Sargent group (http://www.light.utoronto.ca/) at the University of Toronto, hope to turn the approach they reported into a device that can be used by cancer researchers and eventually clinicians to allow CTC analysis to be monitored routinely and used to limit the progression of cancer. Read the paper, “Tracking the dynamics of circulating tumour cell phenotypes using nanoparticle-mediated magnetic ranking,” at Nature Nanotechnology: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nnano.2016.239. - 30 - For more information about this breakthrough discovery, please contact: Jef Ekins Manager, Marketing & Communications Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto 416-946-7036 j.ekins@utoronto.ca Shana Kelley Professor Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto 416-978-8641 shana.kelley@utoronto.ca  

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – The secret to a happy sex life in long-term relationships is the belief that it takes hard work and effort, instead of expecting sexual satisfaction to simply happen if you are true soulmates, says a study led by a University of Toronto (U of T) social psychology researcher. These “sexpectations” – the need to work on sexual growth or rely on sexual destiny – are so powerful they can either sustain otherwise healthy relationships or undermine them, says Jessica Maxwell, a PhD candidate in the Department of Psychology in the Faculty of Arts & Science at U of T. “People who believe in sexual destiny are using their sex life as a barometer for how well their relationship is doing, and they believe problems in the bedroom equal problems in the relationship as a whole,” says Maxwell. “Whereas people who believe in sexual growth not only believe they can work on their sexual problems, but they are not letting it affect their relationship satisfaction.” The findings are based on research involving approximately 1,900 participants, and the results published online today in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology included people from both heterosexual and same-sex relationships. While the effect of people’s so-called “implicit beliefs” have been studied in other aspects of human relationships, this is the first time they have been applied to the sexual domain. Maxwell says there is a honeymoon phase lasting about two to three years where sexual satisfaction is high among both sexual growth and sexual destiny believers. But the benefit of believing in sexual growth becomes apparent after this initial phase, as sexual desire begins to ebb and flow. “We know that disagreements in the sexual domain are somewhat inevitable over time,” says Maxwell. “Your sex life is like a garden, and it needs to be watered and nurtured to maintain it.” While her research did not focus on the influence of media on sex beliefs, it is clear pop culture has conditioned us to accept and understand that other aspects of relationships, such as the division of household chores, takes work and effort, Maxwell notes. Hollywood’s glamorous portrayal of sex and romance in shows like The Bachelor are less grounded in reality, however, which may fuel a “soulmate” philosophy that is not as adaptable to conflicts and problems that arise over time. Maxwell says her research provided at least one example of the media’s impact on the sexual domain. She was able to influence people’s beliefs by “priming” them with phoney magazine articles that either emphasized sexual destiny philosophies, or advocated the idea that sex takes work. Like everything else concerning human relationships, however, the study suggests the distinctions between the two schools of belief are more shades of grey than black and white. For example, the research demonstrated there are often aspects of both sexual growth and sexual destiny beliefs in the same individual. And while many women are avid consumers of soulmate and romantic destiny stories, the study showed they are more likely than men to believe that sex takes work in a long-term relationship. “I think that this could be because there is some evidence that sexual satisfaction takes more work for women, so they rate higher on the sexual growth scale,” Maxwell says The study showed that, while sexual-growth beliefs can buffer the impact of problems in the bedroom, they don’t help as much if the problems become too substantial. There is also some evidence that sexual-destiny believers may be open to making changes in their sex life for the sake of their partners, but only if they are convinced they are their true soulmate. The findings underscore the importance for counsellors and clinicians trying to help couples struggling with sexual satisfaction to promote the idea that problems in the bedroom are normal, and don’t mean the relationship is automatically in trouble. “Sexual-destiny beliefs have a lot of similarities with other dysfunctional beliefs about sex, and I think it’s important to recognize and address that.” The findings are reported in the study titled “How Implicit Theories of Sexuality Shape Sexual and Relationship Well-Being” published online ahead of print in the November issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. - 30 - MEDIA CONTACTS: Jessica Maxwell Department of Psychology University of Toronto jessica.maxwell@mail.utoronto.ca 1-647-524-1842 Sean Bettam Communications, Faculty of Arts & Science University of Toronto s.bettam@utoronto.ca 1-416-946-7950 Nick Seliwoniuk Media Relations Officer University of Toronto nick.seliwoniuk@utoronto.ca 1-416-946-5025  

