Toronto, ON – Marshall McLuhan is the most influential thinker in Canada known globally for predicting social media, the Internet, crowd-sourced news, and reality television. At the height of his fame in the mid-60s, he hobnobbed with John Lennon, Pierre Trudeau, Norman Mailer, Woody Allen, and Barbara Walters. A Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar who worked at the intersection of culture and technology—he is credited with building the foundation for our obsession with digital media. His Centre of Culture and Technology, located within a small coach house on the U of T campus, acted as a clubhouse where he mulled over ideas and created questions probing how people communicated. So why is Prof. McLuhan’s work relevant now, 36 years after this death? Because we are still producing intellectual giants at the University Toronto. “Marshall McLuhan and his Toronto School colleagues helped accentuate U of T’s position as a global centre for creativity and leadership in the humanities,” said Meric Gertler, president of the University of Toronto. “He remains a key figure in communication and media studies, and the work of the McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology is vital in engaging local and international partners in exploring the implications of his theories for the 21st century.” For a forty year period until the 1970s, McLuhan was part of a remarkable intellectual climate within and around the University of Toronto when scholars Harold Innis, Eric Havelock, Glenn Gould, and Northrop Frye made up the so-called Toronto School of Communication. Their theories were instrumental in drawing worldwide attention to the idea that technological engagement plays a fundamental role in the structuring of human perception and culture. The University is still building on the foundation of McLuhan’s work conducted in his modest “Coach House,” where he spent much of his 30-year career at U of T, now affiliated with the Faculty of Information. “The Centre for Culture and Technology is an intellectual cabin in a forest of city skyscrapers where Herbert Marshall McLuhan engaged the public in probing the interrelationship of technology and culture and their effects on perception and social order,” says David Nostbakken, a McLuhan former student and teaching assistant of McLuhan’s, currently the McLuhan Centre strategist. The Centre, first established on October 24, 1963, in the heart of St. Michaels’ campus, was where McLuhan conducted Monday Night Seminars, classes, and art exhibitions, bringing together scholars and researchers from all branches of science and humanities in discourse with the city and the global village. The present day McLuhan Centre wants to recapture the global imagination of his communications theories. The resurgence started with the famous McLuhan “Monday Night Seminars” last year, where each week three special guests interact with a McLuhan Fellow moderator, and engage the assembled attendees from the university, the city, and from around the world .“City as Classroom” has been the broad theme, with the goal to engage academics, the city, business, industry, civil society, the arts, and public and private interest. The Centre will further reconnect McLuhan to the City of Toronto, and build a larger global village, starting with the Heritage Board recognizing the Coach House’s place in history through a plaque unveiling on October 12. For three days after, a global conference, Toronto School, Then Now, Next, will explore the value of leading Canadian thinkers and others, contemporaries that inspired the world. “The goal is to explore how we inform innovative thinking and intellectual provocation in Toronto, and secure Canada's place in forward-thinking and technological reconfigurations of culture,” says Prof. Seamus Ross, Interim Director of the McLuhan Centre. “The conference will foster the making of an intellectual community that serves as a source of knowledgeable energy and encouragement for future research connections around the legacy of the Toronto School,” says Paolo Granata, McLuhan Centenary Fellow and Conference Chair. Speakers include John Ralston Saul (Canada’s leading public intellectual), Mark Kingwell (Philosophy Professor), Joshua Meyrowitz (media theorist), Sara Diamond (President OCAD University), Arthur Kroker (public intellectual), Eric McLuhan (internationally known lecturer), and Gail Lord (Lord Cultural Resources). EVENTS PLANNED (for a full event listing, please see http://thetorontoschool.ca)
  • Wednesday, October 12, 12:00-1:00 pm, Toronto Heritage Plaque Unveiling (McLuhan Centre) with Kristyn Wong-Tam, City Councillor and Prof. Meric Gertler, President, University of Toronto, among other speakers
  • Thursday, October 13, 5:30-7 pm, Lectio Magistralis by Paul Elie on “Glenn Gould and Marshall McLuhan” and opening of a Multi-Media Exhibition “McLuhan on Campus: Local Inspirations, Global Visions" (St. Michael's College)
  • Friday, October 14, 9-9:30 am, opening ceremony The Toronto School: Then, Now, Next International Conference (Victoria College Building).
  • Sunday, October 16, 5:30-6:30 pm, Town Hall Meeting “Rethinking the Global Village in an era of Cities and Soft Power” at the Then, Now, Next International Conference (Isabel Bader Theatre).
- 30 - Media Contact: Kathleen O’Brien, Faculty of Information, U of T, 416.978.7184 or kathleen.obrien@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – Technology. Porn. Networks. Intimacy. These words litter the bookshelves of Faculty of Information Assistant Professor Patrick Keilty, who has already made publishing history within the field of information studies —twice. Prof. Keilty, whose research focuses on how technology intersects with feminist and queer issues, recently made history when he co-edited the August 2016 issue of Library Trends, “Reconfiguring Race, Gender, and Sexuality”—the first Library and Information Science (LIS) journal dedicated entirely to race, gender, or sexuality. This issue was based on the Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium  held at the iSchool in October 2014, which brought together more than 100 scholars, activists, and practitioners to discuss issues of race, gender, and sexuality in libraries and archives. In addition to this achievement, Prof. Keilty also broke new ground with his co-edited collection, Feminist and Queer Information Studies Reader (Litwin Books, 2013), the first feminist and/or queer reader within the field of information studies. Now he and Professor Leslie Regan Shade are furthering their commitment to social justice by publishing a collection of essays, recorded talks, and new media art from the “Feminist & Queer Approaches to Technoscience” conference at the Faculty of Information in 2013-14. Released today, this is a special double issue called “Traversing Technologies,” in a highly respected webjournal, The Scholar & Feminist Online, published by the Barnard Center for Research on Women at Barnard College, Columbia University. Included in the online edition are seven articles and a dozen videos ranging from cyber-feminism, environmental politics, video and installation art, gender and video games, hacktivism, to surveillance technologies. “Technoscience connects the study of scientific and technology with the politics of its worldly consequences. Our special issue focuses on issues of gender, sexuality, race, and postcolonialism in order to offer alternative ways of understanding and creating technology,” he explains. To see this issue, please visit: http://sfonline.barnard.edu/traversing-technologies/ -30- To schedule a one-on-one interview with Professor Keilty, please contact: Kathleen O’Brien, Communications Officer, Faculty of Information, U of T 416.978.7184 or kathleen.obrien@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – Kevin Han, Jun Ran Xu, Haleema Khan and Sabrina Cruz have been named University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,500 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $80,000 each. Since inception, 220 students have received this celebrated scholarship. Kevin Han, 18, is a recipient of the $80,000 Schulich Leader Scholarship. A graduate of Dr. Frank J. Hayden Secondary School in Burlington, Ontario, Han will be entering the Faculty of the Applied Science and Engineering program this fall. Jun Ran Xu, 18, is a recipient of the $80,000 Schulich Leader Scholarship. A graduate of Aurora High School in Aurora, Ontario, Xu will be entering the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering program this fall. Haleema Khan, 18, is a recipient of the $60,000 Schulich Leader Scholarship. A graduate of Westlane Secondary School in Niagara Falls, Ontario, Khan will be entering the Life Sciences program at the Faculty of Arts and Science Victoria College this fall. She will be a Victoria College student. Sabrina Cruz, 18, is a recipient of the $60,000 Schulich Leader Scholarship. A graduate of Notre Dame Catholic Secondary School in Ajax, Ontario, Cruz will be entering the Math & Physical Science program at the Faculty of Arts and Sciences this fall. She will be an Innis College student. “It is very important that we support exceptional students that demonstrate great leadership and embrace STEM fields,” said Schulich. “It is an investment not only in their future, but the future of our country. Their pursuits are sure to lead to key innovations in the years ahead.” About Schulich Leader Scholarships Schulich Leader Scholarships are prestigious entrance scholarships awarded to high school graduates enrolling in a Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics (STEM) undergraduate program at participating universities in Canada and Israel. Recognizing the increasing importance and impact that STEM disciplines will have on the prosperity of future generations, businessman and philanthropist Seymour Schulich established this $100 million scholarship fund in 2011 to encourage our best and brightest students to be the next pioneers of global scientific research and innovation. This program awards 100 scholarships annually, valued at more than $5.5 million. Schulich Leaders can devote their full time and attention to their studies, as all of their financial needs are covered over the course of their degree. As a result, many of our highest potential students are winning these scholarships and will make great contributions to society. -30- For more information: www.schulichleaders.com For media inquiries contact: Farida Adam Student Awards Officer University Advancement Tel: 416-978-5701 farida.adam@utoronto.ca www.adm.utoronto.ca Or David Goodman dgoodman@schulichfoundation.org 647-289-1950 Dara Newton dnewton@uja.schulichleaders.com 416-480-6492

