Toronto, ON – Infants in Canada’s north are facing alarming rates of respiratory infection, but providing an antibody to all infants will prevent hundreds of hospitalizations of babies in the Arctic and save hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. In a paper published today in CMAJ Open, researchers conducted the largest study ever of infant admission due to lower respiratory tract infections. They focused on admissions to health facilities by children under 12 months old in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Nunavik – the northern region of Quebec. The research uncovered wide disparity in admission rates, ranging from 3.9 per cent in the Northwest Territories to 45.6 per cent in Nunavik, which is the highest rate ever reported in the world. By comparison, the rate of respiratory infection in the first year of life in North America is estimated to be between one and three per cent. More than 40 per cent were diagnosed specifically with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), either alone or with other viruses. “The likely reasons for these high rates may include living in overcrowded conditions, exposure to cigarette smoke as well as the associated challenges of living in remote areas and poverty. But, there could be a genetic risk specific to Inuit. The fact is, nobody knows for sure,” said Professor Anna Banerji, Faculty Lead of Indigenous and Refugee Health in the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Medicine. Banerji was lead author on the paper that included co-authors from across the country and was based in five northern hospitals and four tertiary hospitals. “What really stands out is that in certain areas, two to three per cent of all babies born are put on life support. As a result of the infections, many babies are evacuated by air to southern health centres in Edmonton, Winnipeg, Ottawa and Montreal, where they receive intensive care. They’re young babies – on average three months old – and generally don’t have any underlying risk factors, but they’re often at death’s door. In addition to long periods of hospitalization, they can be placed on life support for extended periods of time and frequently suffer from complications, some of those having long-term consequences” said Banerji. In a second paper also published in CMAJ Open, researchers found that by providing universal access to the RSV antibody palivizumab in regions of Nunavut and Nunavik, the rates of hospitalization could be substantially reduced and in certain areas it would actually save money. Currently, palivizumab is given by monthly injections during the RSV season to infants considered at high risk for severe disease excluding most Inuit infants. But the researchers found that by giving the antibody to all healthy babies under six months of age at the start of the RSV season, some northern health systems can save $35,000 to $50,000 per RSV infection avoided. The regional Government of Nunavik has just announced that will be providing palivizumab to all term Inuit infants. “It’s a very cost effective to give this antibody to healthy term Inuit babies in regions of Nunavut and Nunavik. It’s much cheaper to prevent RSV with this antibody than to pay for hospital treatment. We’d save money and prevent suffering and long term suffering,” said Banerji. -30- For More Information: Liam Mitchell Associate Director, Office of Communications Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto 416-978-4672 (office) 647-522-2513 (mobile) liam.mitchell@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – Researchers at the University of Toronto have investigated the amount of free sugar in Canadian prepackaged foods and beverages. The results suggest that new guidelines and better food labeling is needed to help consumers make better choices. Free sugar, commonly referred to as added sugar, is considered a “hidden” source of calories, as it’s not always apparent to consumers they are present. Also, the excessive consumption of free sugar has been associated with an increased risk of obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and tooth decay. The same ill-health effects are not associated with naturally occurring sugars, such as those found in fruits and vegetables, because they are still in their natural or intact form along with many vitamins, minerals, and often fibre. The research team, which was led by Professor Mary L’Abbé, used a vast database of food labeling information – the University of Toronto’s Food Label Information Program – to identify the grams of sugar present in more than 15,000 products. The products were categorized into 17 sugar-focused major food groups, including 77 major subcategories and 207 minor categories. The researchers then applied an algorithm, that primarily uses the total sugar content and ingredient list, to determine what percentage of the total sugar came from free sugar. The results show that eight of the 17 food groups have more than 75% of the total sugar coming from free sugar. Those with the highest proportion, as might be expected, were desserts (94%), sugars and sweets (91%) and bakery products (83%). Free sugar contributed 20% of calories overall in prepackaged foods and beverages. The findings were reported in the journal Nutrients on September 21, 2016. “Without information on the free sugar content of foods, it’s hard for consumers to know how much free sugar is too much,” said Jodi Bernstein, who was first author of the paper. Bernstein and L’Abbé are hoping this paper will help demonstrate to policymakers the need for clear food labels that will help consumers monitor their consumption compared to the daily amount of free sugar that is recommended. “People are rightfully concerned about how much sugar they are consuming,” said L’Abbé. “If they are going to be concerned about sugar, we want to make sure their concern is focused is on the right kind of sugar: free sugar.” She points out that Health Canada is currently reviewing food labeling policy in Canada, which occurs every 10 to 15 years. While a similar review in the United States led the Food and Drug Administration to require added sugar to be reported on labels starting in July 2018, that hasn’t yet happened in Canada. “While Canada and the United States generally have very similar food labeling requirements, it’s unfortunate that we haven’t taken a similar step in this instance,” said L’Abbé. -30- For more Information: Liam Mitchell Associate Director, Office of Communications Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto 416-978-4672 (office) 647-522-2513 (mobile) liam.mitchell@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – Discovering stem cells here was just the beginning. Now, the University of Toronto is pushing the frontiers of regenerative medicine even further with a $27-million investment in 20 transformative projects. The team projects, which range from attempting to improve failing eyesight in aging populations to finding better treatments for stroke and liver disease, are receiving funding through the university’s newly created Medicine by Design initiative. “These projects are bringing together leading life scientists, engineers, doctors and computer scientists at U of T and our partner hospitals to tackle and solve some of the biggest hurdles in regenerative medicine,” said Meric Gertler, president of the University of Toronto, “I look forward to seeing discoveries emerging from these projects that will transform the way we develop cures to devastating diseases.” “In addition to researching fundamental questions, the Medicine by Design projects include innovations slated to be ready for clinical trials within a few years, as well as enabling technologies with the potential to accelerate their cost-effective implementation,” said Vivek Goel, U of T’s vice-president of research and innovation. “They will help strengthen U of T’s reputation as a global centre in the growing field of regenerative medicine and cell therapy, power Toronto’s vibrant biomedical ecosystem and — most importantly — lay the foundation for improved outcomes for patients around the world,” he said. Last summer, the federal government gave the University of Toronto the largest single research award in its history — $114 million — to support Medicine by Design, which builds on a rich legacy of U of T contributions to regenerative medicine, starting with the identification of blood stem cells by biophysicist James Till and hematologist Ernest McCulloch in 1960. This discovery was instrumental in the use of blood stem cell transplants to treat diseases such as leukemia. The funding for Medicine by Design was the first grant announced under the government’s Canada First Research Excellence Fund. In the decades since the Till and McCulloch discovery, stem cells have come to be seen by scientists as potentially offering ways to treat — and perhaps cure — a host of devastating and costly illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, blindness and neurodegenerative disorders. Medicine by Design provides a framework to design the cells, materials and therapeutics to reach this goal. It harnesses the exceptional expertise at U of T and its affiliated hospitals and fosters unique multidisciplinary collaborations to generate new discoveries in regenerative medicine. Through strategic investments and partnerships, it is also creating a pipeline from research to commercialization that will enable Canada to realize the full value of its research advances and bring them to the world. Globally, the regenerative medicine industry is expected to grow in value to tens of billions of dollars in the next five years. The $27 million will be shared over three years by 20 teams composed of more than 75 researchers and clinicians from diverse disciplines across U of T and its affiliated hospitals. The funding marks Medicine by Design’s first investment in collaborative team projects. “These projects launch at a very exciting time in biomedical research. We are accelerating the use of engineering design principles and quantitative biological modelling to nurture innovative environments where breakthroughs will emerge. That’s what Medicine by Design is all about,” said Peter Zandstra, executive director of Medicine by Design, the Canada Research Chair in Stem Cell Bioengineering and a University Professor in theInstitute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering. Funded projects include research aimed at:
  • Restoring vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration, led byMolly Shoichet, a University Professor in U of T’s Department of Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry and the Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering, and Canada Research Chair in Tissue Engineering;
  • Generating functional liver cells and engineered liver tissues from stem cells to study liver disease, test new treatments and assess new drugs, led byGordon Keller of the McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine at University Health Network, and U of T’s Department of Medical Biophysics;
  • Better understanding the circuits that control brain tissue growth through computational biology to improve treatments for stroke and cerebral palsy, led byGary Bader of theDonnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research and the departments of Molecular Genetics and Computer Scienceat U of T; and
  • Designing a new probiotic bacterium that could help the gut lining renew itself to treat inflammatory bowel diseases, led byDavid McMillen, a professor in theDepartment of Chemical and Physical Sciences at the University of Toronto Mississauga.
See the full list of funded projects. The teams were selected through a rigorous competitive process, which involved international reviewers and Medicine by Design’s scientific advisory board, composed of eight global academic leaders in regenerative medicine. Medicine by Design also offers New Ideas Grants,Commercialization and Clinical Translation Funds and post-doctoral fellowships. About the University of Toronto The University of Toronto is Canada’s leading institution of learning, discovery and knowledge creation and one of the world’s top research-intensive universities. It contributes $15.7 billion to the Canadian economy every year and has created 61 new companies based on research and technologies in the last three years, more than any other institution in North America. Established in 1827, the university operates in downtown Toronto, Mississauga and Scarborough, as well as in nine renowned partner hospitals. – 30 – Media Contact: Ann Perry Senior Communications Officer Medicine by Design 416-946-8375 ann.perry@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON –  In what University of Toronto President Meric Gertler called “an historic investment in Canadian science and innovation,” the federal and provincial governments are joining with the university to provide almost $190 million to upgrade almost half of U of T’s research labs over the next two years. The announcement of the Lab Innovation for Toronto (LIFT) project was made Thursday at U of T’s Medical Sciences Building by President Gertler, federal Innovation, Science and Economic Development Minister Navdeep Bains and Science Minister Kirsty Duncan, and provincial Higher Education Minister Deb Matthews. The university will provide $91.8 million, while the federal and provincial governments will contribute $83.7 million and $14.3 million respectively for a total of $189.8 million. “These investments will us attract and retain talent from around the world and across the country. It’s really critical,” Gertler told reporters in a scrum following the announcement. “We’re very well known as a research powerhouse but as the ministers have said if the [lab research] space is substandard it limits what this talent and faculty and student body can do. By modernizing that space the sky is really the limit.” The LIFT project will lead to the renewal of 47 percent of U of T’s research space, said Scott Mabury, vice-president operations. The labs to be renovated by the project are on average 50-years-old and comprise more than 50,000 square metres of inefficient space, he said. Work has already begun and will be complete by the spring of 2018. Using a square metre as a prop at the event, he gave the appreciative crowd an impromptu lesson in what the scale of the infrastructure project really means. If you add the current inefficient lab space up, he said, it’s equivalent in total size to 15 soccer pitches. And, if U of T was building all-new labs instead of rejuvenating existing facilities, the total cost per square metre would be approximately $12,000, totaling close to $650 million. “The renovations will modernize U of T’s research labs to increase usable space and enhance the quality of the research and learning environment,” Mabury said. “They will also improve air handling, climate and electrical systems.” The federal contribution is part of the government’s Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund, Bains said. “This once-in-a-generation investment by the Government of Canada is a historic down payment on the government’s vision to position Canada as a global centre for innovation,” he said, adding that the funding would “create the conditions for innovation and long-term growth that will keep the Canadian economy globally competitive.” Duncan, who has had first-hand experience of U of T lab facilities as both a student and instructor, agreed. “It’s a little extra special to be here today. I’m a proud UC graduate and a former faculty member . . . being back at the university is bringing back wonderful memories,” she told the crowd. “Science has a central role in [Canada’s] Innovation Agenda . . . Through investments such as these, we are strengthening the foundation for building Canada as a global leader in scientific excellence.” “Through investments such as these, we are strengthening the foundation for building Canada as a global leader in scientific excellence.” Deb Matthews, Ontario's minister of advanced education and skills development, said: “Our government is proud to support this important project, which will give University of Toronto students access to the renewed facilities they need to prepare for successful careers in science and research. We know that providing access to high-quality education and training facilities is critical to building the skilled workforce we need to support good jobs and economic growth for today and tomorrow and this investment will help us to do it.” “The LIFT project will equip our brilliant scholars, students and staff with the cutting-edge facilities they need to learn, collaborate and discover,” President Gertler said as he thanked the federal and provincial ministers. “The modernization of these labs will also reduce our greenhouse gas emissions significantly. The University of Toronto greatly appreciates the federal and provincial governments’ support of postsecondary education and research, and their leadership in ensuring Canada secures its place among global leaders of science and technology.” Daniel Haas, dean of U of T’s Faculty of Dentistry, also thanked the ministers for the infrastructure funding, which will allow the faculty to sustain its excellence and to make much-needed repairs. “Our research facilities are badly outdated,” Haas said. “Our primary building opened 57 years ago in 1959, and a number of our researchers are working out of a facility built in 1927. We have exceptionally talented people who are being limited in what they can accomplish, simply because of infrastructure. The funding announced today will allow our faculty to capitalize on their potential. It will help us modernize our existing facilities and sustain our position as leaders in health research.” The LIFT project will affect all three campuses and nine academic divisions. The facilities to be renovated include not only medical, dental, biology, chemistry and engineering labs, but also include a former horse barn north of Toronto now used for ecological research, a green roof on the historic 1 Spadina Avenue building (the new home of the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design), an electro-acoustic music studio at the Faculty of Music and many others. For example, at the University of Toronto Scarborough, the campus vivarium and the S-Wing research labs will undergo $17.8 million in renovations, while the University of Toronto Mississauga’s Davis Building will get a $17.1 million upgrade. In total, 546 labs will be fully renovated, providing state-of-the-art research facilities to an estimated 1,100 researchers and 5,500 students. Mario Ostrowski is one of those researchers. A renowned HIV scientist affiliated with St. Michael’s Hospital and U of T’s Faculty of Medicine, Ostrowski says there is fierce competition among research institutions for the best graduate students and post-docs. State-of-the-art labs will help U of T recruit the best and the brightest students, he said, and will also inspire existing researchers and students to greater achievements. “Just like great architecture inspires people every day to achieve excellence, if you’ve got a nice lab that’s state of the art, rather than something old and decrepit that’s falling apart, it inspires and stimulates people to produce excellence.” - 30 – For more information, contact: University of Toronto Media Relations Tel: (416) 978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca  