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – In a statement issued on Friday, October 28, professor Ira Jacobs, dean of the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education at the University of Toronto, announced the appointment of Beth Ali to the position of executive director of co-curricular athletics and physical activity programs at KPE. Reporting to the dean of KPE, the executive director provides overall leadership and strategic direction to KPE’s co-curricular programmes, activities and services at the St. George campus, the U of T Varsity Blues programmes that involve students from all three U of T campuses, and related tri-campus initiatives. “I am very happy and excited to announce the appointment of Beth Ali to the position of executive director of co-curricular athletics and physical activity programs at KPE,” said Professor Jacobs. “Through both her personal and professional experience, Beth has demonstrated exemplary advocacy for sport development and the benefits of sport and physical activity in the development of the whole person, especially the positive impact it has on a student’s university experience. “Her experience, skills, and knowledge, combined with her passion for the University of Toronto, made her a natural and overwhelming choice to lead our co-curricular athletics and physical activity programs. We are very fortunate that she has agreed to assume that leadership role.” A passionate “true Blue”, Ali was the director of intercollegiate and high performance sports at the University of Toronto from 2010-15. She is an active and highly respected leader within the Ontario University Athletics and national USports (formerly CIS) organizations. A former student athlete and national, provincial and university field hockey coach, she has held prominent leadership positions in that sport both nationally and internationally. She has also been chef de mission for Canadian teams at major international sporting events such as the FISU Games. “I am honoured to have been appointed to this exciting position at the University of Toronto,” said Ali. “I am passionate about providing outstanding athletic and physical activity programs, services and facilities to all U of T students which enhance their university experience, build a sense of belonging and community, and contribute to their overall well-being now and in the future. I believe athletics and physical activity is a catalyst for campus spirit and institutional pride and contributes to the incomparable reputation of U of T. I look forward to continuing our partnerships with all student life staff and organizations to provide outstanding programs and services to our U of T community.” Ali brings to her new position many years of university co-curricular senior leadership excellence at three different universities (U of T, Ryerson and University of Waterloo) and across the continuum of programming that includes inter-university and high performance sports, intramural sports, open recreation, children and youth, strength and conditioning.  She was a key member of major sports infrastructure project planning committees that included the Mattamy Centre (former Maple Leaf Gardens) at Ryerson University, and the Back Campus Fields revitalization project and the Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport project at the University of Toronto. Ali’s appointment takes effect on November 1st, 2016. -30- For more information: Sarah Baker Director, PR & Communications Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education Office: 416-978-1663 sarah.e.baker@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals hidden keyword blacklists that are used to censor chats on three popular Chinese live streaming applications, YY, 9158, and Sina Show. Contrary to  prior research and assumptions that Internet censorship in China operates under a uniform set of guidelines, the researchers found uneven implementation of censorship on the live streaming  apps they studied. Live streaming applications have gained huge popularity in China in recent years, with millions of  users flocking to them to share karaoke performances, game sessions, and glimpses of their everyday  lives. Popular streams attract hundreds of thousands of users who can chat with the live streamers and purchase virtual items to give them. The live streamers can in turn trade those items for cash.  These platforms have given rise to a new generation of Internet celebrities who amass audiences,  virtual gifts, product endorsements, and even venture capital investment from their video streams.  However, the growing popularity of these apps has been met with increased pressure from the Chinese  government to ensure real name registration of live streaming performers and censorship of  prohibited content. “Social media companies in China are held responsible and liable for content on their platforms,  and are expected to control content, or face punishment from the government. Our research shows how  this system works in practice.” says Masashi Crete-Nishihata, (Research Manager, Citizen Lab). To examine how censorship works on these applications, Citizen Lab researchers reverse engineered them -- a careful process whereby the software is essentially taken apart and examined  from the inside out. They found that censorship is done on the client-side, meaning all the rules  to perform censorship are inside of the application running on your phone or computer. The  researchers were able to collect the keyword lists used to trigger censorship of chat messages. Jeffrey Knockel (Senior Researcher, Citizen Lab) explains: “These apps have built-in lists of  blacklisted keywords. If you send any of these keywords your chat message is censored. These keyword lists give a behind the scenes look into how social media is censored in China.” The researchers tracked updates to the keyword lists over a year and found that new terms were  often added in reaction to sensitive events. Overall, they found limited overlap in the blacklisted keywords used by the companies. These findings suggest that while the Chinese government may set general expectations about taboo topics, decisions on what exactly to censor are left primarily to companies themselves. China has the most Internet users in the world and one of the strictest regimes of information control. This new report offers a nuanced and in depth view of how social media is censored in this country. “Many people believe China censors the Internet in a uniform, monolithic manner. Our research shows that the social media ecosystem in China -- though definitely restricted for users -- is more decentralized, variable, and slightly chaotic.” says Ron Deibert, (Director of the Citizen Lab). The researchers are releasing their report with a timeline that visualizes events censored by these applications over the past year. This report is part of the Net Alert project, an effort to make research on information controls more accessible. The Citizen Lab , based at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, has extensive experience uncovering Internet censorship practices through network measurement and reverse engineering techniques. Read the Full Report: https://netalert.me/harmonized-histories.html -30- For media inquiries, contact: Dena Allen Public Affairs & Engagement Munk School of Global Affairs University of Toronto Telephone: 416.946.0123 Mobile: 416.795.3902 dena.allen@utoronto.ca Guide on Citing in Media Title: Harmonized Histories? A year of fragmented censorship across Chinese live streaming  applications Published By: The Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto, https://netalert.me/harmonized-histories.html Publication Date: 1 November 2016