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – More than 1,400 students from Grades 3-8 will descend on the University of Toronto on Friday, May 13 for Innovate U, a massive day of hands-on activities celebrating science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) and the power of innovation. The one-day event is a first-of-its-kind partnership between U of T Engineering, Google Canada and Actua, Canada’s largest STEM outreach charity. Innovate U will engage youth in activities where they are engineering, building and inventing their own innovations and technology – from robotics and genetics to rollercoasters and video games. Students and teachers from 45 classes across the Greater Toronto Area will peek under the surface of today’s tech, including smartphones, 3D printers and solar cars, to understand how they work—all while experiencing the post-secondary environment in a fun and accessible way. “Engineers are the innovators, makers and creators solving the world’s greatest challenges, from writing code that controls rovers on Mars, to designing robots that perform surgery on your cells,” says Dawn Britton, director of outreach for U of T Engineering. “We want to show students that technology doesn’t just come in a box — anyone can learn the skills you need to make it work better, go faster, or even invent something totally new.” The day kicks off with a talk from innovator and young entrepreneur Ann Makosinski. Her first toy was a box of transistors, and she’s been creating ever since — in 2013 she won the global Google Science Fair for inventing the ‘Hollow Flashlight’, which uses the thermoelectric effect to convert radiant body heat into electricity, and in 2014 was named one of TIME’s 30 Under 30. Students will participate in a series of one-hour workshops exploring the basics of coding, playing with circuitry and learning about polymers by making slime. They will also have the chance to visit the Innovation Centre, featuring exhibits and demonstrations including a student-built Indy 500 race car, Google Cardboard, 3D Selfies, Code Created Music and more. "The aim behind Innovate U is to inspire Canada's next generation of technology builders," said Sam Sebastian, Managing Director of Google Canada. "Ninety-eight percent of Google engineers had some level of exposure to computer science and technology before entering university. Events like today will help Canadian children understand that computer science is not simply the language of ones and zeros. It's the language of creativity, entrepreneurship and Canada’s future potential." Actua CEO Jennifer Flanagan added, “Actua is happy to be supporting Innovate U. It not only prepares youth to be the STEM professionals of tomorrow but shows them they have the skills and capacity to innovate today.” About the University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering The University of Toronto’s Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering is the premier engineering school in Canada and among the best in the world. Through excellence in engineering education and research, we prepare the next generation of global engineering leaders and innovators to address the world’s most critical challenges. Through our outreach programs, more than 7,000 elementary and high school students of all backgrounds are inspired by science, technology, engineering and math each year. About Google Canada Google’s mission is to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful.  As a global technology leader, Google’s innovations in web search and advertising have made its website a top internet property and its brand one of the most recognized in the world. Google Canada has offices in Waterloo, Toronto, Montreal, and Ottawa with over 400 'Canooglers' working on teams across Engineering, Sales, Marketing, PR, Policy, and HR. Engineers at Google Canada work on many of company's core products including Chrome, Safe Browsing, and Gmail; while the Sales Teams assist Canadian businesses with their digital advertising strategies. About Actua Actua is Canada’s leading science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) youth outreach network representing 33 university and college based members. Over 3 million young Canadians have been inspired through their participation in Actua’s hands on educational workshops, camps and community outreach initiatives. Each year, Actua’s growing network of member organizations reach over 250,000 young Canadians in over 500 communities nationwide. At the national level Actua focuses on the engagement of underrepresented audiences through specialized programs for Indigenous youth, girls and young women, at-risk youth and youth living in Northern and remote communities. Actua’s major funders include: Google Canada, Suncor Energy Foundation, GE Canada and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. For more information about Actua, visit actua.ca. -30- For more information: U of T Media Relations 416-978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

Nanovista is one of the first 22 up-and-coming companies selected to be part of JLABS @ Toronto, an innovative research centre designed to advance bio/pharmaceutical, medical device, consumer and digital health programs. “Being a part of JLABS brings us one step closer to commercializing and delivering this product to market to help patients,” said Jinzi Zheng of her company’s injectable imaging agent that helps surgeons see where tumours are located and remove them more precisely, while leaving healthy tissue intact. “They’ll give us the right exposure to the business side and they’ll help us carve out a clear path to market. We’re scientists, we don’t have that expertise.” Of the 22 startups at JLABS announced today, at least eight have ties to the University of Toronto and its partner hospitals — like Nanovista, which developed out of research started by Zheng as she worked towards her PhD in medical biophysics. The others include: 6Biotech, App4Independence, AvroBio, DNAstack, Ketogen Pharma, Ubiquitech and Proteorex Therapeutics Inc., which is working closely with Professor Robert Batey, chair of the department of chemistry. Their new home is a gleaming 40,000-square foot facility that has cutting-edge, modular and scalable lab space, equipment and, most importantly, access to scientific, industry and capital funding experts. It also features JLABS’ first device and digital prototype lab, which was shown off today at its official opening to dignitaries such as Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, Toronto Mayor John Tory and U of T president Meric Gertler. The space, which is rented by JLABS from the University of Toronto, is the result of a unique collaboration between global giant Johnson & Johnson Innovation LLC, the university, the Government of Ontario, Janssen Inc., MaRS Innovation and several hospital partners. “The project to transform and fit out the floor into the first Canadian location for JLABS, budgeted at $18.3 million, came in on time and more than a million dollars under budget,” said Scott Mabury, U of T’s vice-president of operations.” Every speaker at the event mentioned the university and the critical role it played in making JLABS @ Toronto a reality, including Premier Wynne.   [caption id="attachment_14895" align="alignnone" width="640"] Premier Kathleen Wynne, Mayor John Tory, Ontario cabinet minister Reza Moridi and U of T president Meric Gertler were on hand for the official opening of JLABS @ Toronto (all photos by Johnny Guatto)[/caption]   “The opportunities that JLABS will create for Ontario are immense,” she said. “And while the driving force behind those successes will be the people who take their research from lab to market, we need to recognize that there are other factors. “If it weren’t for MaRS, if it weren’t for U of T, the strategic partnership stream of our Jobs and Prosperity Fund, the life sciences corridor that surrounds us today, and the whole innovation ecosystem that we’ve built here in Ontario, there would be no JLABs launch today.” With five locations in the United States, coming to Toronto next made sense. “Canada’s startup scene is booming,” explained Melinda Richter, head of JLABS. The location is also perfect — smack dab in the centre of Toronto’s bustling ecosystem of hospitals, businesses and university labs that already attract more than $1.4-billion in research funding each year to the city. The university’s Banting and Best Centre for Innovation & Entrepreneurship is also just across the street making this stretch of College Street the place to be for ambitious researchers to hang out their shingle with the hope of turning their discovery into the next big thing. “We’re excited to have JLABS @ Toronto join the University of Toronto as the newest addition to our vibrant entrepreneurship ecosystem,” said Gertler. “Together with our nine campus-led accelerators, under the umbrella of our Banting & Best Centre for Innovation & Entrepreneurship, we’re fuelling the creation of new companies, new jobs and solutions to some of the world’s most pressing challenges.” [caption id="attachment_14897" align="alignnone" width="750"] U of T president Meric Gertler at the official opening of JLABS @ Toronto (all photos by Johnny Guatto)[/caption]   For Zheng and her Nanovista co-founders, Christine Allen and David Jaffray, a world of possibilities has now opened up by joining the JLABS family. This in addition to their academic positions at U of T where Zheng is an assistant professor in the Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering and a scientist in the Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health with the University Health Network; Allen is a professor in the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy and GSK Chair in Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery; and Jaffray is a professor, director of TECHNA and executive vice-president of technology and innovation at UHN. “It’s going to be great to be able to bounce ideas around with the other startups,” Zheng said. “They’re going to have some of the same challenges as us, which means we can learn from each other. They’ll be a healthy competition.” And aside from dreams of having operating rooms around the world stocked with vials of their product, Zheng says ideally they’d like their time at JLABS to lead to them meeting the right people who can take over the business side of their company, freeing them to focus on what they know best — pushing the science forward. -30- For more information: U of T Media Relations 416-978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