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Nanovista is one of the first 22 up-and-coming companies selected to be part of JLABS @ Toronto, an innovative research centre designed to advance bio/pharmaceutical, medical device, consumer and digital health programs. “Being a part of JLABS brings us one step closer to commercializing and delivering this product to market to help patients,” said Jinzi Zheng of her company’s injectable imaging agent that helps surgeons see where tumours are located and remove them more precisely, while leaving healthy tissue intact. “They’ll give us the right exposure to the business side and they’ll help us carve out a clear path to market. We’re scientists, we don’t have that expertise.” Of the 22 startups at JLABS announced today, at least eight have ties to the University of Toronto and its partner hospitals — like Nanovista, which developed out of research started by Zheng as she worked towards her PhD in medical biophysics. The others include: 6Biotech, App4Independence, AvroBio, DNAstack, Ketogen Pharma, Ubiquitech and Proteorex Therapeutics Inc., which is working closely with Professor Robert Batey, chair of the department of chemistry. Their new home is a gleaming 40,000-square foot facility that has cutting-edge, modular and scalable lab space, equipment and, most importantly, access to scientific, industry and capital funding experts. It also features JLABS’ first device and digital prototype lab, which was shown off today at its official opening to dignitaries such as Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, Toronto Mayor John Tory and U of T president Meric Gertler. The space, which is rented by JLABS from the University of Toronto, is the result of a unique collaboration between global giant Johnson & Johnson Innovation LLC, the university, the Government of Ontario, Janssen Inc., MaRS Innovation and several hospital partners. “The project to transform and fit out the floor into the first Canadian location for JLABS, budgeted at $18.3 million, came in on time and more than a million dollars under budget,” said Scott Mabury, U of T’s vice-president of operations.” Every speaker at the event mentioned the university and the critical role it played in making JLABS @ Toronto a reality, including Premier Wynne.   [caption id="attachment_14895" align="alignnone" width="640"] Premier Kathleen Wynne, Mayor John Tory, Ontario cabinet minister Reza Moridi and U of T president Meric Gertler were on hand for the official opening of JLABS @ Toronto (all photos by Johnny Guatto)[/caption]   “The opportunities that JLABS will create for Ontario are immense,” she said. “And while the driving force behind those successes will be the people who take their research from lab to market, we need to recognize that there are other factors. “If it weren’t for MaRS, if it weren’t for U of T, the strategic partnership stream of our Jobs and Prosperity Fund, the life sciences corridor that surrounds us today, and the whole innovation ecosystem that we’ve built here in Ontario, there would be no JLABs launch today.” With five locations in the United States, coming to Toronto next made sense. “Canada’s startup scene is booming,” explained Melinda Richter, head of JLABS. The location is also perfect — smack dab in the centre of Toronto’s bustling ecosystem of hospitals, businesses and university labs that already attract more than $1.4-billion in research funding each year to the city. The university’s Banting and Best Centre for Innovation & Entrepreneurship is also just across the street making this stretch of College Street the place to be for ambitious researchers to hang out their shingle with the hope of turning their discovery into the next big thing. “We’re excited to have JLABS @ Toronto join the University of Toronto as the newest addition to our vibrant entrepreneurship ecosystem,” said Gertler. “Together with our nine campus-led accelerators, under the umbrella of our Banting & Best Centre for Innovation & Entrepreneurship, we’re fuelling the creation of new companies, new jobs and solutions to some of the world’s most pressing challenges.” [caption id="attachment_14897" align="alignnone" width="750"] U of T president Meric Gertler at the official opening of JLABS @ Toronto (all photos by Johnny Guatto)[/caption]   For Zheng and her Nanovista co-founders, Christine Allen and David Jaffray, a world of possibilities has now opened up by joining the JLABS family. This in addition to their academic positions at U of T where Zheng is an assistant professor in the Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering and a scientist in the Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health with the University Health Network; Allen is a professor in the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy and GSK Chair in Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery; and Jaffray is a professor, director of TECHNA and executive vice-president of technology and innovation at UHN. “It’s going to be great to be able to bounce ideas around with the other startups,” Zheng said. “They’re going to have some of the same challenges as us, which means we can learn from each other. They’ll be a healthy competition.” And aside from dreams of having operating rooms around the world stocked with vials of their product, Zheng says ideally they’d like their time at JLABS to lead to them meeting the right people who can take over the business side of their company, freeing them to focus on what they know best — pushing the science forward. -30- For more information: U of T Media Relations 416-978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – The University of Toronto and the World Health Organization are proud to launch the WHO Collaborating Centre for Governance, Accountability and Transparency for the Pharmaceutical Sector with a policy workshop and celebration at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy on April 29, 2016 from 12:00 pm - 3:30 pm. This event will tackle all of the pressing questions impacting good governance, accountability, and transparency in the pharmaceutical sector, including:
  • How do we reconcile the need for innovative medicines with medicine affordability?
  • What needs to change to keep medicines marketing ethical?
  • What is already in place to ensure accountability in the pharmaceutical sector, and is it working?
  • How can the public be involved in ensuring pharmaceutical sector transparency?
The workshop will feature speakers from global health and health policy development institutions, academia, and the pharmaceutical industry, including: World Health Organization, Transparency International, University of Toronto, Innovative Medicines Canada, Toronto Star, St. Michael’s Hospital, and Canadian Generics Association We invite you to join us for this discussion. For more information about this event, please visit: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/taking-the-pulse-of-transparency-in-the-pharmaceutical-sector-tickets-23063443380 -30- For more information about the WHO Collaborating Centre for Governance, Accountability and Transparency for the Pharmaceutical Sector and the April 29, 2016 workshop and launch, please contact: Heather McAlister Research Fellow and Communications Coordinator 647-782-4099 heather.mcalister@mail.utoronto.ca  