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

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Media Hotline
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Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

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U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.

Toronto, ON – A new director has been appointed as director of the India Innovation Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management. The Institute is a hub for researchers across the university and around the world that aims to bring together faculty and students who are interested in how India is using innovation to transform itself across a variety of spheres, including innovation in technology, manufacturing, services, processes and government. Partha Mohanram, a professor of accounting and the CPA Ontario Professor of Financial Accounting at the Rotman School, is the new director of the Institute, a role he assumed earlier this year. “I see Innovation as a two-way street,” says Professor Mohanram. “There is a lot that India can learn from the west and developing economies as it tries to modernize itself, lift millions out of poverty and manage growth while dealing with the problems of climate change. However, there is also a lot that the rest of world can learn from India. For instance, the ongoing success of the AADHAAR universal identification program shows how one can use technology to ensure that social services and government programs reach those they are intended for. Similarly, breakthroughs like the Nano car or the Mitti Cool refrigerator demonstrates how one can innovate frugally.” The institute plans to be a clearinghouse for ideas broadly related to Innovation and India. Professor Mohanram obtained his PhD in Business Economics from Harvard. Prior to that, he obtained his PGDM (MBA) from IIM-Ahmedabad, and a B.Tech in Computer Science from IIT-Madras. He has published extensively in the top accounting and management journals, with publications in The Accounting Review, Review of Accounting Studies, Journal of Accounting Research, Journal of Accounting and Economics, Contemporary Accounting Research and Management Science. He is considered to be one of the leading experts in the area of valuation, with many papers on fundamental analysis and the measurement of implied cost of capital. His papers are highly cited and featured in the business press. The Institute held events earlier this month with Hon. Arun Jaitley, Finance Minister of India and Professor Arun Sundararajan of New York University’s Stern School of Business. Further information on the Institute is online at www.rotman.utoronto.ca/FacultyAndResearch/ResearchCentres/IndiaInnovation. The Rotman School of Management is located in the heart of Canada’s commercial and cultural capital and is part of the University of Toronto, one of the world’s top 20 research universities. The Rotman School fosters a new way to think that enables our graduates to tackle today’s global business and societal challenges.  For more information, visit www.rotman.utoronto.ca. -30- For more information: Ken McGuffin Manager, Media Relations Rotman School of Management University of Toronto Tel: 416.946.3818 E-mail: mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca Follow Rotman on Twitter @rotmanschool Watch Rotman on You Tube www.youtube.com/rotmanschool