Toronto, ON - A new study from the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab identifies security and privacy issues in QQ Browser, a mobile browser produced by China-based Internet giant Tencent, which may put many millions of users of the application at risk of serious compromise. Citizen Lab researchers identified problems in both the Android and Windows versions of the application. The Android version of the browser transmits personally identifiable data, including a user’s search terms, the URLs of visited websites, nearby WiFi access points, and the user’s IMSI and IMEI identifiers, without encryption or with easily decrypted encryption. Similarly, the Windows version sends personally identifiable data, including the URL of all pages visited in the browser, a user’s hard drive serial number, MAC address, Windows hostname, and Windows user security identifier, also without encryption or with easily decrypted decryption. The transmission of personally identifiable user data without properly implemented encryption leaves this data vulnerable to surveillance by a number of intermediaries, including a user’s ISP, wireless network operator, mobile carrier, a malicious actor with network visibility, and/or a government agency with access to any of those intermediaries. “QQ Browser phones home information on your device’s hardware serial numbers and tracks your location and every page you visit. Even the person you trust most does not have access to this amount of information on you and yet QQ receives it from everyone who uses their browser,” said Jeffrey Knockel, Senior Researcher at the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs In addition, both the Windows and Android versions of the application did not adequately protect the software update process, which leaves the application vulnerable to the execution of arbitrary code. This means that a user could be deceived by a malicious actor into installing malware without their knowledge during the QQ Browser update process. Citizen Lab researchers disclosed these vulnerabilities to Tencent on February 5, 2016. Tencent security engineers acknowledged these security concerns and released updated versions of both the Windows and Android versions of the application in March 2016.  Analysis by Citizen Lab researchers showed that some of the problems identified were resolved, while others remain. The Citizen Lab’s Director, Ron Deibert, also sent questions to Tencent seeking comment on the reasons for the vulnerabilities and data collection issues, specifically requesting comment on whether the company is following state directives. China maintains one of the world’s most extensive censorship and surveillance regimes and all companies are required by law to follow state regulations. China’s anti-terrorism law, which came into effect on January 1, 2016, includes requirements for telecommunications operators and Internet service providers to “provide technical interfaces, decryption, and other technical support assistance to public security organs and state security organs conducting prevention and investigation of terrorist activities in accordance with law”. As of the date of publication, however, Tencent has not replied to the Citizen Lab letter. “Most users would likely be surprised to discover the extent of personally identifiable data that the application is collecting, and would likely be troubled to find it is being transmitted in an insecure manner. If developers are going to be collecting this data, it is imperative that they use widely-accepted methods of transmitting the data in a more secure way,” said Adam Senft, Researcher at the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs. This is the third web browser produced by a China-based company that Citizen Lab researchers have identified security issues with. In May 2015, Citizen Lab research identified similar security concerns with UC Browser, a popular mobile web browser owned by China-based e-commerce giant Alibaba. In February 2016, Citizen Lab published a report describing similar security concerns with Baidu Browser, a web browser produced by China-based Baidu. “The collection of such sensitive information about a user, and its insecure transmission across networks, is disturbing regardless of where it takes place. But the fact that this is being undertaken in a context like China -- where there is extensive surveillance, companies are required by law to share user data with authorities on demand, and dissidents are routinely incarcerated for opposition to the government -- is a serious matter of personal security and human rights,” said Ron Deibert, Director of the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs. -30- For media inquiries, contact: Dena Allen Public Affairs & Engagement Munk School of Global Affairs University of Toronto Tel: 416-946-0123 Mob: 416-795-3902 dena.allen@utoronto.ca Guide on Citing in Media Title: WUP! There It Is: Privacy and Security Issues in QQ Browser Published By: The Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto Publication Date: 28 March 2016 Report URL: https://citizenlab.org/2016/03/privacy-security-issues-qq-browser/

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

Toronto, ON — University of Toronto researcher Rachel Harding will be the first known biomedical researcher to welcome the world to review her lab notes in real time. The post-doctoral fellow with U of T’s Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) is also explaining her findings to the general public through her blog. She hopes her open approach will accelerate research into Huntington’s disease. “This should drive the process faster than working alone,” Harding says. “By sharing my notes, I hope that other scientists will critique my work, collaborate and share data in the early stages of research.” Her research at SGC is funded by CHDI Foundation, a non-profit drug-development organization exclusively dedicated to Huntington’s disease. Both organizations aim to accelerate research by making it open and collaborative. Her approach is intended to leverage the experience of a community of scientists. Individual researchers often still work in relative isolation and then publish only their positive discoveries, usually years after the experiments were actually done. Thus, scientists often pursue similar ideas in parallel and miss many opportunities to learn from each other’s mistakes. She has started by publishing raw data and play-by-play details of her first effort on the CERN open digital repository Zenodo. She also posts regular updates on her blog Lab Scribbles, where she includes an experimental summary written in lay terms. Harding hopes this will speed up research into Huntington’s disease, which despite decades of effort researchers have yet to uncover the mechanisms behind the neurodegenerative disorder. It’s known that a mutation in the huntingtin gene leads to progressive cognitive decline and physical deterioration, usually beginning between the ages of 35 and 50. But, the exact structure of the huntingtin protein encoded by this gene remains a mystery. Understanding what the protein looks like will give insight into how it causes disease and potentially reveal ways of reducing its harm. “This is a very large protein and difficult to study. It is significantly larger than most other proteins in the cell,” says Harding. It also has an especially complicated structure with few similarities to other known proteins, which makes learning by comparison more difficult. Considering the challenges and the high stakes, Harding will take all the help she can get. She hopes that by opening her notebook to the research community, she will open new channels of communication and collaboration. She also invites people who aren’t necessarily scientists, including patient communities, to get involved in the process. “This is what research is really like,” says Harding. “It’s not so much about big breakthroughs and polished results, but about incrementally getting closer to an answer. I think by being more open about our research we can all learn how to do the experiments better.” This same community-based philosophy underlies CHDI’s drive to be a “collaborative enabler,” bringing scientists from diverse disciplines together and sharing resources and expertise to advance Huntington’s disease research. It’s also why the SGC provides open access to an array of data and reagents – from chemical probes that enable drug discovery in cancer research to raw data on huntingtin. “By providing access to raw data as well as the enabling research tools, we will help the community perform more robust experiments, which will accelerate the drug discovery process and potentially the development of new medicines,” says Aled Edwards, a Professor in the University of Toronto’s Department of Medical Biophysics and Director and CEO of the SGC. Harding announced she was opening her lab notes to the public at CHDI’s 11th Annual HD Therapeutics Conference, which was held this week. -30- For more information or to arrange interviews please contact: Heidi Singer Office of Communications U of T Medicine Tel: 416.978.5811 heidi.singer@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