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – Members of University of Toronto's faculty and alumni will be inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame at a ceremony taking place today at McMaster University, taking four of this year’s six spots. “This is something in which we can all take pride,” said Dr. Trevor Young, dean of the Faculty of Medicine and vice-dean of relations with health care institutions. “Through a variety of roles, from documenting the early history of medical practice in Canada to opening the door to women in the profession, this year’s honorees have made unique and valuable contributions to the field of medicine.” Two of the inductees, University Professor Michael Bliss and Professor David Naylor, are members of the U of T faculty. Bliss is described by the Hall as “the preeminent medical historian of this era” and is cited for his books on medical history, including The Discovery of Insulin, as well as his work on the 1991-92 strategic plan of the Medical Research Council of Canada. Dr. Naylor, a former president of U of T and dean of medicine, is the co-author of more than 300 scholarly publications and noted for “visionary contributions to health research, education, administration and policy,” including his leadership of Canada’s response to the SARS epidemic. May Cohen graduated at the top of her class at U of T in 1955 when fewer than seven per cent of medical students in Canada were women. She co-founded the first faculty of medicine women’s health office in 1991 at McMaster University. Gordon Guyatt earned his Bachelor of Science at U of T before obtaining his medical degree at McMaster, the medical faculty of which he joined in 1983. He is cited for his leadership in evidence-based medicine. Established in 1992 in London, Ontario, the CMHF honours medical great of the present and past. The new laureates, who also include former Canadian Prime Minister Sir Charles Tupper and McGill University AIDS researcher Mark Wainberg, will raise total membership to 119. The CMHF “celebrates Canadian heroes whose work has advanced health, thereby inspiring the pursuit of careers in the health sciences.” -30- For more information: U of T Media Relations Tel: 416-978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – It’s easier than ever to sequence our DNA, but doctors still can’t exactly tell from our genomes which diseases might befall us. Professor Fritz Roth is setting out to change this by going to basics — to our billion-year-old cousin, baker’s yeast. By testing the effects of human mutations in yeast, Roth’s research team at the University of Toronto’s Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research and the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute was able to identify harmful changes in the DNA better than leading algorithms. The ultimate goal of his approach, detailed in the latest issue of Genome Research is to create “look-up tables” of damaging mutations to help clinicians diagnose patients more accurately. The reason our genomes remain impenetrable is the vast amount of genetic diversity among us. Of the three billion DNA letters in the genome, three million are different between any two people. The vast majority of these differences, also called genetic variants, have no bearing on our lives. But some variants change proteins, the molecular machines that do much of the work in our cells — and this could lead to disease. “If we want to interpret people’s personal genomes, then we need a way of knowing whether variants are damaging the gene they are in,” says Roth, who is also a professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics and co-director of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research Genetic Networks Program. Currently the only way to predict damaging mutations, for most genes, is through computational methods. For some genes, however, damaging mutations can be detected using yeast.  The international team led by Roth did a head-on comparison of yeast against the machine to see which approach fared better at finding disease-causing mutations. Yeast cells are simple, yet their basic architecture is similar to human cells. Because almost half of our genes have a shared ancestry with a yeast gene, it is often possible to study human genes in this easy-to-manipulate living organism. One way to test a human gene’s function is to see whether it can replace a yeast counterpart gene. Think of yeast as a ship — taking a gene out leaves a hole in the bottom. Scientists then try to stop the leak by plugging the hole with the matching human gene to prevent the ship from sinking. If the normal human gene can rescue the yeast but a mutated one cannot, Roth predicts that the mutation is damaging. Thanks to yeast’s fast rate of growth, it is possible to know within days which versions of human genes fail to keep the yeast afloat. These same variants are also likely to be damaging for human cells and could matter for our health. Roth’s team focused on 22 genes, linked to conditions such as autism, mental retardation and heart disease, and whose intact copies were able to replace their yeast counterparts. Previous work found these genes to be present in hundreds of variations among people. Roth’s group tested 179 variants, roughly half of which are reported to cause disease. To test variant function, the researchers inserted each human variant, one by one, in place of a matching yeast gene, using a comprehensive library of yeast strains created by Professors Brenda Andrews and Charlie Boone’s groups at the Donnelly Centre. They then watched how well the yeast grew and this allowed them to predict whether or not a variant was harmful. Importantly, this simple test in a billion-year old machinery outperformed the best available computational methods. Based on cell-growth data, the researchers were able to identify 62 per cent of disease variants as damaging.  By contrast, the best current computational method could confidently identify only 23 per cent of disease variants. “By every measure we are beating the computational predictions. Some might say it’s obvious that an experiment beats a computational prediction, but many clinicians would not accept evidence about human variants based on how they perform in baker’s yeast. Our paper highlights the important and direct role that model organisms can play in interpreting individual human genomes,” says Roth. For the subset of human disease genes that will be able to fill in for their yeast counterparts, Roth believes it is possible to test all variants this way. For other genes, similar assays could be done in other model organisms or using other tests in yeast. The goal is to create lists of experimentally tested mutations before they are detected in the genomes of affected patients. “I think the way to go forward is to do all of the experiments up front before you’ve even seen the variants in the clinic. Organized networks of researchers could test the variants in a common way so that we can build a resource so that clinicians can go immediately to the look-up table,” says Roth. Read what Prof. Roth thinks about home-based genetic tests in the Toronto Star Doctors’ Notes [caption id="attachment_14667" align="alignnone" width="300"] The basic concept of testing human gene variants in yeast[/caption] pic2 -30- For more information: Jovana Drinjakovic, PhD Writer at the Donnelly Centre University of Toronto Tel: +41 78 929 06 14 (Zurich) jovana.drinjakovic@gmail.com thedonnellycentre.utoronto.ca @DonnellyCentre        