Latest Media Releases

December 6, 2016

Bell Canada, Canada Soccer and Toronto FC partner with U of T Varsity Blues to present Canada’s largest soccer coaching conference

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the Varsity Blues are pleased to announce three major partnerships for the sixth annual National Soccer Coaching Conference, including presenting sponsor, Bell. Toronto FC and the Canadian Soccer Association will also be partnering with the conference this year, taking place January 27 – 29, 2017 at Varsity Centre. Their respective partnerships mark a commitment to supporting the development of our youth, ensuring only the highest quality of coaching excellence is present during the…

December 5, 2016

The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies and appoints inaugural director

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto has launched The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies on its St. George campus. An endowment—originally from Tung Lin Kok Yuen, the Hong-Kong based charitable organization established by Mr. Robert H. N. Ho’s grandmother, Lady Clara Ho Tung—will provide an intellectual home for the largest contingent of Buddhist studies experts in Canada. “Our esteemed colleagues at The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation have demonstrated tremendous global leadership in their…

December 5, 2016

Children with average and lower vocabularies reading e-books learn more with an adult reader than pre-recorded voice

Toronto, ON – A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows that four-year-olds with average and lower vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an eBook to them versus relying solely on the eBook’s voiceover. Adult reader versus e-book voiceover In the study, four-year-olds either interacted with a digital book on their own using the book’s voiceover, or an adult read them the same book. The book was teaching…

December 2, 2016

25 top University of Toronto scholars named Canada Research Chairs

Toronto, ON – Two researchers who are leading efforts to transform the Canadian social work landscape for children and youth are among 25 new Canada Research Chairs awarded today to the University of Toronto. Worth a total of $19.7 million, the positions were announced by federal Science Minister Kirsty Duncan at a national news conference held at U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The government is also providing $1.4 million in infrastructure funding to support the chairs. Meet U…

December 1, 2016

Researchers Expose Censorship on Popular Chat App, WeChat

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab are publishing a report today that reveals how WeChat (the most popular chat app in China) censors content. The results show WeChat has separate censorship policies for users in China and internationally, with the majority of censorship targeted for China accounts, and has removed notifications to users about the blocking of chat messages on the platform. The researchers also found that there is more censorship in “group chat” messages…

December 1, 2016

Post-merger layoffs moderated, corporate takeovers cut when labour protections strengthened, Rotman research finds

Toronto, ON – An examination of takeover activity in OECD countries has found that increased job protections have a major impact on corporate mergers and acquisitions, driving down activity while cutting the synergy gains associated with it. The effect is so significant that researchers have concluded that the potential for labour restructuring is one of the key reason behind takeover bids. The study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management found an almost 15 per cent drop in…

November 23, 2016

The time is ripe for the City of Toronto to implement taxes, says IMFG

Toronto, ON – As cities like Toronto face tough decisions about how to fund the complex and growing demands on local government, a newly released paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs argues that additional taxes are entirely appropriate and necessary for Canada’s major cities to continue to thrive. In the IMFG Perspectives Paper (No. 15) released today, New Tax Sources for Canada’s Largest Cities: What Are the…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC News | December 7, 2016

Is there a 'Trump effect' with Syrian refugees in Canada?

Social justice education professor Megan Boler, shares her view on whether we are seeing the so-called "Trump effect" starting to appear in Canada. Read more.

TVO The Agenda | December 6, 2016

The Future of Medicine

U of T's Molly Shoichet talks about the future of medicine and her research. She holds the Canada Research Chair in tissue engineering and is a professor of chemistry, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Watch here. 

Times Higher Education | December 6, 2016

Scholars advised on dealing with the aftermath of US election

Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto discussed her notion of Anti-Authoritarian Academic Code of Conduct. Read more.