Toronto, ON - The University of Toronto welcomes the $15M investment by the Ontario government for the new Centre for Engineering Innovation and Entrepreneurship (CEIE). As stated in the 2016 Ontario Budget introduced today, this investment will support strengthening the Innovation SuperCorridor in Ontario. This Centre will bring together smart building design and state-of-the-art learning technologies, enabling students, faculty, alumni and industry partners to work together in addressing some of Canada's most pressing economic challenges. "We are pleased at this recognition of the University of Toronto's excellence and contribution to the economy through innovation, entrepreneurship and work-integrated learning," said U of T President Professor Meric Gertler.  "With the province's support to develop the Centre for Engineering Innovation and Entrepreneurship, we will be able to accelerate our efforts in these key areas.” The University has raised almost $26 million in donations to support the CEIE including one million dollars from students through the U of T Engineering Society. Designed to support and accelerate economic growth and long-term prosperity in Ontario and Canada, the CEIE will: Help enhance Ontario’s private sector productivity and competitiveness:
  • Modernize the province’s manufacturing sector by generating innovations in robotics and advanced manufacturing;
  • Accelerate entrepreneurship activity leading to the creation of more technology-based start-ups; and,
  • Produce highly qualified graduates in fields of study that are key to Ontario’s and Canada’s economic success.
President Gertler also welcomed continued modernization of the Ontario financial aid system. These changes will help students with the greatest need get better access to grants upfront and increase the amount of financial support. -30- For more information, contact: U of T Media Relations 416-978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca    

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

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General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

Toronto, ON - A new report from the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab reveals that Baidu Browser, a popular mobile browser based in China and used by millions of people, has many privacy and security issues that could put users’ communications at risk. Baidu Browser is available in both an Android and Windows version, and the researchers found both contain several problems. The Android version transmits data such as a user’s search terms, GPS coordinates, and URLs visited in the browser to Baidu servers without encryption. Other data are sent with easily decryptable encryption. Similarly, the Windows version of the app transmits a user’s search terms, hard drive serial number, wireless MAC address, URL and title of visited web pages and CPU model number without encryption or with easily decryptable encryption. The researchers' analysis also shows that many of the leaks of sensitive information are the result of an analytics software development kit (SDK) that the researchers identified being used in hundreds of additional applications developed by both Baidu and third parties in the Google Play Store and thousands in one popular Chinese app store, affecting potentially millions of other uses in a kind of "collateral exposure." The unencrypted and poorly encrypted transmission of this information places sensitive user data at risk of being exposed to surveillance by a number of intermediaries, including a user’s ISP, wireless network operator, mobile carrier or a malicious actor with network visibility. In addition, neither the Windows nor Android versions of the application protected software updates with code signatures, meaning that a malicious actor could cause the application to download and run arbitrary code. This vulnerability could potentially lead to malicious code being installed on a user’s device without their knowledge. The Citizen Lab, an interdisciplinary research group at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto, has an ongoing research project on the privacy and security of popular mobile applications used in Asia. In May 2015, Citizen Lab research identified similar security concerns with UC Browser, a popular mobile web browser owned by China-based e-commerce giant Alibaba. “When you're using the browser, Baidu and anyone monitoring your traffic can use your hardware’s serial numbers to track your GPS location, nearby wireless networks, and every unencrypted and encrypted web page you visit,” says Jeffrey Knockel, Senior Researcher at the Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto. “Even if you're not using their browser, third-party apps using their analytics SDK have similar leaks. Most users would have no way of knowing their personal data was being transmitted this way and would be unable to prevent it. The extent of these issues and the ease with which they were found suggests that security researchers need to better engage with software companies in foreign markets.” Citizen Lab researchers notified Baidu of these security issues in November 2015 and Baidu released updates in February 2016. Analysis shows that while some of the issues have been remedied in the updated versions, many of the security issues identified remain unresolved. “The digital ecosystem that surrounds us and to which we entrust our thoughts, habits, and movements is built upon a constantly shifting, often insecure, and yet highly interconnected foundation of millions of devices and applications,” says Ron Deibert, Director of the Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. “Our analysis of Baidu Browser shows precisely why lifting the lid on this ecosystem is not only important for the protection of users’ privacy and security, it should be seen as an urgent civic imperative.” -30- For media inquiries, contact: Dena Allen Public Affairs & Engagement Munk School of Global Affairs University of Toronto Telephone: 416-946-0123 Mobile: 416-795-3902 dena.allen@utoronto.ca Guide on Citing in Media Title: Baidu’s and Don’ts: Privacy and Security Issues in Baidu Browser Published By: The Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto Publication Date: 22 February 2016 Report URL: https://citizenlab.org/2016/02/privacy-security-issues-baidu-browser

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – A new study released by the Impact Centre at the University of Toronto has shown that Canadians lag behind their American counterparts in their attitudes toward innovation. “The Impact Centre is undertaking research to understand why we lag much of the developed world in our capacity to innovate,” said study author and Impact Centre Senior Fellow Charles Plant. “Most studies only say that we are bad at innovating, and include general recommendations about what we can do about it,” said Plant. “They don’t say why we fail at innovation and how to fix the problem.” Major findings:
  • Americans have a greater willingness to take risks.
  • Canadians shy away from independence.
  • Canadians are less concerned with earning a lot of money.
  • Canadians lack grit and perseverance when compared with Americans.
  • Americans are more driven to innovate.
The study found that 29 per cent more Americans than Canadians have a strongly positive attitude towards innovation. Americans also outscore Canadians on almost every dimension of attitude towards innovation. The study is based on a survey of 1,000 adult knowledge workers, including managers and employees. Read the full 13-page report: http://www.impactcentre.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/160208-Thinking-Inside-the-Box.pdf -30- About The Impact Centre at The University of Toronto The Impact Centre strives to bring science to society. We believe that science is the foundation for a better quality of life. Research, invention, and innovation are considered among the key contributors to economic development and sustainability of communities in Canada and around the world. Our vision is to be a place where you can connect with exceptional research, talent, innovative companies, and government to create products and services that benefit society. Media Contact: Charles Plant Senior Fellow Impact Centre Cell: 416-458-4850 cplant@imc.utoronto.ca @cplant Personal website: http://www.materialminds.com Impact Centre: www.impactcentre.ca  