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON - A new national research network was launched today to transform the health outcomes of individuals with diabetes and its related complications. It will be led by two of Canada’s top researchers in the field and includes researchers conducting leading-edge health and biomedical research at nine institutions across the country. “Diabetes is a huge burden to our health system right now. One in four Canadians have diabetes or pre-diabetes and it’s costing us $16-billion per year to treat. By 2020, we anticipate that more than 3 million Canadians will have diabetes. We have an opportunity to harness the tremendous research being done in Canada to find better solutions,” said Professor Gary Lewis, Director of the Banting and Best Diabetes Centre at the University of Toronto and a Senior Scientist with the University Health Network. Lewis will lead the new Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR) Network in Diabetes and Related Complications – with Professor Jean-Pierre Després, Scientific Director of the Cardiology Division of the Quebec Heart and Lung institute, Director of Science and Innovation at Alliance santé Québec and a Professor of Kinesiology at Université Laval. Today, Federal Health Minister Jane Philpott announced funding from the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR) for five SPOR Networks in Chronic Disease. “These networks will produce the innovations that improve health of Canadians and position Canada as a global leader in research on these chronic diseases,” said CIHR President Dr. Alain Beaudet. Each SPOR Network will receive $12.45-million from CIHR to be matched by partners. The SPOR Network in Diabetes and Related Complications has partnered with the Canadian Diabetes Association, JDRF, the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research, Research Manitoba, Alliance santé Quebec, New Brunswick Health Research Foundation, as well as private sector contributors including Merck Canada Inc., Astra-Zeneca Inc., Caprion Proteome Inc., and WinSanTor Inc., for a total five-year investment of an additional $19-million for the SPOR Network in Diabetes and Related Complications. “JDRF is proud to be a SPOR partner, as we greatly value Canadian researchers working collaboratively to accelerate diabetes research. This gives patients hope for a better world, a world without type 1 diabetes (T1D) and this research will move us there faster,” said Dave Prowten, President and CEO of JDRF Canada. “Our network will facilitate meaningful connections between primary healthcare providers, their patients and relevant specialists to achieve improved care and significant cost savings within our health system,” said Després. “I have been living with T1D for 49 years, and have experienced how devastating diabetic related complications can be; I lost my eyesight 25 years ago. Last week my 14-year-old nephew was diagnosed with T1D. This disease continues its devastating path, which is what compels me to fight back and be a member of this SPOR Network,” said patient advocate Debbie Sissmore. “I am delighted to represent and advocate for the Canadians that need help in the prevention and treatment of diabetes related complications.” A focus for the network will be the impact diabetes has on vulnerable groups, including Indigenous peoples, immigrants, women and lower socio-economic groups. “We know that diabetes has a disproportionate impact on these groups, but there is still much more research to be done on why and how to deliver appropriate and culturally sensitive treatments,” said Lewis. The network will be based in Toronto at the University Health Network and University of Toronto. The other partner organizations are Université de Sherbrooke, Université Laval, Université de Montréal, University of Alberta, University of British Columbia, University of Manitoba, and the University of New Brunswick. You can learn more about the SPOR Network in Diabetes by visiting their website: www.SPORNetworkDiabetes.ca -30- For more information: Liam Mitchell Associate Director, Communications Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto Tel: 416-978-4672 Email: liam.mitchell@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON - Imagine telling a patient suffering from age-related (type-II) osteoporosis that a single injection of stem cells could restore their normal bone structure. This week, with a publication in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, a group of researchers from the University of Toronto and The Ottawa Hospital suggest that this scenario may not be too far away. Osteoporosis affects over 200M people worldwide and, unlike post-menopausal (type-I) osteoporosis, both women and men are equally susceptible to developing the age-related (type-II) form of this chronic disease. With age-related osteoporosis, the inner structure of the bone diminishes, leaving the bone thinner, less dense, and losing its function. The disease is responsible for an estimated 8.9 M fractures per year worldwide. Fractures of the hip—one of the most common breaks for those suffering from type-II osteoporosis—lead to a significant lack of mobility and, for some, can be deadly. But how can an injection of stem cells reverse the ravages of age in the bones? Professor William Stanford, senior author of the study, had in previous research demonstrated a causal effect between mice that developed age-related osteoporosis and low or defective mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in these animals. “We reasoned that if defective MSCs are responsible for osteoporosis, transplantation of healthy MSCs should be able to prevent or treat osteoporosis,” said Stanford, who is a Senior Scientist at The Ottawa Hospital and Professor at the University of Ottawa. To test that theory, the researchers injected osteoporotic mice with MSCs from healthy mice. Stem cells are “progenitor” cells, capable of dividing and changing into all the different cell types in the body. Able to become bone cells, MSCs have a second unique feature, ideal for the development of human therapies: these stem cells can be transplanted from one person to another without the need for matching (needed for blood transfusions, for instance) and without being rejected. After six months post-injection, a quarter of the life span of these animals, the osteoporotic bone had astonishingly given way to healthy, functional bone. “We had hoped for a general increase in bone health,” said John E. Davies, Professor at the Faculty of Dentistry and the Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) at the University of Toronto, and a co-author of the study. “But the huge surprise was to find that the exquisite inner “coral-like” architecture of the bone structure of the injected animals—which is severely compromised in osteoporosis—was restored to normal.” The study could soon give rise to a whole new paradigm for treating or even indefinitely postponing the onset of osteoporosis. Currently there is only one commercially available therapy for type-II osteoporosis, a drug that maintains its effectiveness for just two years. And, while there are no human stem cell trials looking at a systemic treatment for osteoporosis, the long-range results of the study point to the possibility that as little as one dose of stem cells might offer long-term relief. “It’s very exciting,” said Dr. Jeff Kiernan, first author of the study. A graduate from IBBME who is beginning a Postdoctoral Fellowship at The Ottawa Hospital with the Centre for Transfusion Research, Kiernan pursued the research for his doctoral degree. “We’re currently conducting ancillary trials with a research group in the U.S., where elderly patients have been injected with MSCs to study various outcomes. We’ll be able to look at those blood samples for biological markers of bone growth and bone reabsorption,” he added. If improvements to bone health are observed in these ancillary trials, according to Stanford, larger dedicated trials could follow within the next 5 years. Stem cells were first discovered in the early 1960s by University of Toronto Professors James E. Till and Earnest McCulloch. UofT continues to be a world leader in stem cell research. Full reference: Systemic Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Transplantation Prevents Functional Bone Loss in a Mouse Model of Age-Related Osteoporosis. Jeffrey Kiernan, Sally Hu, Marc D. Grynpas, John E. Davies, William L. Stanford. Stem Cells Translational Medicine. 2016;5:1–11 Funders: Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Canada Research Chair About the University of Toronto: The University of Toronto has assembled one of the strongest research and teaching faculties in North America, presenting top students at all levels with an intellectual environment unmatched in breadth and depth on any other Canadian campus. U of T faculty co-author more research articles than their colleagues at any university in the US or Canada other than Harvard. As a measure of impact, U of T consistently ranks alongside the top five U.S. universities whose discoveries are most often cited by other researchers around the world.  The U of T faculty are also widely recognized for their teaching strengths and commitment to graduate supervision. Established in 1827, the University of Toronto today operates in downtown Toronto, Mississauga and Scarborough, as well as in nine renowned academic hospitals. About The Ottawa Hospital: The Ottawa Hospital is one of Canada’s largest learning and research hospitals with over 1,100 beds, approximately 12,000 staff and an annual budget of over $1.2 billion. Our focus on research and learning helps us develop new and innovative ways to treat patients and improve care. As a multi-campus hospital, affiliated with the University of Ottawa, we deliver specialized care to the Eastern Ontario region, but our techniques and research discoveries are adopted around the world. We engage the community at all levels to support our vision for better patient care. -30- Media Contacts: Erin Vollick, Communications Officer, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto Erin.vollick@dentistry.utoronto.ca | (416) 979-4900 ext. 4381| (416) 409-4633 (cell) Jennifer Ganton, Director, Communications and Public Relations, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute jganton@ohri.ca |613-798-5555 ext. 73325 |613-614-5253 (cell)