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

Toronto, ON - Today, researchers announce the release of a new report describing major security and privacy issues in several leading wearable fitness tracking devices and accompanying mobile applications. The research examined offerings by Apple, Basis, Fitbit, Garmin, Jawbone, Mio, Withings, and Xiaomi. The report, Every Step You Fake: A Comparative Analysis of Fitness Tracker Privacy and Security, finds that all studied fitness wearables except for the Apple Watch wirelessly emit a persistent unique identifier over Bluetooth. This leakage lets third parties, such as shopping centres or others interested in location-based monitoring, collect and map out people’s movements over time. The research also found that two tracking applications exhibit vulnerabilities enabling third parties to access user data, while two other applications are susceptible to users falsifying their own activity levels. The research involved analyzing data transmissions between fitness tracker mobile phone applications and the Internet, reverse engineering mobile applications, and examining Bluetooth metadata transmissions. The report is a collaborative effort between Open Effect, a non-profit applied research group focusing on digital privacy and security, and the Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto. Open Effect has previously published research on the security of ad tracking cookies, and developed Access My Info, an application that makes it easy for Canadians to file legal requests for access to their personal information. “Most devices we studied do not implement Bluetooth privacy and this leaves users vulnerable to location-based surveillance. We hope our findings will help consumers make more informed decisions about how they use fitness trackers, help companies improve the privacy and security of their offerings, and help regulators understand the current landscape of wearable products.” --Andrew Hilts, Executive Director, Open Effect and Research Fellow, The Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, and the University of Toronto The researchers sought contact with the seven fitness tracker companies whose products exhibited security vulnerabilities; Apple was not contacted because researchers found no technical vulnerabilities in the Apple Watch using their methodology. Fitbit, Intel (Basis), and Mio responded and engaged the researchers in a dialogue. Fitbit further expressed interest in exploring the topic of implementing Bluetooth privacy features in its communications with the researchers. “Wearable devices are marketed on their ability to improve fitness by collecting and transmitting health-related data. It is imperative that consumers understand the efforts companies have undertaken to be careful stewards of this data so they can choose products that enable healthier lifestyles without endangering persons’ privacy.” --Dr. Christopher Parsons, Postdoctoral Fellow at the Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, and the University of Toronto As a result of this research, consumers concerned about their locational privacy are advised to only wear their fitness device while connected to their mobile device. Moreover, findings cast doubt on the reliability of data for insurance or evidentiary purposes. Finally, certain applications by Garmin and Withings can expose fitness as well as biographical material (e.g. name, age, and gender) to third parties by transmitting information without encryption; users should evaluate whether they are comfortable with such practices that could expose their personal information to unauthorized parties. Concerned users can contact companies themselves for further details on their progress in resolving these security vulnerabilities: Read the full report: https://openeffect.ca/reports/Every_Step_You_Fake.pdf For media inquiries, contact: Dena Allen Public Affairs & Engagement Munk School of Global Affairs Tel: 416.946.0123 Mobile: 416.795.3902 dena.allen@utoronto.ca Guide on Citing In Media Title: Every Step You Fake: A Comparative Analysis of Fitness Tracker Privacy and Security Published By: Open Effect and Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto Authors: Andrew Hilts, Christopher Parsons, Jeffrey Knockel. Funded By: Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada’s Contributions Program Publication Date: 2 February 2016 Report URL: https://openeffect.ca/fitness-tracker-privacy-and-security

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

Toronto, ON - A number of journalists, activists, politicians and public figures in Latin America have been targeted by a large-scale hacking campaign since 2008, according to a new report from the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab. Researchers have named the malicious actor behind the attacks as “Packrat,” to highlight the attacker’s preference for Remote Access Trojans (RATs) and for using the same domain names and servers over many years. The report, written by Citizen Lab Senior Researchers John Scott-Railton, Morgan Marquis-Boire, and Claudio Guarnieri, in collaboration with researcher Marion Marschalek, highlights the threats that journalists and civil society face from determined adversaries. The study began when Citizen Lab researchers began receiving evidence of malware attacks against public figures and journalists in Ecuador. Their analysis found that these attacks were linked to an unsuccessful malware attack against Alberto Nisman, a high-profile lawyer who was found dead in January 2015 just hours before he was due to release a report condemning the Argentine government. Building from this discovery, the report uncovers Packrat’s extensive activity in Argentina, Ecuador, Brazil, and Venezuela. Citizen Lab researchers, examining almost three dozen attacks, discovered that Packrat creates and maintains websites and social media accounts for fake opposition groups and news organizations, then uses them to distribute malware and conduct phishing attacks against journalists, political figures, activists, and politicians. The report also documents a fake login page used to target members of Ecuador’s National Assembly. The report concludes that, while clear attribution to a particular sponsor is not possible, the information collected by Packrat likely makes its way to at least one government.  “This case is yet another example of the digital threats confronting civil society, and the role that academic research plays in shedding light on the problem,” said Citizen Lab Director Ron Deibert.

-30-

For more information:

Irene Poetranto Communications Officer, Citizen Lab 416-946-8903 irene.poetranto@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

TORONTO, ON -- Interface Biologics Inc. (IBI), an innovative developer of biomedical-polymer technologies which improve the safety and effectiveness of medical devices, is pleased to announce the completion of a Series B financing round led by DSM Venturing and existing investor, BDC Capital. “Interface Biologics is a great strategic and a financial investment for DSM” remarked Pieter Wolters, Managing Director of DSM Venturing, the corporate venturing arm of Royal DSM, a €10 billion global science-based company active in health, nutrition and materials. “The fit with DSM’s activities in Biomedical offers significant opportunities to create incremental value.” “BDC Capital has been an early and active investor in Interface Biologics since 2004”, stated Dion Madsen, Senior Managing Partner in the Healthcare Venture Fund at BDC. “We believe the Company is at the right stage to capitalize on the opportunity to work with a major strategic investor and accelerate the commercialization of its polymer technologies and the products that they enable.” “We’re very pleased to have completed this Series B financing”, commented Tom Reeves, President & CEO of Interface Biologics. “Having a strategic investor like DSM in combination with BDC underscores both IBI’s success to date and the confidence that our investors have in our future. We look forward to working with DSM as we continue the commercial development of our surface modifying macromolecules and our drug delivery polymer technology platforms.” About Interface Biologics, Inc. Interface Biologics is a commercial stage privately held company that develops transformative biomedical polymer technology to improve the safety and effectiveness of medical devices. IBI’s primary  technology focus areas are surface modifying macro-molecules and polymer enabled combination drug delivery devices. IBI, a University of Toronto spinoff, is located at the MaRS Centre in Toronto, Canada. For more information about Interface Biologics, please visit www.interfacebiologics.com About DSM - Bright Science. Brighter Living™ Royal DSM is a global science-based company active in health, nutrition and materials. By connecting its unique competences in Life Sciences and Materials Sciences DSM is driving economic prosperity, environmental progress and social advances to create sustainable value for all stakeholders simultaneously. DSM delivers innovative solutions that nourish, protect and improve performance in global markets such as food and dietary supplements, personal care, feed, medical devices, automotive, paints, electrical and electronics, life protection, alternative energy and bio-based materials. DSM’s 24,500 employees deliver annual net sales of around €10 billion. The company is listed on NYSE Euronext. More information can be found at www.dsm.com. About DSM Venturing DSM Venturing is an active investor in DSM’s strategic growth fields including Human Nutrition, Biomedical and Solar. DSM Venturing's mission is to explore and take positions in emerging companies in these strategic growth fields in order to create options for DSM and create value. For more information about DSM Venturing see www.dsm.com/venturing. About BDC Capital Healthcare Venture Fund BDC Capital’s Healthcare Venture Fund invests in transformative Canadian companies that will dramatically increase healthcare productivity by reducing healthcare costs while improving patient health. The experienced team manages $270 million in capital across two different funds and invests in drugs, devices, diagnostics and digital health sectors. For more information please visit www.bdccapital.ca/health.