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON -- Studies have shown that immigrants to the U.S., Canada, and Australia tend to be healthier and live longer than non-immigrants in their host countries, once adjustments have been made for income and education. There has been a great deal of speculation as to why this “healthy migrant effect” exists. One hypothesis proposes that it is due to self-selection such that particularly healthy individuals are more likely to choose to move to a different country, while those who are in poor health may be less willing or able to do so. A study released today by the University of Toronto and U.K.’s Medical Research Council (MRC) Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing at UCL (LHA) found support for this hypothesis using data from the MRC National Survey of Health and Development (NSHD), a large nationally representative longitudinal study of British children born in early March 1946 who have been surveyed more than twenty times over their lifetime. The study, published online this week in the Canadian Journal of Public Health, compared the childhood circumstances of 984 future emigrants with 4378 non-emigrants. “The childhood health of future migrants was much better than those who did not move to other countries,” says Professor Esme Fuller-Thomson, Sandra Rotman Endowed Chair at University of Toronto's Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work and the Institute for Life Course and Aging. Researchers found that future emigrants in the NSHD were less likely to have been born with a low birth-weight or to have a serious illness before the age of 5 and they were taller at age 6 (which reflects childhood nutrition) than were the children who did not emigrate.  It appears that factors contributing to positive health selection in migrant populations begin as far back as childhood. “We also found that future emigrants had superior cognitive ability at age 8 in comparison to their counterparts who stayed in Britain,” said co-author Sarah Brennenstuhl of the Lawrence Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing at the University of Toronto. “Higher cognitive ability has been shown in other studies to be associated with better health in adulthood and a lower likelihood of developing dementia in old age.” Future emigrants came from families with a higher socioeconomic position than those who remained permanently in the UK. “They were more likely to have fathers who were professionals, their mothers had a higher level of education, their housing quality at age 4 was better, their parents showed more interest in the children’s school progress, and their parents were more likely to own their own home when the child was 6 years old” said Professor Diana Kuh, a co-author and Director of LHA and NSHD. “Childhood socioeconomic position has been shown in the NSHD and many other studies to be highly associated with adult health.” “This study supports the healthy migrant hypothesis for migration between high-resource countries,” said Professor Kuh. A copy of the paper is available to journalists upon request. Please contact University of Toronto’s media relations officer, Dominic Ali at d.ali@utoronto.ca. -30- Media contact: Prof. Esme Fuller-Thomson Professor & Sandra Rotman Endowed Chair Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work & Institute for Life Course & Aging University of Toronto Cell: 416-209-3231 esme.fuller.thomson@utoronto.ca Dominic Ali Media Relations Officer University of Toronto Tel: 416-978-6974 d.ali@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – The Office of Continuous Professional Development at the University of Toronto’s Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, in collaboration with Cancer Care Ontario, is introducing the first comprehensive program in the province for pharmacists focused on caring for people living with cancer. The new program is designed to help practicing pharmacists acquire knowledge, develop skills, and become more comfortable in caring for cancer patients. A recent Canadian study revealed that only 13 per cent of pharmacists in community settings feel adequately prepared to provide care to their cancer patients. As a result, pharmacists are seeking out additional training in this area, including the latest oncology information, tools, and best practices to deliver quality care, ensure patient safety, and enhance health outcomes. “With the increase in people living with cancer and the advances in available cancer treatments, this program will offer pharmacists critical knowledge that is increasingly becoming part of their day-to-day practice,” says Dr. Kathy Vu, Clinical Lead of Systemic and Safety Treatment Initiatives at Cancer Care Ontario and Academic Director, Oncology for Pharmacists Program, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy. Oncology for Pharmacists: A Person-Centred Approach to Caring for People Living with Cancer is intended to help pharmacists from all practice settings learn the latest information and best practices in cancer treatment to deliver better care and improve outcomes for cancer patients. Developed by leading experts in the field, this intensive program combines in-class and online learning opportunities to provide participants with a wide range of practical tips and tools to offer safe and high-quality care to patients undergoing cancer treatment. The first component of this program, Essentials of Oncology for Pharmacists, will be offered in April 2016 as an online course. Ideal for community pharmacists and practitioners new to oncology, this foundational course forms the basis for the rest of the Oncology for Pharmacists program. This course introduces participants to key topics that are required to care for cancer patients in a holistic manner, including the pharmacology and safe handling of anticancer agents, management of common toxicities, chemotherapy prescription review, basics of cancer pain management, adherence, common drug interactions, complementary medicine patients may be exploring, palliative care, and an introduction to chemotherapy use, among many others. Presented as a self-paced series of online learning modules, the Essentials of Oncology for Pharmacists program also includes the opportunity to participate in a discussion board with others in the program, allowing participants to build a network of peers and resources to aid in their practice. At the end of the course, participants will receive a certificate of completion and will be ready to continue their educational journey in oncology. The second component of this program, Advanced Oncology for Pharmacists, consists of two parts and builds on the skills and knowledge acquired in the Essentials of Oncology for Pharmacists program, providing an in-depth approach to caring for patients with cancer. This module is ideal for graduates of the Essentials module and pharmacists who have some experience in providing care to cancer patients and have an interest in advancing their cancer care knowledge. Delivered online, the topics covered in Part 1 of Advanced Oncology for Pharmacists include advanced cancer pain management, febrile neutropenia, chemotherapy order review, oncologic emergencies, advanced complementary medicines, patient teaching and education, chemotherapy and targeted therapies, and caring for a cancer patient with comorbidities. Topics covered in Part 2 of Advanced Oncology for Pharmacists, which is delivered as an in-person workshop, include the latest information on specific cancers such as breast cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, prostate and bladder cancers, ovarian cancer, lung cancer, lymphomas, and multiple myeloma. Using a combination of didactic and case-based discussions, this program will allow participants to consolidate knowledge acquired from Essentials of Oncology and Advanced Oncology Part 1, apply best practice approaches, and make evidence-based recommendations when caring for cancer patients. "As patients' healthcare needs become increasingly complex, it's important for pharmacists to enhance their ability to provide care to patients with cancer and their families," notes Dr. Heather Boon, Dean of the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto. "The new Oncology for Pharmacists program addresses the need that exists for specialized training in the care of people living with cancer, and provides pharmacists with real world examples and skills to ensure their patients receive the best possible care." “Offering appropriate training in oncology care to healthcare providers across the province is an important component of our Ontario Cancer Plan,“ says Dr. Robin McLeod, Vice President of Clinical Programs & Quality Initiatives at Cancer Care Ontario. “We are pleased to support this program to provide standardized continuing education to pharmacists delivering care to patients with cancer.” Developed and delivered by today’s leading oncology specialists, the Oncology for Pharmacists: A Person-Centred Approach to Caring for People Living with Cancer program will provide practicing pharmacists with the knowledge, skills, and confidence to provide safe and optimal care for patients with cancer. For more information about the Oncology for Pharmacists: A Person-Centred Approach to Caring for People Living with Cancer program at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, including program start dates and registration information, please visit http://cpd.pharmacy.utoronto.ca/programs/oncology. -30-  For more information, please contact: Jef Ekins Manager, Marketing & Communications Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy University of Toronto Tel: 416-946-7036 j.ekins@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – A new study examining high-cost healthcare users in Ontario released by researchers at the University of Toronto has identified the types of patients who are high-cost users, the continuums of care that propel these high costs, and what the costs of this care were. “Who are the high-cost users? A method for person-centred attribution of healthcare spending” employed a new approach to determine the individual patients who are the drivers of healthcare spending. By seeking to understand costs by following individuals who consume a large portion of the overall costs, this information can be used to inform and target improvements in efficiency, effectiveness, and enhanced quality of care. “In looking at the issue of high-cost users from this unique perspective,” said lead author Dr. Sara Guilcher, Assistant Professor at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, “we were able to construct person-centred episodes of care, tracking patients’ care journeys from their first point of contact in an acute care setting through any subsequent care until they had recovered and returned to the community.” Using data from health administration databases housed at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), the study examined all publicly funded health system encounters in Ontario over a one-year period. Using unique encoded identifiers, the study essentially followed patients on their journey through the healthcare system as they received care from various healthcare providers, went through tests, and engaged in the recovery process. Ultimately, this approach established broad categories or archetypes for high-cost users. “Because transitions involve care across different providers, it is essential to use a patient perspective and measure individuals’ transitions over time,” said senior author Dr. Walter Wodchis, Associate Professor of the Institute for Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. By constructing high-cost health systems users in this way, the researchers were able to identify the main clinical groupings where individuals have intensive and high-cost interactions with the healthcare system. "We discovered that the individuals in the highest fifth percentile of healthcare expenditures could be meaningfully grouped into several broad categories, such as planned surgical, unplanned medical, post-admission events, trauma, mental illness and addiction, and cancer episodes,” explained Dr. Guilcher. “In doing so, we can see how costs can be attributed to individuals within the various healthcare sectors and use that information to inform decisions about performance measurement, payment models for high-cost patient groups, and facilitate service organization, care planning and payment for high cost patients across all care providers.” The study revealed that even though the number of patients in some of these groupings (for example mental health and addictions or trauma) may be lower in volume than other groupings (for example planned surgeries), the costs per episode may be significantly more. “Especially with an aging population, it is important for policy-makers to monitor the volume of patients who fall into these categories and explore new ways to provide quality services to reduce overall episode-related costs, as even slight increases in volume have the potential to substantially increase overall healthcare costs.” “Given rising healthcare costs, it is increasingly important for healthcare systems across Canada to provide efficient value-based and needs-driven care, especially for high-cost patient populations,” said Dr. Guilcher. This study was published online in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS ONE and will later be published in the print edition: (http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0149179) -30-  Media Contacts: Jef Ekins Manager, Marketing & Communications Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto Tel: (416) 978-7036 j.ekins@utoronto.ca Sara Guilcher, PT PhD Assistant Professor, University of Toronto Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy Tel: 416-946-7020 sara.guilcher@utoronto.ca http://pharmacy.utoronto.ca/users/guilcher-s Walter P. Wodchis, PhD Associate Professor, University of Toronto Institute of Health Policy Management & Evaluation Tel: 416-946-7387 walter.wodchis@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON – A new study examining elder abuse--released today by researchers at the University of Toronto, Cornell University, and Weill-Cornell Medical College--has found that older adult victims living alone with their abuser were up to four times more likely to endure more severe levels of mistreatment. The study suggests that the addition of non-perpetrators also living in the home played a protective function to buffer severity. “Older adults are particularly vulnerable to severe mistreatment when the abuser has unrestricted and uninhibited access to the victim”, said co-author Dr. Karl Pillemer, Hazel E. Reed Professor at Cornell University’s Department of Human Development and Professor of Gerontology at the Weill Cornell Medical College. Research on older adults tends to categorize subjects according to different age groups, including the “youngest old” (ages 60 to 74) and the “oldest old” (ages 85 and up). One surprising finding was that across each type of elder abuse, it was the “youngest old” who experienced the most severe forms of mistreatment. “These findings challenge the prevailing belief that the oldest old are more vulnerable to the most severe forms of elder abuse, although we need more research that includes older adults with cognitive impairment and those living in long-term care settings,” said co-author Dr. Mark Lachs, Psaty Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Co-Chief of Geriatrics at the Weill Cornell Medical College and Director of Geriatrics at the New York Presbyterian Health System. “Previous studies on elder abuse have found that approximately one in ten older adults experience some form of elder abuse,” says lead author Dr. David Burnes, an assistant professor with the University of Toronto’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. “As the population of older adults in North America nearly doubles over the next 25 years, this problem will just get bigger. Older adults who are abused have shorter lifespans, and are more likely to be hospitalized and experience mental health issues.” Previous studies have largely explored elder abuse in general yes/no terms, but this study examined different forms of elder abuse along a continuum of severity. “We know that the yes/no characterization of elder abuse does not capture the complex, lived reality of mistreatment or align with the way clinicians examine and intervene on the problem”, says the University of Toronto’s Dr. David Burnes. Data for the study came from a large-scale, representative sample of 4,156 cognitively intact, community-dwelling older adults across New York State. Among older adults reporting physical abuse since age 60, more than two-thirds (62 per cent) reported being abused in the past year and 11 per cent experienced over ten physically abusive events in the past year. The study was published online in the peer-reviewed journal The Gerontologist, and will later be published in the print edition: http://gerontologist.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/02/12/geront.gnv688.full.pdf+html -30- Media contact: David P.R. Burnes, BSc, MSW, PhD Assistant Professor, University of Toronto Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work Cell: (416) 258-6523 david.burnes@utoronto.ca http://socialwork.utoronto.ca/profiles/david-burnes/ Dominic Ali Media Relations Officer, University of Toronto Tel: (416) 978-6974 d.ali@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON - Professor Graham Collingridge has been awarded the world’s most valuable prize for brain research. Prof. Collingridge, Chair of the Department of Physiology, was one of three recipients of the Brain Prize, awarded by the Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Foundation in Denmark, for his research into the mechanisms of memory. The Brain Prize, which is widely regarded as the “Nobel Prize for neuroscientists”, is awarded annually, and this year Collingridge shares the one million Euro prize with Drs. Tim Bliss (London, England) and Richard Morris (Edinburgh, Scotland). The award was announced on March 1, 2016. Prof. Collingridge’s focus is on the brain mechanism known as “long-term potentiation (LTP)” that underpins the life-long plasticity of the brain. His discoveries, along with Drs. Bliss and Morris, have revolutionized the approach to understanding how memories are formed, retained and lost. Prof. Collingridge has been able to show the mechanism by which LTP is induced, and has developed and applied techniques to identify and describe several of the key molecules responsible for this process. “I am delighted to share this award,” says Prof. Collingridge, who is also senior investigator at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, part of the Sinai Health System. “Working on the cellular mechanisms of learning and memory has been both richly challenging and intensely rewarding for me. I am really excited about now translating discoveries about LTP into new treatments for dementia.” Prof. Collingridge’s discoveries are particularly important in the efforts to treat diseases such as Alzheimer’s, in which the efficiency of brain synapses is altered. His work has contributed to a medication that temporarily slows down the progression of the disease. “Professor Collingridge’s achievements underscore the University of Toronto’s strength in brain science,” says Professor Trevor Young, Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. “Graham is a newcomer to U of T. His deeply impressive body of work illustrates our commitment to fundamental neuroscience -- and its translation into research that will fight dementia and other intractable brain diseases. I’m so pleased to congratulate Graham on receiving this international recognition.” Prof. Collingridge arrived in Toronto in 2015 from Bristol, England, where he is also a professor of neuroscience in anatomy at the University of Bristol. His lab is based at Mount Sinai Hospital. “Everyone at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute is tremendously proud of Graham for this amazing recognition,” says Jim Woodgett, Director of the Sinai Health System’s Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research and a professor in U of T’s Department of Medical Biophysics. “We were so pleased have attracted someone of Graham’s caliber to the institute last year, and I’m confident that his research will continue to fuel discoveries that impact people’s lives.” -30- Media contact: Heidi Singer Communications and Media Relations Specialist Faculty of Medicine Office: 416-978-5811 heidi.singer@utoronto.ca www.medicine.utoronto.ca    

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON — The University of Toronto’s Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education has launched the Mental Health and Physical Activity Research Centre (MPARC) — one of the first research facilities to integrate the study of physical activity and mental health in Canada and internationally. Opened on February 25, this multidisciplinary centre will address the enormous burden of mental health issues. According to the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, one in five Canadian adults will experience a mental illness each year. “Research shows that mental health is a serious issue on campus and in the community,” says Associate Professor Catherine Sabiston, one of the centre’s researchers. “We’re committed to reducing mental health challenges by promoting physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviour, and providing long-term solutions.” While physical activity is one of the most effective ways to improve mental health, those dealing with mental health issues are commonly the least physically active. “The benefits of long-term physical activity are undeniable,” says Assistant Professor Kelly Arbour-Nicitopoulos, also a researcher at the centre. “But the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines might not be realistic for some people, especially if they have mobility issues. Our programs will meet the needs of diverse populations, including cancer survivors and people with spinal cord injuries.” To further meet these needs, the team will study how to incorporate sustainable long-term exercise into peoples’ lives outside the lab. “We want to develop programs that will not only work in the lab, but also translate to the real world,” says Sabiston. “For example, we’re partnering with U of T’s Health and Wellness Centre to help students exercise, set goals, self-monitor and manage stress. We want them to enjoy exercise and make it part of their lives.” The centre contains seven suites where Professors Sabiston, Arbour-Nicitopoulos, and Guy Faulkner will study how exercise can improve patients’ quality of life. It features accessible cardiovascular and strength training, psychological assessment, and data collection and analysis. One of the suites includes space to develop web and app-based technology for mental health and exercise training. In the past, the team faced space limitations when collaborating with others, including the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital and Princess Margaret Hospital. This facility will now let them closely interact with local and international partners and create comprehensive programs. “Now that we have this state-of-the-art centre, we can do our own cutting edge research and also contribute to larger multi-site projects,” says Faulkner. “Sweat is the best antidepressant, and MPARC will be a leading research centre, allowing us to discover and share knowledge about how best to get more people, more active, more often.” This facility was made possible with generous support from the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the Ontario Research Fund. -30-  Media contact: Katie Babcock, Communications Specialist Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education, University of Toronto Tel: 416-278-6568 katie.babcock@utoronto.ca www.physical.utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON — University of Toronto researcher Rachel Harding will be the first known biomedical researcher to welcome the world to review her lab notes in real time. The post-doctoral fellow with U of T’s Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) is also explaining her findings to the general public through her blog. She hopes her open approach will accelerate research into Huntington’s disease. “This should drive the process faster than working alone,” Harding says. “By sharing my notes, I hope that other scientists will critique my work, collaborate and share data in the early stages of research.” Her research at SGC is funded by CHDI Foundation, a non-profit drug-development organization exclusively dedicated to Huntington’s disease. Both organizations aim to accelerate research by making it open and collaborative. Her approach is intended to leverage the experience of a community of scientists. Individual researchers often still work in relative isolation and then publish only their positive discoveries, usually years after the experiments were actually done. Thus, scientists often pursue similar ideas in parallel and miss many opportunities to learn from each other’s mistakes. She has started by publishing raw data and play-by-play details of her first effort on the CERN open digital repository Zenodo. She also posts regular updates on her blog Lab Scribbles, where she includes an experimental summary written in lay terms. Harding hopes this will speed up research into Huntington’s disease, which despite decades of effort researchers have yet to uncover the mechanisms behind the neurodegenerative disorder. It’s known that a mutation in the huntingtin gene leads to progressive cognitive decline and physical deterioration, usually beginning between the ages of 35 and 50. But, the exact structure of the huntingtin protein encoded by this gene remains a mystery. Understanding what the protein looks like will give insight into how it causes disease and potentially reveal ways of reducing its harm. “This is a very large protein and difficult to study. It is significantly larger than most other proteins in the cell,” says Harding. It also has an especially complicated structure with few similarities to other known proteins, which makes learning by comparison more difficult. Considering the challenges and the high stakes, Harding will take all the help she can get. She hopes that by opening her notebook to the research community, she will open new channels of communication and collaboration. She also invites people who aren’t necessarily scientists, including patient communities, to get involved in the process. “This is what research is really like,” says Harding. “It’s not so much about big breakthroughs and polished results, but about incrementally getting closer to an answer. I think by being more open about our research we can all learn how to do the experiments better.” This same community-based philosophy underlies CHDI’s drive to be a “collaborative enabler,” bringing scientists from diverse disciplines together and sharing resources and expertise to advance Huntington’s disease research. It’s also why the SGC provides open access to an array of data and reagents – from chemical probes that enable drug discovery in cancer research to raw data on huntingtin. “By providing access to raw data as well as the enabling research tools, we will help the community perform more robust experiments, which will accelerate the drug discovery process and potentially the development of new medicines,” says Aled Edwards, a Professor in the University of Toronto’s Department of Medical Biophysics and Director and CEO of the SGC. Harding announced she was opening her lab notes to the public at CHDI’s 11th Annual HD Therapeutics Conference, which was held this week. -30- For more information or to arrange interviews please contact: Heidi Singer Office of Communications U of T Medicine Tel: 416.978.5811 heidi.singer@utoronto.ca