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For more information, contact: Julie Fotheringham Partner, Hageman Communications Tel: 416-951-7988 Julie.fotheringham@hageman.ca

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

TORONTO, ON -- Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird today announced a new partnership with the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs to launch the Digital Public Square project, an up to $9-million initiative that will increase digital space for free expression and open political dialogue in places where civil society and citizen participation are under threat. By facilitating safer and accessible open space online, people living in repressive or restrictive environments can exchange their views on the decisions and institutions that affect their lives.

“Canada believes that by harnessing new digital technologies to support freedom and democracy we can help give a voice to the voiceless,” said Minister Baird. “Through the Digital Public Square project, the Munk School of Global Affairs will create open digital spaces to enable citizens to hold their governments to account in defending freedom, democracy, human rights and the rule of law.”

The Digital Public Square project at the Munk School will rely on the tools and technologies of the global information era to open space online in restrictive or repressive environments so that citizens are empowered to articulate their interests, exchange views freely, advocate for their rights and share views on the policies that affect them. The initiative will provide citizens and civil society organizations with increased access to global information and communications networks, improved connectivity with others living in and outside their countries, and support for citizens’ monitoring and reporting on human rights violations or political repression.

“We are excited to expand the Global Dialogue’s effort to support citizens,” said Janice Stein, founding director and now professor at the Munk School. “Creating a Digital Public Square is fundamentally about enabling the largest possible number of active participants to choose the best in the marketplace of ideas.”

The project will build on the pioneering work of the Munk School’s Global Dialogue on the Future of Iran.

To view this document on the department website, please click on the following link:  http://www.international.gc.ca/media/aff/news-communiques/2015/01/06a.aspx

A backgrounder follows.

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For further information, media representatives may contact:

Media Relations Office Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada Tel: 343-203-7700 media@international.gc.ca Follow us on Twitter: @CanadaFP Like us on Facebook: Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada-DFATD

Backgrounder - Digital Public Square Project

The Digital Public Square project’s activities will help to:

  • Increase political accountability and transparency;
  • Support citizen monitoring of human rights violations;
  • Increase connectivity between a community’s global diaspora and domestic and international stakeholders to help generate and share alternative narratives on key issues of concern;
  • Broaden the number of people who can participate in active national debates, including marginalized or purposefully excluded groups;
  • Increase the access that citizens, civil society organizations and activists have to global information and communications networks;
  • Increase connectivity between citizens and civil society within their own countries; and
  • Amplify diverse voices, narratives and expression in oppressive societies.

 -END-

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

TORONTO, ON -- In the decade since the genome was sequenced in 2003, scientists, engineers and doctors have struggled to answer an all-consuming question: Which DNA mutations cause disease? A new computational technique developed at the University of Toronto may now be able to tell us. A Canadian research team led by professor Brendan Frey has developed the first method for ‘ranking’ genetic mutations based on how living cells ‘read’ DNA, revealing how likely any given alteration is to cause disease. They used their method to discover unexpected genetic determinants of autism, hereditary cancers and spinal muscular atrophy, a leading genetic cause of infant mortality. Their findings appear in today’s issue of the Science, a leading journal. Think of the human genome as a mysterious text, made up of three billion letters. “Over the past decade, a huge amount of effort has been invested into searching for mutations in the genome that cause disease, without a rational approach to understanding why they cause disease,” says Frey, also a senior fellow at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. “This is because scientists didn’t have the means to understand the text of the genome and how mutations in it can change the meaning of that text.” Biologist Eric Lander of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology captured this puzzle in his famous quote: “Genome. Bought the book. Hard to read.” What was Frey’s approach? We know that certain sections of the text, called exons, describe the proteins that are the building blocks of all living cells. What wasn’t appreciated until recently is that other sections, called introns, contain instructions for how to cut and paste exons together, determining which proteins will be produced. This ‘splicing’ process is a crucial step in the cell’s process of converting DNA into proteins, and its disruption is known to contribute to many diseases. Most research into the genetic roots of disease has focused on mutations within exons, but increasingly scientists are finding that diseases can’t be explained by these mutations. Frey’s team took a completely different approach, examining changes to text that provides instructions for splicing, most of which is in introns. Frey’s team used a new technology called ‘deep learning’ to teach a computer system to scan a piece of DNA, read the genetic instructions that specify how to splice together sections that code for proteins, and determine which proteins will be produced. Unlike other machine learning methods, deep learning can make sense of incredibly complex relationships, such as those found in living systems in biology and medicine. “The success of our project relied crucially on using the latest deep learning methods to analyze the most advanced experimental biology data,” says Frey, whose team included members from University of Toronto’s Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty of Medicine and the Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, as well as Microsoft Research and the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. “My collaborators and our graduate students and postdoctoral fellows are world-leading experts in these areas.” Once they had taught their system how to read the text of the genome, Frey’s team used it to search for mutations that cause splicing to go wrong. They found that their method correctly predicted 94 percent of the genetic culprits behind well-studied diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy and colorectal cancer, but more importantly, made accurate predictions for mutations that had never been seen before. They then launched a huge effort to tackle a condition with complex genetic underpinnings: autism spectrum disorder. “With autism there are only a few dozen genes definitely known to be involved and these account for a small proportion of individuals with this condition,” says Frey. In collaboration with Dr. Stephen Scherer, senior scientist and director of The Centre for Applied Genomics at SickKids and the University of Toronto McLaughlin Centre, Frey’s team compared mutations discovered in the whole genome sequences of children with autism, but not in controls. Following the traditional approach of studying protein-coding regions, they found no differences. However, when they used their deep learning system to rank mutations according to how much they change splicing, surprising patterns appeared. “When we ranked mutations using our method, striking patterns emerged, revealing 39 novel genes having a potential role in autism susceptibility,” Frey says. And autism is just the beginning—this mutation indexing method is ready to be applied to any number of diseases, and even non-disease traits that differ between individuals. Dr. Juan Valcárcel Juárez, a researcher with the Center for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona, Spain, who was not involved in this research, says: “In a way it is like having a language translator: it allows you to understand another language, even if full command of that language will require that you also study the underlying grammar. The work provides important information for personalized medicine, clearly a key component of future therapies.”