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON - The University of Toronto welcomes the $15M investment by the Ontario government for the new Centre for Engineering Innovation and Entrepreneurship (CEIE). As stated in the 2016 Ontario Budget introduced today, this investment will support strengthening the Innovation SuperCorridor in Ontario. This Centre will bring together smart building design and state-of-the-art learning technologies, enabling students, faculty, alumni and industry partners to work together in addressing some of Canada's most pressing economic challenges. "We are pleased at this recognition of the University of Toronto's excellence and contribution to the economy through innovation, entrepreneurship and work-integrated learning," said U of T President Professor Meric Gertler.  "With the province's support to develop the Centre for Engineering Innovation and Entrepreneurship, we will be able to accelerate our efforts in these key areas.” The University has raised almost $26 million in donations to support the CEIE including one million dollars from students through the U of T Engineering Society. Designed to support and accelerate economic growth and long-term prosperity in Ontario and Canada, the CEIE will: Help enhance Ontario’s private sector productivity and competitiveness:
  • Modernize the province’s manufacturing sector by generating innovations in robotics and advanced manufacturing;
  • Accelerate entrepreneurship activity leading to the creation of more technology-based start-ups; and,
  • Produce highly qualified graduates in fields of study that are key to Ontario’s and Canada’s economic success.
President Gertler also welcomed continued modernization of the Ontario financial aid system. These changes will help students with the greatest need get better access to grants upfront and increase the amount of financial support. -30- For more information, contact: U of T Media Relations 416-978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca    

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON -- Public health researchers created a first-of-its-kind peer education project targeting black women to improve breast and cervical cancer awareness and screening for black women living in Toronto’s Malvern community. “There is a lot of silence in the black community. People think that cancer is not a black issue and many survivors are shy to speak out,” said Dr. Onye Nnorom, who leads the Health Equity Research Collaborative (HERC), a group of Toronto-based researchers who are interested in health disparities and community-based solutions. “The goal of this project is to reach out to women and break the silence by promoting prevention and screening,” said Nnorom, who is also Associate Program Director of the Dalla Lana School of Public Health’s Public Health and Preventive Medicine Residency Program. The project is known as Ko-Pamoja, which means “learning together.” It is Toronto’s first partnership of community members and academics to design a breast and cervical cancer peer education program with an Afrocentric lens. This pilot project took place from fall 2015 to January 2016 and trained two community members to lead five educational sessions at TAIBU Community Health Centre, located in Malvern, Toronto. The Canadian Cancer Registry does not collect information on race or ethnicity, but according to the American Cancer Society, African American women have a 41 per cent higher breast cancer death rate, and are nearly twice as likely to die from cervical cancer as white women. Canadian research indicates that immigrant women, including black women, are less likely to get their mammograms or pap tests and often go to the doctor later on, when a cancer has progressed and is harder to treat. This was the case for Leila Springer, a breast cancer survivor and Ko-Pamoja collaborator who was diagnosed with an aggressive form of the disease in 1999. “My entire life changed after the diagnosis. I realized that life is short. Now I talk about the importance of a mammogram,” said Springer who, following her treatment, received regular mammograms and avoided a second cancer diagnosis. “Had I not done a [second] mammogram, my outcome could have been very different,” said Springer, founder of the Olive Branch of Hope, an organization that provides support for women who have been diagnosed with cancer. Upon program evaluation, Dr. Nnorom and the research team, including Dr. Aisha Lofters, assistant professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine and family physician at St. Michael’s Hospital, and Nakia Lee-Foon, a PhD student in Social and Behavioural Health Sciences at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, found a general increase in awareness of risk factors for breast cancer and cervical cancer and benefits of screening and early detection. Most participants reported they planned to get screened post-education. “We need more community-focused research and education for black women to improve cancer screening and outcomes,” said Nnorom, who is the primary care lead of the Central East Regional Cancer Program. “In fact, we need more culturally-specific cancer prevention programs and research to address the needs of the diverse communities in Ontario,” said Nnorom. Ko-Pamoja was funded by a community research grant from Women’s College Hospital. Click here to read the full community and technical reports. -30- Media contact: Nicole Bodnar Director of Communications Dalla Lana School of Public Health University of Toronto Tel:  416-946-7521 Nicole.bodnar@utoronto.ca http://www.dlsph.utoronto.ca    

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more. 