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Notes to editors: Brendan Frey is a professor in The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, with cross-appointments to the Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, Department of Molecular Genetics, Department of Computer Science, and McLaughlin Centre at University of Toronto. He is a senior fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, and a member of the Technical Advisory Board of Microsoft Research. This research was supported by: Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR); Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR); Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC); McLaughlin Centre; Autism Speaks; Genome Canada; Autism Training Program. Media contacts: RJ Taylor Communications & Media Relations Strategist Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering University of Toronto Tel: 416-978-4498; rj.taylor@utoronto.ca  

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

TORONTO, ON -- Pretty soon, powering your tablet could be as simple as wrapping it in cling wrap. That’s Illan Kramer’s hope. Kramer and colleagues have just invented a new way to spray solar cells onto flexible surfaces using miniscule light-sensitive materials known as colloidal quantum dots (CQDs)—a major step toward making spray-on solar cells easy and cheap to manufacture. “My dream is that one day you’ll have two technicians with Ghostbusters backpacks come to your house and spray your roof,” says Kramer, a post-doctoral fellow with The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto and IBM Canada’s Research and Development Centre. Solar-sensitive CQDs printed onto a flexible film could be used to coat all kinds of weirdly shaped surfaces, from patio furniture to an airplane’s wing. A surface the size of your car’s roof wrapped with CQD-coated film would produce enough energy to power three 100-Watt light bulbs—or 24 compact fluorescents. He calls his system sprayLD, a play on the manufacturing process called ALD, short for atomic layer deposition, in which materials are laid down on a surface one atom-thickness at a time. Until now, it was only possible to incorporate light-sensitive CQDs onto surfaces through batch processing—an inefficient, slow and expensive assembly-line approach to chemical coating. SprayLD blasts a liquid containing CQDs directly onto flexible surfaces, such as film or plastic, like printing a newspaper by applying ink onto a roll of paper. This roll-to-roll coating method makes incorporating solar cells into existing manufacturing processes much simpler. In two recent papers in the journals Advanced Materials and Applied Physics Letters, Kramer showed that the sprayLD method can be used on flexible materials without any major loss in solar-cell efficiency. Kramer built his sprayLD device using parts that are readily available and rather affordable—he sourced a spray nozzle used in steel mills to cool steel with a fine mist of water, and a few regular air brushes from an art store. “This is something you can build in a Junkyard Wars fashion, which is basically how we did it,” says Kramer. “We think of this as a no-compromise solution for shifting from batch processing to roll-to-roll.” “As quantum dot solar technology advances rapidly in performance, it’s important to determine how to scale them and make this new class of solar technologies manufacturable,” said Professor Ted Sargent, vice dean, research in the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering at University of Toronto and Kramer’s supervisor. “We were thrilled when this attractively manufacturable spray-coating process also led to superior performance devices showing improved control and purity.” In a third paper in the journal ACS Nano, Kramer and his colleagues used IBM’s BlueGeneQ supercomputer to model how and why the sprayed CQDs perform just as well as—and in some cases better than—their batch-processed counterparts. This work was supported by the IBM Canada Research and Development Centre, and by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology.

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Watch video: http://youtu.be/Q7DZzufHy1o More information: Marit Mitchell Senior Communications Officer, The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering 416-978-7997; marit.mitchell@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

TORONTO, ON -- University of Toronto undergraduates Moustafa Abdalla and Caroline Leps are heading to Oxford University next year for postgraduate studies as two of Canada’s 11 students named 2015 Rhodes Scholars.

The prestigious Rhodes Scholarship program is the oldest, postgraduate award program supporting outstanding, all-round students at Oxford. Rhodes Scholars have gone on to become Pulitzer Prize winners, heads of state or government and Nobel Laureates. Among the well-known Rhodes Scholars: Bob Rae; from U of T President David Naylor; Bill Clinton; and Rachel Maddow.

“It hasn’t settled in yet. It’s really exciting. I can only imagine the kinds of opportunities I will have [at Oxford],” said Leps, currently studying global health and international relations. She will be pursuing a master's degree in comparative social policy, with aspirations to become a paediatrician working in global children’s health in low- and middle-income settings.

Abdalla, a student of Victoria College at Victoria University at U of T, is studying biochemistry and physiology and also works as a youth director at Flemingdon Park Parents Association. He plans to study computational biology and computational medicine research at Oxford, and hopes to one day contribute to the advancement of medicine through the ethical use of technology and artificial intelligence.

“We are currently developing artificial intelligence that is capable of teaching itself, and teaching other artificial intelligence,” said Abdalla. “The stock exchange is an example of computers teaching other computers how to trade stocks. We don’t realize the implications of this.”

So far, just 69 students from around the world have been awarded Rhodes Scholarships this year; however, a total of 83 scholarships are expected to be announced.

“On behalf of the U of T community, I congratulate Moustafa Abdalla and Caroline Leps on being selected Rhodes Scholars,” said President Meric Gertler. “I would also like to thank them for their example. Each has an outstanding record of multifaceted excellence, and both are determined to use their talent and learning to benefit individuals and communities, here and around the world. In this they demonstrate brilliantly the highest ideals of the University of Toronto.”

Last year, two alumnae from the U of T’s Innis College – Aliyyah Ahad and Chloe Walker – were named Rhodes Scholars. And, in 2012, the university had three Rhodes Scholars.

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See the full list of Rhodes Scholars:  http://www.rhodeshouse.ox.ac.uk/rhodes-scholars-elect-class-of-2015.

To arrange interviews, please contact:

Dominic Ali Media Relations Officer University of Toronto 21 King's College Circle Toronto, ON M5S 3J3 Tel: 416-978-6974 d.ali@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

TORONTO, ON—Poking at your smartphone with your finger is so 2014—it’s time to find new ways to interface with the mobile devices we all carry. That’s the challenge Professor Parham Aarabi of The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at University of Toronto posed to his graduate class. “I encouraged students to think outside the box of how we interact with mobile devices, including wearables,” says Professor Aarabi. “I wanted them think: can we do better?” On Monday, December 8, 2014, graduate students will present the six strongest products to arise from the exercise. Expect to see totally new ways to leverage the smartphones, tablets and wearables you rely on daily. The finalists are: Barcode Passport—Never carry a wallet again with a virtual barcode that replaces your cards Whistle Finder—Lost your phone? Whistle for it, and it whistles back Motion Cam—Forget fumbling for buttons—take a picture with a flick of the wrist Clap Controller—Ditch the handheld clicker and clap to advance a presentation OweME—Who still owes you for dinner last night? Keep track of money leant and borrowed PlaceIt— Ever wish you had virtual location-based sticky notes? PlaceIt is exactly that, reminding you of notes as you arrive at different destinations Professor Aarabi and each of the groups will be available for interviews following the presentations. Event Details What: Unveiling the Future of Mobile UI When: Monday, December 8, 2014 Time: 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. Where: Bahen Centre for Information Technology, Room 1210, 30 St. George Street, University of Toronto M5S 2E4 Map: http://map.utoronto.ca/building/080

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For more information, contact: Marit Mitchell Senior communications officer The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering 416-978-7997; marit.mitchell@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