Toronto, ON - Five University of Toronto scholars have been awarded prizes in 2016 by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) – the largest tally of winners at any university in Canada. “Our exceptional performance in the NSERC awards makes it clear that U of T remains a powerhouse for research that has impact in the sciences and engineering,” said Vivek Goel, U of T vice-president of research and innovation. “We should be proud of the range of disciplines encompassed by these prestigious prizes. Earth sciences, medicine, engineering, pharmacy, ecology and evolutionary biology are all represented. And all the research has real potential to improve the human condition.” Barbara Sherwood Lollar is the winner of the John C. Polanyi Award for an outstanding advance in natural science or engineering. This University Professor in the department of earth sciences is cited for the discovery of hydrogen gas and biological chemicals in billion-year-old water samples extracted from fractures in mines in Ontario and South Africa. (Read more about Sherwood Lollar.) Her research has implications for exoplanetary science – similar processes might exist on Mars – as well the more down-to-earth protocols surrounding waste disposal and groundwater cleanup. https://youtu.be/Ofkh0w5KVOc “The joy of discovery has been at the heart of this work by our team,” said Sherwood Lollar, who is Canada Research Chair in Isotope Geochemistry of the Earth and the Environment.  “Even here on Earth there are regions of our hydrosphere and biosphere still unexplored. “We are very grateful to NSERC and to Canada for this award, as there is no higher honour than to receive a recognition that bears the name of our U of T colleague and Nobel laureate, the icon John Polanyi.” The Brockhouse Canada Prize for Interdisciplinary Research in Science and Engineering, which is always awarded to more than one recipient, goes to the U of T team of Shana Kelley and Edward Sargent for their work on AuRA, a device that can reduce the time taken to arrive at a diagnosis from days to less than 20 minutes. https://youtu.be/ieoawocK-ow Combining Professor Kelley’s expertise in electrochemistry and biochemistry with University Professor Sargent’s experience in electrical engineering and nanomaterials, the new technology has great potential to limit the spread of infectious disease, particularly in the developing world. Their startup Xagenic has raised more than $30 million in venture capital and employs 65 scientists, engineers, and molecular diagnostics market experts. (Read more about Kelley and Sargent.) Two U of T scholars received E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellowships. David Sinton of the department of mechanical and industrial engineering wins for his work in optofluidics, a field that involves manipulating light and nanoparticles to control the flow of fluids. Most prior research in optofludics has been dedicated to diagnostic equipment, but Professor Sinton has demonstrated its potential to create a new class of fuel cell remarkable for its efficiency and energy density. His further work includes using light-harvesting bacteria as environmentally friendly means of producing biofuel and developing a technique to select better quality human sperm for use in fertility clinics. (Read more about Sinton.) Associate Professor Stephen I. Wright of the department of ecology and evolutionary biology also wins a Steacie Fellowship for his work on how weeds evolve to become resistant to herbicides, a growing threat to food security in the developing world. Wright has determined that weed species that reproduce sexually (rather than asexually through self-fertilization) are healthier. His work, which establishes that the pace of genome-wide adaptation occurs at a higher rate than previously thought, will make it possible to foresee the extinction of crop species and step up the battle against “super weeds.” (Read more about Wright.) Other winners of national NSERC prizes were astrophysicist Victoria M. Kaspi (Gerhard Herzberg Canada Gold Medal for Science and Engineering) and chemistry doctoral candidate Yasser Gidi (NSERC Gilles Brassard Doctoral Prize for Interdisciplinary Research), both of McGill University. The prizes, valued at a total of $3.71 million, will be awarded officially Tuesday evening at Rideau Hall by Governor General David Johnston, with U of T alumna and Minister of Science Kirsty Duncan and NSERC president B. Mario Pinto at the ceremony. “It is imperative that we praise the groundbreaking achievements of our top researchers to demonstrate our respect and admiration for Canada’s leading scientists and engineers,” Duncan said in a statement. “We must continue to promote, celebrate, and support our talented researchers to foster an environment wherein they can be global leaders in discovery and innovation and generate results that will benefit Canadians today and in the future.” -30- For more information contact: University of Toronto Media Relations Tel: (416) 978-0100 media.relations@utoronto.ca  

Latest Media Releases

July 26, 2017

Four Chief Scientists Appointed to University of Toronto’s Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre

Toronto, ON – Four professors at the University of Toronto have been appointed as chief scientists at the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) Centre. The new appointees will lead research partnerships and other activities in the four areas of behavioural insights applied to consumers, citizens, organizations, and markets. BEAR is a centre at the UofT’s Rotman School of Management that combines decades of research in decision-making with empirically tested tools to facilitate behavioural change. The Centre looks at social…

July 25, 2017

How does Toronto’s Fiscal Autonomy Compare to Other International Cities?

Toronto, ON – Major cities across Canada have been asking for more fiscal autonomy so that they can “control their own destiny.” But what exactly is fiscal autonomy and why is it important? A new Perspectives Paper released today by Enid Slack, director of the Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the municipal finances of eight international cities. Local fiscal autonomy is the extent…

July 24, 2017

New Appointments Strengthen Research and Teaching Activities at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Toronto, ON – An expert in global health and international development and a senior finance professional with over 25 years of experience in capital markets are among the new faculty members who are joining the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management at the start of the 2017/18 academic year. The appointments help to strength the school’s research activities as well its teaching capabilities across all of the School’s pre and post experience programs. Ryann Manning joins the Rotman School as…

July 17, 2017

Machine learning meets materials discovery: Researchers from IBM, Toyota, and Citrine Informatics speak at UofT

Toronto, ON –  Machine learning and artificial intelligence are poised to revolutionize the way companies do business in the fields of healthcare, transportation, and materials research. With the launch of the new Vector Institute, Toronto is quickly becoming a hub for machine learning development. Following this momentum is a three-part limited edition CIFAR seminar series, Machine Learning for Accelerated Materials Discovery, on July 18, 24, and 25, co-hosted by the Departments of Computer Science and The Edward S. Rogers Sr.…

July 12, 2017

New book by UTM prof reveals flaws of workplace discrimination law

Toronto, ON – A new book by U of T Mississauga assistant professor of sociology Ellen Berrey explores the legal outcomes of the most common type of civil litigation in the United States—employment discrimination claims—and the limitations of the law in addressing problems of workplace inequality. In Rights on Trial: How Workplace Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality, American Bar Association scholars and co-authors Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson and Laura Beth Nielsen provide a comprehensive analysis of employment civil rights litigation in the U.S., and…

June 29, 2017

City Hall task force says don't overhaul the system, just fix it

Toronto, ON – In the first general review of Toronto governance in over a decade, SPPG’s City Hall Task Force has released its highly anticipated report offering a practical blueprint to reform Toronto’s City Council. The report outlines six key priorities that City Council can act on immediately, without the need for provincial intervention, to make deliberation and decision making more effective, more efficient, more transparent, and more inclusive. “City Council is not functioning as well as it could, plain…

June 21, 2017

Rotman MBA Honoured with Award from Forté Foundation

Toronto, ON – A graduating student in the Full Time MBA program at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management has received the Edie Hunt Inspiration Award from the Forté Foundation. Alex Walker Turner, MBA’17, received the award which recognizes the achievements of a woman MBA student who has made significant contributions to her school or community to advance women into business leadership positions.  Turner, along with four Rotman classmates, established a new initiative, Rotman LINKS, which connects Rotman MBA…

See all news releases

Media Hotline
+1 (416) 978-0100

Email
media.relations@utoronto.ca

Social

U of T in the News

CBC: The Current | July 27, 2017

From Toronto to Addis Ababa: Life lessons from an ER doctor

Medicine’s James Maskalyk discusses the ER environment. Listen here.

New York Times | July 26, 2017

The lonely crusade of China’s human rights lawyers

Sociology’s Sida Liu comments on China’s dual-state model for legal cases. Read more. 

CNN | July 25, 2017

Your face might tell people whether you're rich or poor

Nicholas Rule of Psychology responds to the results of his study of facial expressions. Read more.