TORONTO, ON - The University of Toronto, Chematria and IBM are combining forces in a quest to find new treatments for the Ebola virus. Using a virtual research technology invented by Chematria, a startup housed at U of T’s Impact Centre, the team will use software that learns and thinks like a human chemist to search for new medicines. Running on Canada’s most powerful supercomputer, the effort will simulate and analyze the effectiveness of millions of hypothetical drugs in just a matter of weeks. “What we are attempting would have been considered science fiction, until now,” says Abraham Heifets (PhD), a U of T graduate and the chief executive officer of Chematria. “We are going to explore the possible effectiveness of millions of drugs, something that used to take decades of physical research and tens of millions of dollars, in mere days with our technology.” (Read the Mashable story about Chematria.) (See the CTV news story.) Chematria’s technology is a virtual drug discovery platform based on the science of deep learning neural networks and has previously been used for research on malaria, multiple sclerosis, C. difficile, and leukemia. Much like the software used to design airplanes and computer chips in simulation, this new system can predict the possible effectiveness of new medicines, without costly and time-consuming physical synthesis and testing. The system is driven by a virtual brain that teaches itself by “studying” millions of datapoints about how drugs have worked in the past. With this vast knowledge, the software can apply the patterns it has learned to predict the effectiveness of hypothetical drugs, and suggest surprising uses for existing drugs, transforming the way medicines are discovered. The World Health Organization has projected that new cases of Ebola could reach 10,000 each week by December 2014, underscoring the urgent need for research to address the crisis. The unprecedented speed and scale of this investigation is enabled by the unique strengths of the three partners: Chematria is offering the core artificial intelligence technology that performs the drug research, U of T is contributing biological insights about Ebola that the system will use to search for new treatments and IBM is providing access to Canada’s fastest supercomputer, Blue Gene/Q. “Our team is focusing on the mechanism Ebola uses to latch on to the cells it infects,” said Dr. Jeffrey Lee of the University of Toronto. “If we can interrupt that process with a new drug, it could prevent the virus from replicating, and potentially work against other viruses like Marburg and HIV that use the same mechanism.” While there are “broad spectrum” antibiotics that can treat multiple kinds of bacterial infections, most antiviral medications are only effective against a single kind of virus. The initiative may also demonstrate an alternative approach to high-speed medical research. While giving drugs to patients will always require thorough clinical testing, zeroing in on the best drug candidates can take years using today’s most common methods. Critics say this slow and prohibitively expensive process is one of the key reasons that finding treatments for rare and emerging diseases is difficult. “If we can find promising drug candidates for Ebola using computers alone,” said Heifets, “it will be a milestone for how we develop cures.”

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For more information, please contact:

Michael Kennedy Media Relations 416-946-5025 m.kennedy@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more. 

TORONTO, ON – The University of Toronto will receive more than $3 million in funding to increase its training and support for student entrepreneurship as part of the Campus-Linked Accelerator Program (CLA), announced today by Reza Moridi, Ontario’s Minister of Research and Innovation, and Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities. “Fostering the entrepreneurial spirit among students is a key component of Ontario’s Youth Jobs Strategy, through programs that help transfer their ideas and skills to the marketplace while creating rewarding careers,” said Minister Moridi. “By partnering with colleges and universities to support entrepreneurship, we are ensuring our province’s business leaders of tomorrow are getting the support they need to succeed today.” The University of Toronto produces more startups than any other university in Canada and is already home to a diverse ecosystem of entrepreneurship supports, including accelerators, programs, courses, classes and co-curricular organizations. The $3,056,000 of funding over two years will enable the University of Toronto to better coordinate its entrepreneurship activities, expand the base of students exposed to entrepreneurship at the university and enhance the quality of training. “The University of Toronto has long been a leader in fostering entrepreneurship,” said Scott Mabury, U of T’s vice-president of university operations. “This new investment allows us to strengthen the impact of our range of initiatives and intensify our ties with the regional innovation ecosystem.” With this funding, U of T will continue to build on its long track record of success in this area by expanding the entrepreneurship opportunities it offers to students, primarily through its four principal accelerators: The Creative Destruction Lab (Rotman School of Management), The Hatchery (Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering), The Impact Centre (Faculty of Arts & Science), and UTEST (The Innovation and Partnerships Office, produced in partnership with MaRS Innovation). U of T’s Banting and Best Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship will operate as an umbrella accelerator to coordinate entrepreneurship activities across the University’s three campuses. “The CLA program will greatly enhance what the University of Toronto can offer its community in terms of entrepreneur-focused education and support,” said Jesse Rodgers, director of the Creative Destruction Lab at the Joseph L. Rotman School of Management. “The University is rich with experience, research, and raw talent to build strong companies. With support from the CLA initiative more students will have what they need to be successful.”

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For more information: U of T Media Relations Tel: 417-978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

Below is a selection of recent press releases. For all the latest news please visit www.utoronto.ca/news

September 20, 2017

Fujitsu Laboratories and University of Toronto Enter Strategic Partnership

Toronto, ON – Kawasaki, Japan and Toronto, Canada, September 20, 2017 Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the University of Toronto have entered into a new partnership, with Fujitsu Laboratories establishing a new research center in Toronto focused on bolstering R&D into breakthrough quantum computing technologies. In a wide variety of fields, including healthcare, finance, logistics, public policy, there exists an enormous amount of extraordinarily complex problems that require rapid decision making, yet cannot be solved in a realistic time-frame with current computing…

September 19, 2017

Rotman School Professor Appointed to Lead Research Initiatives at the International Centre for Pension Management

Toronto, ON – Mikhail (Mike) Simutin, an associate professor of finance at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, has been appointed the associate director of research for the International Centre for Pension Management (ICPM). In the new role he will drive ICPM’s research initiatives and strengthen the organization’s position as a global pension research hub. Prof. Simutin will oversee calls for research proposals, select winning submissions, as well as develop impactful agendas for bi-annual ICPM Discussion Forums. In this…

September 12, 2017

Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find

Toronto, ON – Kids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found. OISE’s Jackman Institute of Child Studies (JICS) Professor Kang Lee and study co-authors say that while praise is one of the most commonly used forms…

September 11, 2017

Faculty and Doctoral Students Honoured with Research Awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – Current faculty members and a former doctoral student from the areas of accounting, organizational behaviour and strategic management have received awards for their research papers from academic associations and publications. A paper published in Administrative Science Quarterly was honoured with two top awards last month. Whitened Résumés: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market is co-authored by Profs. Sonia Kang, Katy DeCelles, and András Tilcsik, along with Sora Jun, an assistant professor at UT Dallas, who is a graduate…

September 7, 2017

New Canadian telescope will map largest volume of space ever surveyed

Toronto, ON – A Canadian effort to build one of the most innovative radio telescopes in the world will open the universe to a new dimension of scientific study. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, today installed the final piece of this new radio telescope, which will act as a time machine allowing scientists to create a three-dimensional map of the universe extending deep into space and time. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, known as CHIME, is an extraordinarily…

September 6, 2017

Students at University of Toronto receive Canada’s largest STEM scholarship

Toronto, ON – Andres Lombo, Aiden Aird, Carl Pinter and Jack Stanley have been named The University of Toronto’s recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships. Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) in their future careers. This year, there were over 1,300 Schulich Leader Nominees from across Canada vying for 50 scholarships, valued at up to $100,000 each. Since inception,…

August 30, 2017

University of Toronto astrophysicists convert moons and rings of Saturn into music

Toronto, ON –After centuries of looking with awe and wonder at the beauty of Saturn and its rings, we can now listen to them, thanks to the efforts of astrophysicists at the University of Toronto (U of T). “To celebrate the Grand Finale of NASA’s Cassini mission next month, we converted Saturn’s moons and rings into two pieces of music,” says astrophysicist Matt Russo, a postdoctoral researcher at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) in the Faculty of Arts…

See all news releases

General Inquiries
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

U of T in the News

The Globe and Mail | September 21, 2017

Ottawa must improve research funding – or risk losing the innovation race

President Meric Gertler co-authors an op-ed urging the federal government to respond to the findings of the Fundamental Science Review. Read more.

Forbes | September 20, 2017

You can learn to build aerial taxis with Udacity’s new Flying Car Nanodegree

University of Toronto professor Angela Schoellig is developing curriculum for a Flying Car program with online education company Udacity. Read more. 

The Globe and Mail | September 20, 2017

Historic $100-million donation given to Peter Munk Cardiac Centre

Peter Munk's U of T philanthropy is mentioned in report on his latest donation to the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, which will partner with the Rotman School of Management to commercialize AI procedures. Read more.